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Access Controlled: The Shaping of Power, Rights, and Rule in Cyberspace (Information Revolution and Global Politics) 1st Edition

5 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
ISBN-13: 978-0262014342
ISBN-10: 0262014343
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"…[V]aluable to anyone who is interested in information policy." -- ShinJeong Yeo, Journal for the American Society for Information Science and Technology

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Ronald Deibert is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk Centre for International Studies at the University of Toronto. John Palfrey is Henry N. Ess II Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at Harvard Law School. Rafal Rohozinski is a Principal with the SecDev Group, a global strategy and research analytics firm. Jonathan Zittrain is Professor at Harvard Law School and the author of The Future of the Internet--And How to Stop It. Deibert, Palfrey, Rohozinski, and Zittrain are the coeditors of Access Denied: The Practice and Policy of Global Internet Filtering (MIT Press, 2008).

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Product Details

  • Series: Information Revolution and Global Politics
  • Hardcover: 640 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; 1 edition (April 16, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262014343
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262014342
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,207,733 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Smartly organized and edited, Access Controlled is essential reading for anyone interested in studying the methods governments are using globally to stifle online expression and dissent. There is simply no other resource out there like this; it should be required reading in every cyberlaw or information policy program.

The book, which is a project of the OpenNet Initiative (ONI), is divided into two parts. Part 1 of the book includes six chapters on "Theory and Analysis." They are terrifically informative essays. The beefy second part of the book provides a whopping 480 pages(!) of detailed regional and country-by-country overviews of the global state of online speech controls and discuss the long-term ramifications of increasing government meddling with online networks.

The book offers a useful taxonomy to illustrate the three general types of speech and information controls that states are deploying today. Throughout the book, various authors document the increasing movement away from "first generation controls," which are epitomized by "Great Firewall of China"-like filtering methods, and toward second- and third-generation controls, which are more refined and difficult to monitor.

The individual authors seem to adopt a somewhat gloomy outlook toward the long-term prospects for "technologies of freedom" relative to "technologies of control." But I think it's vital to put things in some historical context in this regard. It's important to recall that, as a communications medium, the Net is still quite young. So, is the Net really more susceptible to State control and manipulation than previous communications technologies and platforms? I'm not so sure, although it's hard to find a metric to compare them in an analytically rigorous fashion.
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