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Abominog


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Editorial Reviews

Side One: 1. Too Scared To Run 2. On The Rebound 3. Chasing Shadows 4. Prisoner 5. Sell Your Soul Side Two: 1. That's The Way That It Is 2. Think It Over 3. Hot Night In A Cold Town 4. Hot Persuasion 5. Running All Night (With The Lion)

Product Details

  • Vinyl
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Bronze
  • ASIN: B000YO5QQA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #926,999 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By electricphase on September 4, 2000
Format: Audio CD
OK, this album will certainly disappoint core Heep fans from the Magicians and Demons-era. Enter the new decade and we find a completely different Uriah Heep at the works, and guess what? they are quite brilliant! Sorry, but Ken Hensley's departure was good for the band. Abominog is definitively more mainstream oriented but the songs are very good. Enter Pete Goalby, and Uriah Heep gets a superb vocalist, sounding a bit like Foreigner's Lou Graham, only better. Hensley's replacement, John Sinclair (ex-Heavy Metal Kids and Gary Farr's Lion) came up with some of the best keyboard intros, sounds and arrangements ever. The freshness of the new line-up works fantastic together with the old nucleus of Mick Box (g) and the "Bear" Kerslake (d). Abominog is a great commercial-rock album from the early '80s. And don't forget that the rhythm section here consists of Lee Kerslake and bassist Bob Daisley (relatively fresh from Rainbow and Widow Maker), the same rythm partners in Ozzy Osbourne's two greatest albums (Blizzard of Ozz and Diary of a Madman), which were recorded within a year-and-a-half of Abominog. If you like QUALITY ROCK, buy it!

Same comments apply on Heep's outstanding follow-up: HEAD FIRST... an excellent album.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Best Of All on August 13, 2009
Format: Audio CD
Nowadays, it is quite common for a band can take a hiatus from recording/touring for a couple of years. Back in the day, a year away from the studio or off the road was a recipe for disaster. But guitarist Mick Box went against the norm in 1982 and Uriah Heep roared back onto the scene.

The band had spent several years trying to reinvent itself while keeping an ambitious recording/touring schedule before calling it quits in 1980. But Box used the time off to plot a sustainable course for the band, which included the return of drummer Lee Kerslake - who brought bassist Bob Daisley from their stint with Ozzy - along with vocalist Peter Goalby and keyboardist John Sinclair.

Five of the 10 original tracks are covers, but the unbridled "take no prisoners" approach to the sound brings back fond memories to the gothic metal from earlier albums, but with the drive that was looking to the future. Box shines on the top cut - Too Scared to Run - while Sinclair takes the reigns on Chasing Shadows and Hot Persuasion fits neatly in the harder-edge AOR sound that was finding airplay on FM radio. The best cover is Prisoner (lyrics by D.B. Cooper/performed by Sue Saad and the Next), with That's the Way That It Is (Paul Bliss/The Bliss Band) very close behind.

The album cover may be chilling for some, but the music inside - bolstered by six bonus tracks - sizzles. This was a tremendous comeback by a band that had imploded in 1980.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Kim Fletcher on January 11, 2002
Format: Audio CD
In April of 1981, after 12 years of ups & downs, Uriah Heep collapsed in a heap of broken dreams. Ken Hensley who had held the keyboards position, and had been main songwriter had left the band, after more rangour in the ranks, and his replacement Gregg Dechart had definitely not worked out. The last two albums, Fallen Angel (78) & Conquest (79), had been Heep's weakest, the final tour being very difficult for the band (support band "Rage" had blown them off the stage every night) and quite frankly, agony for the paying public. On the last night of the tour drummer Chris Slade left to join Gary Numan and, after realizing he had set his sites a little low, later joined "The Firm" with Paul Rodgers & Jimmy Page before taking over the drum seat with "AC / DC". Bassist Trevor Bolder joined Wishbone Ash, talented vocalist John Sloman was let go after trying to take over the show, leading the band in a very unheep like direction, leaving. The only remaining founding member Mick Box, with the name, but no band.
After a couple of months of staring at the inside of the bottom of a bottle of vodka, band agent Neil Warnock coaxed Mick out to give it one more go. Mick's first telephone call went to long time cohort drummer Lee Kerslake (who'd only originally left the Heep over a falling out with Ken Hensley) having just been fired by "Ozzy Osborne", Lee was glad of his old job back and became Heep's 5th & 7th drummer, although to be fair he has been with the band 28 years in total now. Also just sacked from Ozzy's band was the great "Bob Daisley" on bass, (Heep's 6th Bassist), so he was dragged along by Lee Kerslake adding his considerable songwriting skills to the party.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Bauschek on November 26, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Lots of cover songs. Lack of Originality. More hard rock them classic Rock? So what! this album rocks. The mix of the group members Daisley-Kerslake back end. Box's guitar with Sinclair on Heavy Keys. And Peter Goalby's vocals fit perfectly into the mix. What Box did on this release was pull the band out of the 70's/doldrums. MTV Played a cover song from this LP in medium rotation good for HEEP at the time. No Byron, or Wetton? Thats not great but Hell Sinclair and Goalby easily made up for that with their own talent. Out of the 200+ hard rock/metal albums I bought in the early 80's Abominog rocked the hardest with the best mix of Hard rock/Keys/vocals. I wore the disk out.
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