Winter Driving Best Books of the Month Valentine's Day Shop Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums easycohice_2016 All-New Amazon Fire TV Grocery Valentine's Day Cards Knock snow out cold Amazon Gift Card Offer chiraq chiraq chiraq  Amazon Echo All-New Fire Kindle Paperwhite Prime Exclusive Savings in Video Games Winter Sports on Amazon.com SnS

A Wasteland Companion

April 10, 2012 | Format: MP3

$5.00
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:51
30
2
3:10
30
3
2:36
30
4
3:31
30
5
2:39
30
6
3:18
30
7
2:54
30
8
3:40
30
9
2:52
30
10
3:40
30
11
2:35
30
12
2:57
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
For those only familiar with Matthew Ward's work as the Him in Zooey Deschanel's pastiche to `60s pop and aw-shucks charm in She & Him, A Wasteland Companion opener "Clean Slate (For Alex & El Goodo)" is probably a bit of a curveball. Yet after years of working behind the curtain in both She & Him and with more outspoken rock revivalists Conor Oberst, Jim James and Mike Mogis in the Monsters of Folk, this is the M. Ward longtime fans will be delighted to hear - Ward's husky, ashen voice ruminating over barely there acoustic strumming, losing itself in the simple campfire pleasures of storytelling and the barely there hiss of an AM radio. Ward's production talents really started to shine through with his last solo effort, 2009's Hold Time, and the aforementioned work with She & Him and his more esteemed partners in Monsters of Folk hit on familiar Ward touchstones: Brill Building pop, Chuck Berry homage, and dyed-in-the-wool `60s Americana. A Wasteland Companion, Ward's seventh album, continues to touch on all of these influences at one point or another. "Clean Slate" is where Ward's heart belongs though, resting in the shadowy period between the blues and British Invasion pop, a time when recording on more than one track was a studio trick in itself. The sparse tribute to Big Star is striking in its simplicity, and although A Wasteland Companion goes to great lengths to show Ward's dexterity as a producer, few artists can transport a listener as easily as Ward does on "Clean Slate" with just an acoustic and that inimitable voice.Read more ›
Comment 22 of 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
But some of the songs grow on you after repeated listenings. Seems like he took a different direction with this album, which I'm sure some folks will love but I prefer his other stuff.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
From the stark contrast of songs that seem to flow like day to night, to his exceedingly compelling and shadowy voice, to the dynamic openness and echoing sounds of the guitar, A Wasteland Companion is a definite representation of M. Ward's masterful skill and timeless sound. For his eighth solo project, M. Ward delivers this tight knit collection of 12 songs that, although vastly different, seem to connect in an overall beautiful way. None of the songs reach four minutes, but nothing seems missed or left out. "Primitive Girl" has a fun and poppy piano feel, but fades into what seems like a completely different song, going somewhere dark and chilling. His classic vocal and guitar mix is best illustrated in "The First Time I Ran Away," where he seems to be floating over his own fluid guitar playing with textured yet soft spoken vocals. Even Zooey Deschanel, who worked with Mr. Ward on their critically acclaimed music duo She & Him, makes a charming appearance on the fun rock cover of Daniel Johnston's "Sweetheart." Although only a brief thirty minutes in length, this album is worth repeated listens.

By Ace Alexander
Comment 2 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
The first thought that hit me upon listening to M. Ward’s latest release is that this is a perfect NPR album. Maybe I had that thought because the title sounds and feels so much like a Prairie Home Companion, but I think it’s more because this is exactly the kind of music NPR loves to promote. Intelligent writing, catchy melodies, a distinct voice, a little bit dark, a little bit of social commentary, and ultimately nothing too brilliant or deep. I wouldn’t put it up there as one of the greatest albums of the year, but it is certainly an enjoyable listen. It seems at times that M. Ward is trying sing from the perspective of different narratives, and there is something that is undeniably joyous in his more bouncy, moving tunes.

This is an album you forget about and go back to, remember why you loved it for a moment, and then remember why you forgot about it again. My favorite tracks are Me and My Shadow, The First Time I Ran Away and Watch the Show. Not the best M. Ward I've heard, but a lot of fun nonetheless. 3.5 out of 5.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
M. Ward is new to me. I picked this up on a whim because I had listened to a track on a Sampler Site. (Under the Radar magazine often gives away free music to LOTS of indie bands- some signed, some not)He is a quiet singer with a pleasant voice, with lots of acoustic electric guitar. A very introspective song writer. He would feel right at home in a coffee house playing solo or a small cabaret. At first I was not impressed at all. But I always give an album I don't like at least three full listening sessions at different times of the week. (sometimes I'm just not that into it the 1st time) During these listening sessions I came to appreciate the music for it's simplicity and lyrics. I now enjoy listening to the record quite often, and sometimes even find myself singing along. Not too shabby for an impulse buy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By K. Daejin on November 30, 2012
Format: Audio CD
I've been waiting for him to top Post-War: Poison Cup, Chinese Translation. It hasn't happened yet. Hold Time had that spectacular Rave On cover with a grander arrangement than previous works and had layers upon layers of detail. The first half of Wasteland seems a continuation of the bigger Hold Time style, while the latter half is more classic M. Ward: quieter, acoustic guitar prominent. Unfortunately, neither half lives up to the best moments of his previous works.

If you're a veteran fan or if you like the acoustic, melancholy, quieter M. Ward you should probably still buy this. If you're looking for an album of Rave On, you might want to pass.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category