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ARRL Ham Radio License Manual: All You Need to Become an Amateur Radio Operator Paperback – June 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Series: Arrl Ham Radio License Manual
  • Paperback: 283 pages
  • Publisher: Amer Radio Relay League; 1 edition (June 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0872599639
  • ISBN-13: 978-0872599635
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,786 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ward Silver has been a ham since 1972 when he earned his Novice license (WNØGQP). His experiences in ham radio led him to a 20-year career as an electrical engineer, designing microprocessor-based products and medical devices. In 2000, he began a second career as a teacher and writer, leading to his receiving the 2003 Bill Orr Technical Writing Award and in 2008 he was recognized as the Dayton Hamvention's "Ham of the Year".

Ward is Lead Editor of the two primary amateur radio technical references, both published by the American Radio Relay League -- the ARRL Handbook and the ARRL Antenna Book. He is the author of all three ARRL licensing study guides and writes the popular QST magazine columns "Hands-On Radio" and "Contest Corral". His popular email newsletter, "The ARRL Contest Update" reaches 25,000 readers twice a month. He has written two other Wiley titles, as well; Two-Way Radios and Scanners, and Circuitbuilding Do-It-Yourself. The ham radio detective mystery, "Ray Tracy: Zone of Iniquity" and a tutorial, "Antenna Modeling for Beginners" are his most recent books.

On the air, he enjoys DXing, contesting, building antennas, and participating on his local ARES emergency communications team. He is a founder of the World Radiosport Team Championships and is a member of the YASME Foundation's Board of Directors. Outside of ham radio, Ward plays the mandolin, dabbles in digital photography, and enjoys biking, camping, and canoeing.

Customer Reviews

I will pick it up this evening.
John M. Jones
The book was well written to give you enough information in a interesting read.
Mary Bos
If you study this book, you will pass your Technician's License exam.
Thomas J. Archer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Mary Bos on May 13, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I used this book to study for my technician level test. I passed with a 100 percent. The book was well written to give you enough information in a interesting read. This book is not too dull or dry except for the FCC rule part. But rules are hard to make exciting to read. This book told you enough to pass the test with plenty to spare.

The technician test is not too technical, no electrical circuits or attenna design type questions. The test is more operating procedure, permitted operating frequencies, permitted wattages and attenna heights.

If you want to stay on the local voice repeaters, packet radio, or internet protocols on the 2m, 1.25m, 70cm and the other permitted bands; a technician's license is all you need.
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89 of 96 people found the following review helpful By James Perkins on October 17, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is organized as a welcome to amateur radio, followed by chapters with course sections. At the end of each section certain exam questions are listed. You can then flip to the 392 question Element 2 exam at the end and test your knowledge. The book is good for teens through adults and is written in straightforward language with most essentials concisely introduced and explained.

I come from a technical background so the book was a review, but I appreciated the textbook-like layout where each concept was introduced (to a high-school or higher audience), then I could go to see the exact test questions and answer listed at the back. I feel I thoroughly know all the base material now that the questions are derived from.

If you want to go from an 80-90% passing grade on your exam to 100% score, then supplement the ARRL book with Gordon West's "Technician Class" book. Mr. West works the from the other direction, presenting each question, then the answer, and then briefly explaining the answer. I found that a perfect strength to complement the only weakness I was able to find in the ARRL book.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By dadajoy on November 28, 2009
Format: Paperback
What I mean by the review title is that the manual has a dual personality. The information presented in the manual seems to be adequate, and there is a lot of rah-rah for the fun that is Amateur Radio (and rightfully so). BUT, the ability to find specific information is frustratingly poor. GOOD is that the entire test question pool is present with the correct answer; BAD is that there is no page reference given so that one may go from the question to the page where the correct answer may be explained. GOOD is that the manual is easy to read; BAD is that the Table of Contents does not give chapter subdivision titles. GOOD is that the writers of the manual are true believers in the great thing that is Amateur Radio; BAD is that even the index underserves - not enough references, not enough specifics.
I took my copy and wrote a detailed Table of Contents in Word, including all the subdivisions and their pages. Also, I redlined in next to each test question answer the page where the information was found. Unfortunately, this extra work I did only helps me, not other readers. Also, there are several test questions where an explanation for the correct answer cannot be found. Back to the Good/Bad duality for a second, GOOD is that as the reader finishes a particular section of the text, there is a gray box telling the reader to "now go answer these questions..."; BAD is that some of the questions were not answered or explained in that section of text, and there is no way to know if there is anywhere else in the text where that question is explained.
Now, I am not saying that the book is worthless nor recommending against it; what I am saying is that it is exceedingly difficult to find things quickly. Certainly there is learning value to the reader who takes the time to do the extra referencing research as I did, and I do recommend that anyone who buys the book put in that extra effort. Good Luck, and I hope to hear you on the air!
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Format: Paperback
Excellent resource, it is all in here. If you study this book, you will pass your Technician's License exam.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By P. Jacobs on December 9, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are lots of things to learn about radios and lots of books available on different technical topics. This one is focused on getting your first ham radio license.

The ARRL Ham License Manual is written in a 'welcome to the club' type manner with most of the information on radios, licensing, and ham radio as a hobby explained farily clearly. Moreover, it contains ALL of the ACTUAL questions in the pool of potential test questions. In other words, if you read the book and work through the questions there will be no surprises on the FCC exam!

This book was used as the text for a two-day ham radio license class I attended. I read the book ahead of time and worked through the test questions at the end of each section. All of the answers are given and linked to chapters in the book if you need to go back and see what you missed.

If you have a background in radio or catch on to technical things easy, this book could easily prepare you to pass the Technician (basic level ham license) without taking a class. Used along with a class or with help from a local ham radio club, this book would help prepare someone with no radio background or little technical experience.

ARRL is the dominant, authoritative amateur radio organization in the US and this book is 'a standard' among hams. It won't make you an expert or explain every technical detail of radio but will help you get your first ham license. At $25 it is a very good value.
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