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182 of 187 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2011
The TEAC AD-800 allows you to record audio from the tape deck onto a connected USB flash drive in MP3 format. From there, connect the flash drive to your computer and either save the MP3 file to a music folder on your computer, or write the MP3 files from the flash drive to a CD (using your computer).

While this device does NOT write the audio tape directly to the CD, it's a fairly trivial step to perform that function by writing the recorded music from the flash drive to the CD using your computer. Just be sure that you are translating the MP3 files into standard CDA audio files when you write the CD. Your software should, at some point, ask if you are creating an audio cd - just say yes.

You can download a manual for the AD-800 at teac~com/resources/pdf/ad-800/AD-800-EFS-C.pdf. That might help you decide. (Substitute a period or dot for the ~) Or just google for AD-800-EFS-C.pdf.

Page 28 of this manual specifies the USB/MP3 recording specs as having a bit rate of 128kpbs, but no sampling rate is specified.

This Teac deck cannot write to USB flash memory unless it's formatted in FAT. NTFS and HFS will not work. Most USB flash drives are sold preformatted in FAT32, but you may want to double-check that if your flash drive seems to not work with this Teac. If the flash drive is NTFS you'll have to reformat the USB stick in your computer, choosing FAT format.
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114 of 120 people found the following review helpful
on May 2, 2011
A couple of absolutes: (1)Conversion to MP3 will result in significant loss of audio fidelity, but it's a loss most people can live with and, perhaps, don't hear. (2)A minority of computer users have the hardware/software knowledge to convert their cassettes and LPs to a digital format which will allow them to listen to this music on their MP3 players. Analog to digital conversion may be simple for some, but for most people, their analog music library is lost when their analog playback machines cease to function.

The Teac AD-800 is not a do all, be all for everyone wishing to convert their analog library to digital media. What it does do, however, is provide a very simple process of moving analog information recorded on cassette to a USB flash drive in MP3 format. Once in MP3 format, the digital media can be easily moved to a computer hard drive, cd, cd-r, MP3 player, etc. It is important to note that there will be audio quality lost as the full spectrum uncompressed audio is moved from the analog cassette to the flash drive in MP3 format. For most listeners, the change is imperceptible and acceptable.

Because there also is the MP3 Codec from the CD and the Aux input, you can also convert CDs and vinyl to MP3 via the USB port and a flash drive. Yes, some procedures are very slow and a pain, when compared to copying digital files directly to digital files. Dubbing analog audio is in real time.

My purchasing confession. I scouted this machine for several weeks before buying one. One of Amazon's "More Buying Choice" vendors, at their website, is offering this deck at $30.00 less than it's shown on the Amazon site from that vendor.

I made this purchase because my pro model Tascam deck, after 25 years of use, died. I have some cassettes that deserve being heard. Also, I like the ability to use the Aux to MP3 codec to convert the audio from HD televised concerts directly to MP3.
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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on January 4, 2013
I have always used "metal" tapes the type IV ones for recording at the highest available quality on cassettes. I made a recording using a metal tape and was surprised to hear the previous recording playing under the current recording. It appears that the erase head isn't powerful enough to erase metal tapes. I wrote Teac and they confirmed that the deck would play back metal tapes but not record them and that I should use chrome or normal bias tapes.

The MP3 co-deck creates 128 Kbit/sec files which are alright for use with an iPad but will limit the sound with a better system like one found in the car or a home theater.

These are two pretty substantial limitations but this deck isn't for the audiophile but more for a casual user.
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on October 28, 2011
I am a "Senior Citizen" of the female variety and not at all an audiophile, but I hooked this guy up to an old amp I inherited when my father died and got it working perfectly on the first try! My old cassette tapes sound wonderful, and the documentation is very good, which is half the battle. Fear not to tread...
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83 of 102 people found the following review helpful
on February 16, 2011
I purchased this item because two of the three Amazon reviewers indicated the unit could copy from Cassette to CD. HUH? This is completely NOT true. I have no idea what these reviewers are doing, or how they are doing it, but on its own, this unit does NOT record from cassette to CD. This information can be verified by going to the manufacturers web-site, and checking the customer reviews there. In the end, I am in the process of returning the unit, since I purchased it solely to transfer my cassette tapes to CD. And we all know what "returns," means...a lot of waiting around for products to get back to their point of origin, sellers to notify Amazon of the return, processing credit card refunds, etc. In all fairness to TEAC, I'm sure that this product is otherwise fine. And the selling company is very good about returns, as is Amazon. So everything will eventually be fine. But returning products IS a bit of a hassle, and I will be very careful when making decisions based on customer reviews from now on.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on August 24, 2013
Truth in lending, I use this player to pipe the sound into my computer for archiving my old cassette tapes. So, I do not use the MP3 recording feature.

The system provides great quality. I am recording the cassettes at 44 KHz and 16 bit depth, and I store the sound files in zero lossy .wav format. The noise level and tape hiss are all below -71 dB, and that is a significant positive surprise.

The auto reverse feature means that I can record both sides while doing other things around the studio.

I am quite pleased, especially since my tapes are starting to deteriorate.

The only feature I would have added is a fast forward record, but this is still a solid 9/10 product for me.

In service,

Rich
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2012
This was a recent purchase and the TEAC AD-800 has proved to be an excellent deck. The controls are clear and easy to use. The sound quality from the cassette and CD is excellent. The USB port is on the front face for easy access. I found it very easy to store music from cassette onto a USB storage device for transfer to my laptop. To me, TEAC has a good reputation for quality, so I anticipate long life out of this unit.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
What an amazing piece of equipment! After struggling with dozens of products that claimed to convert cassette to mp3, I've finally found one that works perfectly everytime. The sound quality is excellent and using the equipment is a breeze. Now I can finally convert my large library of cassette tapes into mp3 and enjoy it on my ipod! Thank-you TEAC
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on December 5, 2012
I spent years trying to find a solution for archiving cassettes I had recorded from a 3,000 LP collection in the mid '80s when I moved to England. After waisting $s, time and effort with numerous hardware & software products that never worked, I finally got the TEAC AD-800! What a pleasure! Not only is it simple to use, it is also well beyond my expectations; the mp3 reproduction quality is superb (there are music buffs that claim mp3 degrades sound quality due to compression aspects; I contend the quality of "output equipment" used is the key to any/all sound quality and clarity of any source [i.e. LPs, cassettes, CDs, etc.]!) The AD-800 also lets you archive from any other output devices via a line-in feature, as well as the built in CD tray; the built in USB port that you simply place a flash drive into is the destination for converted mp3 files which allows you to transfer to laptops, PCs, etc.; and of course you can burn the files onto DVD/CD media for ultimate portability! An example of quality is: In '86 I cut a mixed jazz and vocal 10" reel to reel (TEAC studio quality deck), and subsequently recorded that on cassettes when I knew I was moving to England; I just converted those cassettes (4 90 minutes) to mp3 with the AD-800 - the reproduction quality is superb! Just bought another one to add to my bedroom system!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on April 5, 2013
So, I bought this to consolidate my stereo system. I had the multi-CD changer/recorder thing and the dual cassette player. But over time, only one side of the dual cassette player worked and CD player wouldn't recognize CDs anymore. So, it was time for a change. I'm an old-skooler who still listens to cassette tapes. Yeah, it's true. I do. I have a ton of mixed tapes. I couldn't be happier. It is a great unit for a great price. I still haven't used it to its full potential and I have had it for more than two years now.
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