AWB

December 16, 2008 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
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Popularity  
30
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3:36
30
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3:52
30
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3:59
30
4
3:39
30
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4:25
30
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4:08
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3:58
30
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4:01
30
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3:30
30
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5:35
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11
7:09

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 16, 1995
  • Release Date: June 16, 1995
  • Label: Rhino Atlantic
  • Copyright: 1974 & 1995 Atlantic Recording Corporation
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 47:52
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001OGNQNC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #58,193 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
28
4 star
7
3 star
0
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1 star
1
See all 36 customer reviews
If you can get hold of a copy BUY IT.
Ian Goodhew
I became an AWB fan becuause of this album...in my opinion it was their best.
Larry W. Green
"Got The Love" is funky, with a good groove and nice harmonies.
ND.NY

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By RJM Music Man on September 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Nothing more needs to be said about this great album. It is indeed a classic. The idea of adding the live track of Pick Up The Pieces from the Montreux Jazz Festival was a great one that made me purchase the CD - only to find out that the original 22 minute jam session had been cut to 7 or so minutes. WHY? The disk has over 20 minutes of blank space, so it wasn't because there was no room.

It could have fit with room to spare. The full version is one of the greatest jam sessions you'll never hear unless you have the original 2 lp set from that time. It is not available on CD. The fact that some genius made this decision is mind boggling. Because of this I can only give it 4 stars. With the full version it would go beyond the 5 stars allowed to a 10.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 1, 2002
Format: Audio CD
The Average White Band will go down as one of the most overlooked and underrated bands of their kind. Their much heralded "White" album remains a true testament to their musical prowess. Who cares if they were a couple of white guys from Scotland? Their playing and passion for R&B and soul music is stamped all over this certified classic. The first five songs are probably the ones fans will recognize the most, yet the other five are equally as good. My personal favorites are Person To Person (funky mid-tempo track), Nothing You Can Do (dreamy soul ballad), and There's Always Someone Waiting (low-down groove with biting lyrics). This particular reissue from Rhino also contains a live version of Pick Up The Pieces that is even better than the studio version. I only wish they could've included the entire length of that jam instead of an edit, but that's only trivial compared to the rest of this outstanding album.
This one's definitely for serious music lovers.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Larry W. Green on January 25, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I rembember when I heard "Pick Up the Pieces" for the first time, I really thought it was James Brown. The more I listened it didn't sound quite raw and gritty enough, it was very polished and tight. This album really showcases this bands songwriting deftness especially on "Keeping it to Myself" and "You Got it". I was a bit suprised by the guitar playing on this album, because most all white guitarist during the early 70's played with a distinct rock and roll flavor, but hey! these guys were funky. I was delighted to hear an all white band that played like the brothers but with their own unique sound. They also did an admirable job on "Work to Do" from the Isley Brothers. I became an AWB fan becuause of this album...in my opinion it was their best.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rachel Avila on August 14, 2000
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this album when it first released in the 70's; then bought the cassette in the 80's and purchased the cd a few months ago and let me say this is money well spent. This cd is a classic. It brought back lots of memories and I play it over and over again, just as I did 20 years ago. I highly recommend it. You get a clear sound on the cd and it's not that expensive either.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Spencer on January 9, 2007
Format: Audio CD
You wanna talk about some white boys with soul, AWB epitomize the meaning and some. These guys were self-taught musicians who went out of their way to learn some of the best soul tunes of their day and put it all to perfection. I'm the type of guy that loves good music no matter what color you are and as a black man I would say AWB were one the best bands ever in terms of creativity,vocals, and down-right funky soul. Hamish Stuart was one of the best vocalist of any band and Alan Gorrie was great also. The rest of the guys from Robbie,Onnie,Malcom, and Roger really played some of the most intricate funk tunes ever layed down on wax. The horn section was just as good as Tower of Power and Earth, Wind & Fire. See, AWB were different from a lot of bands in terms of the way they were promoted because like Maze Featuring Frankie Beverly, they sold from not just singles but album sales. Although "Pick Up The Pieces" was their one and only number one single they still managed to go no less than gold from 1974-1978 and continued to put out solid material until they disbanded in 1982. For some reason I still don't think AWB get their proper due because black radio still choose to only play "Pick Up The Pieces"and "Love Of Your Own" (from the Soul Searching album) while the other stations may only play "Pieces", what a shame.

Now things may have been different back in the day and I'm sure they were, being I was born a year later in 1975 and wouldn't know but to me they were one of the great bands such as EWF(71-79 only) Ohio Players,Isley Brothers, and the Doobie Brothers being the others that you could play straight through without pressing stop.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dylan on February 10, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Hello. Me again, this is the second album, but their first on the Atlantic Record label. This is also the first with the infamous "AWB" logo (with the naked woman's backside forming the W). If you like this album, you will probably like "Cut the Cake", and possibly "Soul Searching".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By BluesDuke on October 22, 2010
Format: Audio CD
During the early 1970s, a Buddah Records collection of doo-wop noted of the Skyliners (whose classic "Since I Don't Have You" was part of the anthology) that they "didn't borrow the material from their black brothers, but they did borrow the feeling." Which was another way of saying what critic Dave Marsh said of lead singer Jimmy Beaumont: you didn't have to be black to sing (or play) soul. Fast forward to the middle of the 1970s and along came the Average White Band, a Scottish sextet who proved all over again that you didn't have to be black to sing and play soul---especially since, for the most part, they borrowed no material from their obvious models but sure did get, keep, and learn how to deliver the feeling in ways that belied (then and now) their modest enough band name.

Their buttery horns, modeled to a large extent on the Memphis Horns, were only their most obvious trademark, and with two saxophonists other than Roger Ball and Molly Duncan it might not have factored that way. Their original and ill-fated drummer, Robbie McIntosh (he would die of a heroin overdose within a very short time after this, their second album, began making waves), knitted to bassist/vocalist Alan Gorrie for a rhythm section as tight as the classic Funk Brothers and as exuberant as vintage Stax but sounded entirely like themselves, McIntosh's iron polyrhythm a perfect match to Gorrie's heartpunch bass lines.

But the real secret weapon just might have been rhythm guitarist Onnie McIntyre---his seamless guitar work kept the rhythm section and the horns married, letting each have their head when needed but tugging and chugging them back to the whole without pushing or shoving.
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