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APOCALYPSE: The Great Jewish Revolt Against Rome AD 66-73 Paperback – March 1, 2012


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APOCALYPSE: The Great Jewish Revolt Against Rome AD 66-73 + The Jewish Revolts Against Rome, A.D. 66-135: A Military Analysis + Jerusalem's Traitor: Josephus, Masada, and the Fall of Judea
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Amberley (March 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1445603160
  • ISBN-13: 978-1445603162
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #345,547 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'If you want a gripping, well-written, detailed story of insurrection against Rome, supported by splendid illustrations, start here' SUNDAY TELEGRAPH

From the Publisher

The great revolt by the Jews against the occupying Roman power in the first century AD ended in bloody defeat. Drawing on a wide range of historical and archaeological sources, Neil Faulkner provides a blow–by–blow account of this long and bitter struggle, together with a shrewd analysis of the underlying issues. This event was a milestone in Jewish national consciousness.

Neil Faulkner is a freelance historian and archaeologist and one of the editors of CURRENT ARCHAEOLOGY. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

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See all 7 customer reviews
Very interesting read.
A. Yiannakis
Despite these sometimes annoying biases, however, the author has managed to come up with a rather good book which is very interesting to read.
JPS
This is a very interesting book written from an unusual perspective.
J. Tham

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By J. Tham on July 10, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book does a wonderful job of describing the conflict not merely by recounting the dates of events and names of leaders but by trying to get inside the head of the countless nameless people who lived it. The friction between the Greek-influenced factions (from the times when the area was ruled by one of the Alexandrian successor-states) and the more traditionally minded majority, between landed noble and tax-broken peasant, between conservative priest and apocalyptic visionary, etc etc, Faulkner makes the conflict as complicated as it probably was. The author's comparison between the Jewish rebels and modern-day Hamas and Hizbollah, as well as his many references to Marxist theory, will undoubtedly offend many readers but it should not deter you from this book. One of its most interesting features is the description of the nature of Jewish religion at the time, as something truly dynamic and ever evolving, alive in a way that can be hard to understand in a modern day and age. Between discussions of economics, religion and class, you get some quite good accounts of warfare in those times, again as seen by the common spearman or slinger rather than his general.
This is a very interesting book written from an unusual perspective. I highly recommend it for anyone who is already heavily into history. The casual reader may or may not enjoy it as much as the history-buffs because it sure helps to know a few things about ancient history (such as the Roman Empire or the Successor States).
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26 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Weitz VINE VOICE on March 9, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First let me state that this book is very well written, although at times the prose tends to be a bit "over the top". It was a good read, the the battle descriptions are excellent, although I don't agree with all of his interpretations of ancient battle. He has been heavily infuenced by Keegan, and the works of SLA Marshal, even though the latter has been discredited.

My main complaint about the book is its Marxist historical view.

It has a bibliography of 104 books; but 6 are Marxist books on the English Civil War, 18 are other Marxist works, and yet only two of the works are by post-1990 Israeli authors! Trotsky, and John Reed are quoted, and Poncho Villa is glorified in a work on Jewish history.

The path that he leads us on can be frustrating. As`the author is about to describe the battle of Beth Horon we enter a 60 page excusus on Qumran.

To this author even Danton is too conservative! Yet, he does make one think; perhaps there was an element of class conflict in this struggle...but surely not to the way he portrays this, as an exclusively a struggle of class.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Yiannakis on December 20, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very interesting read. The author is clearly well informed about the history of the period. Probably a bit too scholarly for some people but if anyone is interested in this period of history the is the book to read.

Personally I think the author did a great job
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Format: Paperback
I read a lot of history books and I have reviewed a fair few on Amazon. I rarely give five stars and of the five star books this is amongst the best. It is opinionated in the best possible way, the author has strong views and supports them with first class research presented within a well-crafted structure, providing a joy to read whether you agree with the thesis or not.

I'd like to contrast this with another book I recently reviewed: `Jerusalem: The biography' by Simon Sebag Montefiore. Jerusalem covers a much wider period, overlapping with Apocalypse only in the first century AD and perhaps in the fact that both attempt to explain aspects of modern Israel on the basis of fairly ancient history. The comparison is therefore possibly unfair, but I would argue that what makes Apocalypse a better read goes beyond the greater superficiality of Jerusalem (which is inevitable give the greater time period covered). It is also not just because Apocalypse is able to paint a much more exciting picture of battles and military campaigns, because its smaller scope allows more time for detail. It is certainly not because the characters are better painted in Apocalypse; Montefiore is a master at describing personalities and so Jerusalem is, if anything, slightly better in this respect. For me, where Faulkner's book really excels and where Montefiore sadly fails is clarity of intent: Faulkner's book has purpose while Montefiore's seems almost cobbled together.

Unfortunately, the clarity of intent in Apocalypse probably explains why it has had a much more restricted audience. The middle of the road political correctness of Jerusalem is a major reason why it has such high profile endorsement from the great and the good.
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