Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$0.66
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Taste of Honey (Student Editions) Paperback – August 12, 1982

3.8 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, August 12, 1982
$0.66

There is a newer edition of this item:


Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Some of Delaney's themes may feel dated but her writing still glitters dangerously and wittily. A Taste of Honey remains a passionate statement about real people trapped in poverty, deprived of ambition and vulnerable to manipulation by the fickleness of others.' Independent (19 November 2008) 'Brawling, boozing, teenage pregnancy and fractured families: Shelagh Delaney's benchmark drama, first staged by Joan Littlewood in London in 1958, has lost none of its relevance 50 years on... The quirkiness and passion of Delaney's young voice still rings out... It remains passionate and pungent.' The Times (19 November 2008) 'Its raw eloquence, sometimes almost lyrical, its tough, swaggering humour...its frank brutality and unblinking humanity.' Sunday Times (23 November 2008) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Shelagh Delaney was born in Salford, Lancashire. She is most well-know for a Taste of Honey, for which she won the Foyle's New Play Award and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. She wrote the screenplay for the film version with Tony Richardson and was awarded the British Film Academy Award and the Robert Flaherty Award. Her other screenplays include The White Bus and Charley Bubbles, for which she won the Writers Guild Award. She has also written for television and radio and has had a collection of short stories published. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Series: Student Editions
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Methuen Drama (August 12, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0413492508
  • ISBN-13: 978-0413492500
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.3 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,555,314 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Delaney wrote this little masterpiece when she was only 18 years old, thus putting her among the ranks of Jane Auten and the like--though Delaney far surpases the young Austen in readability and emotional power.
Any fans of Morrissey and The Smiths will find this work extremely interesting, as Moz has said in many interviews that at least 50% of his songs come from this work. Reading it, one can see exactly why Morrissey took such a liking to this play, it being a parallel (in many ways) to his own childhood landscape. As soon as I finished the last line of this play, I sighed, closed the book, opened it to the first page, and read it all over again. To sum up the profundity of this work I will use a quote that Morrissey used regarding Marr's guitar compositions: "you will cry for hours and hours and swim in the tears."
Comment 16 of 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Throughout literary history, it has always been the most controversial or polemical works that stand out from the others, and take their place alongside other trailblazing novels. This being the case, it is certainly very clear why `A Taste Of Honey' has come to be regarded as one of the most important works of the 20th century. In its time a revolutionary play, this piece has managed to live up to its reputation, even over the many years since its was first published. The reason this famed play became so successful in the first place was precisely because it touched upon so many tender issues that had been strict taboos until it was written. First being published in 1959, `A Taste Of Honey' was released at a time when the world was just starting to get back to normal after the second world war. In an era of turmoil and uncertainty, the issues depicted in the play were precisely the ones that dominated lower class Britain, but, ironically, they were not the ones that were shown by the media, for they were considered to be too lowly to be worthy of depiction. Shelagh Delaney's piece, however, changed this quite drastically for all of a sudden the very issues which the upper class public was trying to avoid, were shoved into their faces. Right from the start of the play, the author makes it quite clear that this will be no ordinary play; touching on such a wide variety of issues ranging from poverty to abortion and prostitution, `A Taste Of Honey' shocked viewers around the world for, for the first time, a play was showing the true realities that ordinary people coexisted with.Read more ›
Comment 16 of 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I found this play to be both fascinating and not the least boring. As said before, perhaps it is too British, but that is what the play is about; trying to find a moment of happiness in a post-war society that saps the very life out of you and stops you from ever bettering yourself. The storyline may seem "simplistic" at first, but the richness of dialogue and its subtlety make for interesting reading and thought.
If you have a pre-occupation with our drab and dreary little island then I would hartly reccommend this play, as it is very true to what it sets out to be. However, if you're "lucky" enough to live in a warmer climate then maybe this play just won't be your cup of tea...
Comment 5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on November 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is one of the better plays I've read by a 1900's writer. The dialogue is natural and gripping, and some parts are priceless! If you want to do a great play with a small ensemble, this is the one (together with the ever-present and also quite marvellous Look Back in Anger, of course)
Comment 5 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a great read. Now I know why Morrissey wrote 'This Night Has Opened My Eyes'.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Glad to have A Taste of Honey as part of our collection. This new copy replaces an old brown but much loved earlier edition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse