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A Tomb on the Periphery Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 198 pages
  • Publisher: Gival Press, LLC; 1st edition (February 28, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1928589405
  • ISBN-13: 978-1928589402
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,431,969 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Being raised under the gun of the mob not the best way to stay a law abiding citizen through ones life. "A Tomb on the Periphery" is the tale of Fabbrizio a man who has been outside the law all his life, but tries to keep in touch with his humanity. An American archaeologist comes into his life, and among other hectic day to day tasks he must do to stay alive, her emergence doesn't help things. A fast paced thriller from first page to the last, "A Tomb on the Periphery" is a must for fans of the genre and community library thriller collections." --Midwest Book Review, June 2008

Few novels can stand up to the promise of tour de force, but here, John Domini is at the top of his form, writing beautifully, humming along like Fabbrizio on his Suzuki. This is a delightful crime novel, with a setting to die for, and at the same time a moving story that should interest a wide range of readers. A Tomb on the Periphery is a wonderful read. --Jay Parini

...John Domini is a master of suspense and of psychological complexity. The result is an edgy, richly peopled and thoroughly absorbing novel." --Margot Livesey

About the Author

John Domini has published fiction in Paris Review, Ploughshares, Threepeny Review, and anthologies. His second collection, Highway Trade, was praised by Alan Cheuse, of NPR's "All Things Considered," as "the way we live now... witty, biting portraits." His first novel, Talking Heads: 77, was praised by the Pulitzer winner Robert Olen Butler as "both cutting-edge innovative and splendidly readable... a flat-out delight." Italian publications of his work is arranged through Tullio Pironti Editore, also the first Italian house to translate Don DeLillo.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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This novel crackles with originality.
Will Pewitt
A must read for both crime fiction aficionados and those looking for pleasures of a solid literary novel.
Raza AHasan
If the hoods discover him dealing contraband on his own, they will kill him.
Dewitt P. Henry

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. M. Appel on November 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
John Domini's "A Tomb on the Periphery" is a fast-paced and finely-wrought novel that draws heavily on the author's obvious erudition and his extensive knowlege of Neapolitan culture and society. The geographic and archeological details are rich and intensely realized, while the dialogue, and especially the humor, is resoundingly pitch-perfect. Fabbrizio, the novel's hard-boiled protagonist, displays an extraordinary psychological complexity and proves himself a compelling guide whose distinctive voice never wavers. Domini does here for Southern Italy what Peter Taylor once did for Memphis and William Kennedy did for Albany--and he does it just as well, with an original and vibrant flair. Readers who invest a few moments to peruse page one of "The Tomb on the Periphery" will soon find themselves engrossed, as I did, and their interest will be very well rewarded.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steve Perlowski on December 28, 2008
Format: Paperback
John Domini's third novel is not my favorite ["Talking Heads:77" is]. But all his stories, including certainly this one, are interesting.
He has the sensibility of a poet, and reading him is not always easy; it's more akin to an appreciation of VanGogh, or Seurat, or even Matisse, than, say, Jan van Eyck, or John Constable. Compared to the impressionists, however, Domini's literary colors have a more precise edge to them, and his stories are worth the extra effort.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By LitCrit101 on October 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
With John Domini's engaging new suspense novel, we zigzag with Fabrizio through Naple's cluttered streets and zoom along its potholed highways with a sexy American tourist on the back of his motorino. Fabrizo, archaeology studies drop out and forger of antiquities, has been talked into violating a newly excavated tomb and stealing a necklace from a young girl's skeleton. His act of theft has been observed by someone who has his own reasons for running from the cops: an African immigrant just arrived after a harrowing sea journey in which his daughter drowned. Within the tensions drawn by this quartet of characters Domini scatters his mosaic of multicultural Naples viewed across time: its antique heritage, its modern day criminals, students, tourists, bureaucrats, and immigrants all trying to get their hands on a piece of grave goods which might represent the very soul of this ancient city - tarnished, priceless, charged with mysterious powers. When Fabrizio starts hearing ghostly voices presaging danger and death, he realizes he must find a way to get the necklace back without falling victim to either the camorra or the cops - and in the meantime, he causes a murder, saves a life, gets lucky, and comes of age. The novel gives us both atmosphere of real Naples - along with a graphic tour of its "underground" both literal and figurative, irresistible humor, language that sparkles and sings on every page, and a hot seduction scene.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lettie Prell on July 6, 2008
Format: Paperback
I shouldn't compare John Domini's "A Tomb on the Periphery" to a novel of almost a whole decade earlier -- Marcos Villatoro's "The Holy Spirit of My Uncle's Cojones (Arte Publico Press, 1999). TOMB is Italian; COJONES is Latino. The young man of TOMB is older, edgier, darker. And Villatoro's COJONES is not in everyone's minds; it's too esoteric to reference, just another small press novel.

Yet neither Domini's nor Villatoro's small press works should be ignored. And while other reviewers are right to praise the suspense and mystery of TOMB, I find my thoughts focusing on the heart of the young man, who in the end must make a choice that will make all the difference in his character -- the consequences of which will reverberate far into his future as an adult, and will determine what kind of man he will be. And that crux of the novel, that choice, that man-in-the-making, is the very thing in Villatoro's novel that was memorable as well.

I cannot say anything more, or else this review would be a spoiler. Read TOMB for what the other reviewers describe. Suspense. Mystery. Utter coolness of setting, of attitude, of plot. Enjoy the ride. But when you get to the end, you may find, as I, that this story of a man in the making -- a young man who finds the cojones to become his own person -- is the story truly worth remembering.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By the 4 am book review on May 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
John Domini's A Tomb on the Periphery is the second of a three-novel series set in post-earthquake Naples, Italy. The main character Fabbrizio, or Brizio for short, takes us on a wild ride through the grittier side of an already chaotic disaster area created Domini's first book in the series, Earthquake I.D. Though it is part of a series, A Tomb on the Periphery can be thoroughly enjoyed on its own.

As a result of the catastrophic earthquake, new archaeological ruins have been uncovered on the periphery of town. Known for being a guy who can get around law, Brizio finds himself tangled up with Shanti, an American with her eyes on a priceless artifact found among the tombs. Fabbrizio unknowingly forms a connection with the artifact and its previous owner, who is now reduced to a pile of bones in a duffel bag being shuffled all over the city. Danger looms from all sides as Brizio attempts to sort out the American, trouble at home, an illicit jewelery replication project and the ever present immigration issues.

Domini treats his readers to a feast of thugs, high-speed action, social commentary, humor and even a bit of romance in a well-packaged story. I found TOMB to be even more satisfying than Earthquake ID and hope the third and final book of the series will continue the trend of better and better.
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