Access 2003 For Dummies and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $21.99
  • Save: $5.01 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Access 2003 For Dummies Paperback – October 10, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0764538810 ISBN-10: 0764538810 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $16.98
45 New from $10.98 122 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $9.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.98
$10.98 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Access 2003 For Dummies + Access 2003 All-in-One Desk Reference For Dummies + Access Forms and Reports For Dummies
Price for all three: $61.93

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: For Dummies; 1 edition (October 10, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0764538810
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764538810
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #673,259 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Grab your data and get it on the table!

Meet the wizards, ask the right questions, give data a form, and share it online

What? You’re still letting your data run around loose? Grab this book and build a database you can, well, access! John Kaufeld demystifies databases for even the truly timid. You’ll soon be constructing tables, turning out reports, delving into existing databases, and querying with the best of them, all with the greatest of ease.

The Dummies Way

  • Explanations in plain English
  • "Get in, get out" information
  • Icons and other navigational aids
  • Tear-out cheat sheet
  • Top ten lists
  • A dash of humor and fun

About the Author

John Kaufeld has written all previous editions of Access For Dummies as well as several other books. John also operates shippertools.com, an online shipping assistant.

More About the Author

John Kaufeld makes complex things easy, and helps parents -- especially dads -- learn to connect with their kids through board games.

And he loves every minute of it.

He's a best-selling author, speaker, trainer, consultant, board gamer, dad, and all-around geek. He also believes passionately in the power of board games as a tool for connecting with family and friends, but more about that later.

Back in 1993, he started writing about America Online, Microsoft Access, computer games, tabletop games, and more in the popular "...For Dummies" line of computer books, eventually churning out over 25 books in the line, along with a few random ones for other publishers. Over the years, his titles sold more than 2.8 million books in over 15 languages around the world.

John started writing as a high school stringer for The Republic (Columbus, IN). At about the same time, he expanded into radio as a weekend DJ for WWWY Radio (also in Columbus, IN).

In college, he scrambled for stories as the weekend news anchor for WLBC Radio (Muncie, IN) and the afternoon news editor for WBST Radio (the Ball State University PBS station).

During his first stint in Corporate America, John spent 10 years in various Information Systems and System Development jobs. His second term in Corporate America saw him working in communication, publicity, and marketing for a national trade association, a regional bank, a high-end manufacturing company.

Along the way, John wandered into the social game industry. As a kid, he and his father played many rounds of Hasbro's "Monopoly" (consistently using the wrong rules), and actually finished the game two or three times.

Then he discovered German board games (also known as "Eurogames"), and his gaming world -- and parenting style -- changed forever.

These days, you can often find John in the board game areas at Gen Con and other game conventions. He indulges in "Puerto Rico," "Agricola," "Race for the Galaxy," and just about any train game that wanders past (especially Empire Builder). If you see him, definitely say hi. After all, he never bites. (Well, at least not since the therapy.)

He's currently finishing a Master of Arts in Professional Communication at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, and is on the university staff in marketing and social media. He also freelances for several national and regional publications.

You can email him at jkaufeld@aol.com, the email address that launched a few million books.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
5
3 star
0
2 star
4
1 star
2
See all 22 customer reviews
The content is great and easily understandable.
Ms Cougar Lady
This book desperately needed an editor with a big red pen to cut out all the fluff and meaningless small talk.
Greg Edwards
I think you would be better off using a book that can show you a few things.
savejina

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By M. Davis on January 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
I've taught database theory at university Master's level, used MySql in a

UNIX/Linux environment, and have a Ph.D. in computer science. I don't need to

learn SQL or how to program, but I did need to know how to get something done

with this MS Office product, and quickly. This book was a perfect fit. It's

not strong on VBA or other programming hooks, or what Microsoft calls database

projects, and it's no substitute for learning the fundamentals of database

design and use (though it does have some very good introductory material), it

is quite comprehensible and thorough as a tutorial, guidebook, and reference

on the user interface that is unique to MS Access. Access is a big

application and this is, appropriately, a big book. Again, it was just what I

needed. Regarding another reviewer's dislike of the cute jokes, it's really

not bad at all, a real relief compared to the otherwise excellent O'Reilly

`animal series' computer books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Maloon on September 24, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Though I've not worked all the way through the book yet, it appears to offer what I expected. Sometimes the "cute" remarks that the "For Dummies" series seems to expect of all their authors get a bit old, but by and large the book appears to be a good reference for a first-time database writer. I previously wrote a fairly complex business database in Paradox, and so much of the information I'm looking for is "how" rather than "what" or "why" with respect to writing databases in Access. I've always found the "For Dummies" series of books a good value, and this one is no exception. I'm sure there are levels of depth that this book is going to skip over -- I've seen little reference to VBA programming, for example. Still, a person writing an application requiring those degrees of depth and security is probably not working in Access to begin with. Such a person is probably not self-taught. Nor are they likely to be affordable to a small company such as I work for.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By John Matlock on May 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is a quick and dirty guide to using Access to get information into and out of a database. Access is part of Microsoft's Office Suite. It's designed for small, personal use database applications. This book fits that philosophy quite well. It uses the front end philosophy that Microsoft has done so well to enable a database to be designed, an input form to be created and an output report to be generated.

The list of things that this book (and to a lessor extent Access itself) doesn't do is long. There is very little theory on database design. There isn't much on SQL, the language of databases.

The idea here is to get a fairly simple, desktop you might call it, database up and being productive very quickly. And at this task the book does quite well. I also think that this is a good way to get started in learning about databases. If you subsequently find that your needs are more than you can get out of Access, you'll have a bit of background that makes the jump to a real database like Oracle, DB2, or SQL Server that much easier.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Theresa Bogema on July 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
We had already begun to create the database so much of the book was not necessarily helpful. But there were many tips and hints that helped us improve on the database. I would reccomend this book especially for those who have never opened Access before and for those want to tweak and improve their current database to be more user-friendly or professional looking.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By savejina on December 31, 2007
Format: Paperback
I am not an extreme power user of Access but I use it everyday and maybe build a query or two every week. However, I find this book so hard to use and not very efficient. It never really comes out and TEACHES you anything--most of it is just fluff. If you wanted to learn how to build a very simple table and build really simple queries, it could probably help you do that but so could most Access websites or just a good co-worker. But if you have ANY questions that go outside of that box, like how to add grouping, sums, totals (things people really need when looking at huge tables) or if you wanted to use a formula/create criteria/build something a little more "complicated", this is not the book for you. I think you would be better off using a book that can show you a few things. I imagine most people buy this book to get some of the basics but also get something they could use as a reference guide when you get stuck--
If you're like me and you do get stuck, you might not find the answers you are looking for in here.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Marny Freedman on June 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book is poorly designed and poorly presented. It starts out by assuming you know something about Access, or about databases, and only after a few chapters addresses the needs of beginners. The author's style lacks conciseness and clarity, and at times reading this book seems to get in the way of learning. And then there are (yawn) the endless attempts at humor. A light approach to a technical subject can be fine, but when you have to wade through it to get to instructional material it's a little much. Microsoft has free on-line tutorials for Access 2003. After giving up on this book, I used them, liked them, and learned from them. And, they're FREE.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?