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About Time Paperback – Large Print, June 12, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 382 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (June 12, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1481893386
  • ISBN-13: 978-1481893381
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,467,044 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Michael Murphey grew up in Eastern New Mexico, and spent nearly thirty years as a newspaper journalist in the Southwest and Pacific Northwest. Following his retirement from journalism in 1998, Murphey began his second career in baseball, where he is one of three partners in a company called Dave Henderson Baseball Adventures, which produces the Oakland Athletics and Seattle Mariners fantasy camps as well as other adult amateur baseball events throughout the country. His life as an old-man baseball player has also afforded him time in recent years to resume writing. He divides his time among Spokane, Washington, Phoenix, Arizona, and Fort Myers, Florida.

More About the Author

Michael Murphey grew up in Eastern New Mexico, and spent nearly thirty years as a newspaper journalist in the Southwest and Pacific Northwest. Following his retirement from journalism in 1998, Murphey began his second career in baseball, where he is one of three partners in a company called Dave Henderson Baseball Adventures, which produces the Oakland Athletics and Seattle Mariners fantasy camps as well as other adult amateur baseball events throughout the country. His life as an old man baseball player has also afforded him time in recent years to resume writing. He has been an avid lover of the written word all his life. He divides his time among Spokane, Washington, Phoenix, Arizona, and Fort Myers, Florida.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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First, let me say that this book is seriously funny.
The Eclectic Bookworm
It would be a lesser work without the questions it forces us to confront.
RebeccasReads.com
Well developed characters and good reader interaction with the author.
Jon Westmoreland

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Awesome Indies Reviews on April 8, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Global Research Consortium is a super-secret, secure facility experimenting with time travel. Its carefully selected staff, sequestered on site, is committed to a five-year mission. No unauthorized visitors are allowed, and no permanent staff members are permitted to leave the campus—at least not in the conventional sense. After all, time travel information in the wrong hands, that is, hands that did not pay for access, would be a terrible thing. The place is also full of spies, insinuated into the program by its various government and corporate sponsors, there presumably to make sure that they have as much access to discoveries as their competitors and allies.
Despite its investors' hopes, and their considerable financial contributions, time travel may not be the road to riches they had hoped. There are complications. First, the procedure can only translate living matter, which means the Travelers must go naked. All attempts to include clothing, implants, or carried items have fatal side effects. Second, people are not physically sent into the past. Their present (future) selves wind up cohabitating the same body as their past selves, meaning that Travelers can't be sent back to a time before they were born, and when they return, their memories of the experience quickly diminish. And thirdly, it is not THE past to which they travel. It is the past of one of an infinite number of parallel dimensions, many of which are largely indistinguishable from ours. This of course means that any changes made in those pasts may not affect OUR past.
That's essentially the near future (2040s) setting for this unique take on time travel. It is a lighthearted tale with moments of humor.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Frances Stanford on June 26, 2013
Format: Paperback
I am not a fan of science-fiction, but something about the preview of this book grabbed my attention. Murphey has done a masterful job of creating an exciting plot based on time travel. In his own unique way he provided simple to understand and humorous explanations of complex scientific theories. By interspersing his own ideas in the midst of the chapters, he brings the reader back to the present and allows time to reflect on the story line.

Stella, Marshal and Marta stand out as brave characters prepared to take a leap back into their past for the purpose of science. Readers sympathize with them as they experience the distorted views and confusion they had in their role as guinea pigs for the government and industry. Even though the setting for the novel is 30 years in the future, Murphey comes across as believing that people are still pawns in the hands of those with money and authority. He also proposes that as much as we would want to return to the past to make changes in the future, there is little chance of this ever happening.

I am so glad I read this book. If I was entranced by it as a non-science-fiction lover, I can only imagine the delight it will be for true fans of this genre.
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Format: Paperback
Reviewed by F.T. Donereau for RebeccasReads (1/14)

In the new time travel novel, “About Time,” author Michael Murphy manages to create a biting critique of modern American society’s subjugation by corporate entities without laying down a boring treatise. The humor flowing through the pages of this tale lighten things to the highest level of enjoyment. Whimsy seems an important part of the voice of this work. The flavor alive in the pages seems wry and knowing, a wise uncle, perhaps, letting you in on what you really ought to have an understanding of. The characters full lives and the sexual tensions therein, doused with fun and clandestine adventure, help smooth over the necessary technical aspects of their missions. What I mean to say is, Murphy's stroke of genius is in not miring the heady aspects of the science fiction in too much direness. Our author knows how to wink. And also how to say things between the lines of pleasure, that just might be important.

The three main protagonists in “About Time,” Marta Hamilton, Shelia Wilkerson, and Marshall Grissom, are drawn for the reader in ways that make them real. Their individual personalities are clear and precise; reading you feel you know who they are. This is especially important in a story with futuristic, scientific elements; you want the players presented to make a world believable. Gratefully, surrounding characters such as Gillis and Gormley and Rose, etc., are brought to life with telling strokes that widen the scope of the overall settings presented. Elvin Detwyler might be considered a main character by some, but I like to think of him more in line with a spice added to the soup, one that gives it the precise jump and spark needed.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Let's Fact It! When a book reviewer opens the mail and pulls out this book, well, for me, there were two choices... One, of course, to send it back... My first reaction was to lay it aside so I could give myself a talk about saying I'm a professional reader... Ha! It may take me several days but then I normally give in...The book is here... How bad could it be?

Actually, not bad at all! In fact, it's quite funny, except I got tired of one little overdone scene. After all, no self-respecting female scientist in the future would allow being called by her first name among a group of Drs. But I do recognize that, for some reason, men enjoy this type of word play, so... I hereby give apologies to Dr. Hu for taking advantage of this situation...and please do start using your formal title even though you'll be mistaken for Dr. Who or because it sets off a round of "Who's on First!" Really! Have Fun With It! The men will not have nearly as much fun if you play it...

Some might say a novel about Time Travel falls into the science fiction genre and this one--maybe even a thriller--after all there's people killing others... But, come on folks, let's be honest... this is pure Humor. In my opinion, no matter what the genre really is when you start talking about comparative size of men as part of the work environment, well, it's very hard to consider a serious story line, don't you think? Nevertheless, I'll try to give you an overview...

In October, 2044, the Global Research Consortium in Arizona has begun to do major research on time study. Now the thrust of the "thriller" part is that this group wants to travel into the past for pure monetary gain. Well, surely, you guessed that right?
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