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3
votes
You will see the login page when you connect to the local (asus-generated) wifi AP and try and access an internet page. Then, you log in and *all* the devices connected to the Asus will have access to the internet without login. Essentially, the hotel only sees one client - the Asus - it's just that client is sharing its access with everyone else.
Mar 21, 2014 by Hugo Fiennes
1
vote
mac Jan 21, 2014
if you are asking if it's Mac compatible, yes. I use it on my macbook pro all the time.
Jan 21, 2014 by Marc Swindle
0
votes
*If* you have hardwired ethernet in the area with weak wireless, you can use this device to set up a separate wireless network in that area of your apartment. I think however, a standard wireless router would serve you better. This device will not work as a wireless repeater to extend an existing wireless network.
Feb 14, 2014 by Amazon Customer
0
votes
I've not tried with an iPad but it works perfectly with Galaxy Note 2014 under the same scenario.
Dec 12, 2013 by mr philip g elliott
0
votes
It should work fine. On a Mac, it just shows up as a USB network device - no driver required. Another option would be if you were to power it off a separate USB power source (or somehow block the "data" part of your Chromebook's USB port) it would convert an Ethernet Internet source into a new Wifi network - might also solve your problem.
Mar 13, 2014 by Amazon Customer
0
votes
For me, when I connect it a the hotel's wired network connection, creates a wifi hotspot that I then connect all my devices to, much like your wireless network at home. I find it more reliable than using the hotel's wifi and can control my personal security much easier.
Mar 18, 2015 by John Van Walsum
0
votes
The ASUS provides WIFI for any equipment (laptop, iPhone, etc,). You need to be able to connect to the WIFI by detecting the ASUS and entering its password. My personal experinec with the ASUS: for reasons unknown, my iPhone easily loses the connection and switches to another WIFI network.
Mar 5, 2015 by Gilbert Van Kerckhove
0
votes
This is not a gigabit device. I believe it's runs around 40mb
Dec 12, 2014 by C. Best
0
votes
Open DNS works by pointing a domain name to a public IP address. So, if you have a public IP address all to yourself ( like at your house ), then yes--yes, you can point a domain name to a network where this router lives. But, it would be bad form to point domain names to public networks like cafes or wifi at school; it would also be unlikely to work. Once you've got traffic from the Internet coming into your public IP after visiting your DNS server, you'll have to redirect traffic from your public router to this router, then off to whatever service you want to be offering via your domain name--a thing you are very unlikely to be allowed to do on public networks. Also, this router is just plain horrible. The firmware crapped put on mine in a matter of days. I ended up returning it.
Nov 28, 2014 by LMizuhashi
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