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Academic Capitalism and the New Economy: Markets, State, and Higher Education Hardcover – August 17, 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press (August 17, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801879493
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801879494
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,131,386 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Painstakingly researched... Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades warn of increasingly blurred boundaries among higher education, the state and the world of commerce.

(Sharon Singleton Connection 2005-01-00)

The writers have made careers out of studying the issues they write about. They certainly have done their homework.

(Charles Pekow Community College Week 2005-01-00)

Slaughter and Rhoades offer the most coherent account of how the academy is mired in commercialism.

(Roger W. Bowen Academe 2005-01-00)

Unlike other recent popular works,... this one is not critical or afraid of intersections of higher education and the world of corporate sponsorships; the authors just want to help universities exploit these new opportunities for fun and profit.

(Choice 2005-01-00)

Provides a densely detailed and chilling description of the current 'state' of the university in the United States.

(Alison Hearn Topia: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies 2006-01-00)

Represents a timely scholarly work that unveils the complex development of academic capitalism and calls for a critical re-examination of the mission of higher education institutions.

(Huey-li Li Educational Foundations 2005-01-00)

An impressive book and a major contribution to knowledge... The theory of academic capitalism presented in its pages will certainly stimulate and guide further studies in higher education for some time to come... All students of the educational arrangements in the new economy will find themselves in debt to the authors for their farreaching theory of academic capitalism, the wide variety of studies they offer to confirm it, and for the standard they set and the model they provide for subsequent work.

(Leonard J. Waks Teachers College Record 2005-01-00)

The strength of this volume is their treatment of the impact of academic capitalism on academic work.

(Edward P. St. John Contemporary Sociology 2005-01-00)

This carefully argued and documented book fosters critical understanding of, if not the possibilities for 'regime change,' the implications of our actions.

(Susan Talburt Review of Higher Education)

Perhaps the best book for understanding the commercialization and commodification within higher education is Slaughter and Rhoades's Academic Capitalism and the New Economy... It tracks the deep and pervasive changes in policy and practice that have created new social network and organizational structures, vastly changing the function and role of higher education to serve corporate interests... and covers a variety of topics including expansion of patenting and patent policies, copyright policies, ownership of courseware and teaching materials, entrepreneurial activities by departments, corporate connections of university trustees, and advertising and branding contracts.

(Adrianna Kezar Journal of Higher Education 2008-01-00)

An important and much needed critical perspective.

(Irwin Feller Journal of Higher Education)

In the field of higher education and studies of colleges and universities, which are so dominated by stale and antiquated atheoretical arguments, this is the most innovative and important book to come along in years.

(Robert Rhoads, UCLA)

From the Back Cover

As colleges and universities become more entrepreneurial in a post-industrial economy, they focus on knowledge less as a public good than as a commodity to be capitalized on in profit-oriented activities. In Academic Capitalism and the New Economy, higher education scholars Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades detail the aggressive engagement of U.S. higher education institutions in the knowledge-based economy and analyze the efforts of colleges and universities to develop, market, and sell research products, educational services, and consumer goods in the private marketplace.

"Perhaps the best book for understanding the commercialization and commodification within higher education is Slaughter and Rhoades's Academic Capitalism and the New Economy... It tracks the deep and pervasive changes in policy and practice that have created new social network and organizational structures, vastly changing the function and role of higher education to serve corporate interests... and covers a variety of topics including expansion of patenting and patent policies, copyright policies, ownership of courseware and teaching materials, entrepreneurial activities by departments, corporate connections of university trustees, and advertising and branding contracts." —Journal of Higher Education

"Slaughter and Rhoades offer the most coherent account of how the academy is mired in commercialism."— Academe

"Provides a densely detailed and chilling description of the current 'state' of the university in the United States."— Topia: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies

"All students of the educational arrangements in the new economy will find themselves in debt to the authors for their far-reaching theory of academic capitalism, for the wide variety of studies they offer to confirm it, and for the standard they set and the model they provide for subsequent work."— Teachers College Record

"This carefully argued and documented book fosters critical understanding of, if not the possibilities for 'regime change,' the implications of our actions."— Review of Higher Education


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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Pagnucco on September 1, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is a book that actually engages social theory in a very rigorous way while trying to explain general trends within American higher education. It is very, very good, starting with the fact that it avoids platitudes and simplified comments that one would find in short editorials.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Laura M. Harrison on December 7, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you want to understand why higher education institutions are so frequently failing to keep their eye on the ball regarding prioritizing student learning, this book explains it well. The authors do a tremendous job of shedding light on the systemic changes that must take place if colleges and universities are to retain a prominent role in serving the public good.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daniel P. Liderbach on January 20, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Though I had hoped to learn about "Academic Capitalism" by reading
this book, I discovered that the book was written for those who already
had learned about the interrelationship between academic institutions,
corporations, and the economy. I am not one of those.
Thus I put the book aside before I was a quarter of the way through
the book.
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