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Act of Treason: The Role of J. Edgar Hoover in the Assassination of President Kennedy Hardcover – June 1, 1991

ISBN-13: 978-0788196669 ISBN-10: 0788196669 Edition: First Edition

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 671 pages
  • Publisher: Carroll & Graf Pub.; First Edition edition (June 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0788196669
  • ISBN-13: 978-0788196669
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.7 x 2.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,451,437 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Books about the Kennedy assassination keep appearing, and now North, a Texas lawyer, claims that the President died as the result of a plot masterminded by Louisiana Mafia chieftain Carlos Marcello--and, more importantly, that FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover learned early on about the plan but did nothing to stop it, warning neither the Secret Service nor the Dallas police. His motives, according to North: hatred of Kennedy, fear that the President would get rid of him and a longing for the accession of Lyndon Johnson, whom Hoover had in his pocket because of scandals surrounding the vice-president. North neatly sketches Hoover's bizarre personality, how he ran the FBI and the ways in which the FBI is supposed to cooperate with other agencies. Most of the book, however, is a near-interminable, day-by-day collection of press clippings involving Hoover, President Kennedy, Robert Kennedy and various crime figures; much of it seems barely relevant and could have been cut without harming North's thesis. But he argues it well, amid the clutter, and certainly helps explain many odd failures of the Warren Commission, whose findings have long been almost universally disregarded.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

This seems to be open season on Hoover, with North's sensational book coming fast on the heels of Curt Gentry's impressive and devastating biography, J. Edgar Hoover: The Man and the Secrets ( LJ 8/91). North further tarnishes Hoover's reputation by accusing him of nothing less than treason for allegedly covering up a Mafia conspiracy to assassinate John F. Kennedy and manipulating the Warren Commission. The focus here on Hoover's activities and influence puts Act of Treason on a higher level than the typical "conspiracy theory" book. North effectively blends press reports, FBI records, and interviews to create a daily "chronicle" of the pertinent events of 1960-64. His theories and contentions are well documented (over 2300 source notes are listed!), and he presents a convincing portrait of Hoover as a ruthless power broker. This is another fascinating and unsettling look at the dark side of American politics. Highly recommended. See also Mark Lane's Plausible Denial: Was the CIA Involved in the Assassination of JFK? , reviewed above.--Ed.
-Thomas A. Karel, Franklin & Marshall Coll. Lib., Lancaster, Pa.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

To see a Fox News interview about Betrayal in Dallas, please use the following link. http://tinyurl.com/3nrhutc

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 54 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is one of the most important books that I have read on the JFK assassination - and I have read over a dozen since 1964. It is the "final chapter" as it provides the "big picture" answer.
It uses the information that came out since the 1970s. The Congressional Investigation in 1977 resulted in a number of books afterwards.
If you read Curt Gentry's "J. Edgar Hoover, The Man and the Myth" you would know that Hoover had been filing false expense reports for decades, and built up a small fortune. (He stayed at hotels and ate at restaurants for free, then collected expenses as if he had paid.) If he ever left office, he would have been convicted for fraud, and died in jail. He had no other option but to die in office, since he could not (or would not) get a "get out of jail free" card. (The Watergate Burglary came apart when one of the burglars did not get this, as promised.)
You should know that this GOOJF card is not just an invented scene in the movie "Clear and Present Danger". Back in the 1940s the four-star General who headed the CIA went to President Truman with a complaint about an assignment: it clearly crossed the line into a felony. But Harry just wrote out a signed but undated full Presidential Pardon! Read the biography of Allen Dulles, "Gentleman Spy" for more details.
And LBJ's crony was implicated in various frauds, some of which were said to be in complicity with organized crime. LBJ was likely to be dumped as vice-president, and would also face prosecution, disgrace, and jail.
Mark North has collected a number of letters that passed between LBJ and JEH. Surely no one would expect either of them to put their plans in writing?
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Vince Palamara on January 8, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Mark North's "Act Of Treason" is a great, albeit dry, book on Hoover (and JFK/ RFK), making great use of contemporary news accounts and so forth. This is a nice companion volume to R. Andrew Kiel's outstanding book on Hoover, along with Anthony Summer's masterpiece "Official and Confidential." Get this!

P.S. Who he thinks may be J. Edgar Hoover in his photo section is actually Secret Service agent Stewart G. "Stu" Stout, Jr.

Vince Palamara

Secret Service expert, History Channel, author of 2 books, in over 30 other author's books, etc.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Barry Krusch on April 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found that this book provided excellent background in my research for Impossible: The Case Against Lee Harvey Oswald (Volume One). The book has hundreds of useful facts about the FBI, including this one, on page 213: "The Federal Bureau of Investigation has nearly 1500 informants in the 8500-member Communist party, according to a former agent who also made public a report criticizing the `autocratic' way the bureau is run. The former agent is Jack Levine. . . . The bureau, Mr. Levine said, had found that the informants payroll had become a `severe drain,' and that `through its dues-paying FBI contingent it had become the largest single financial contributor to the coffers of the Communist party.'"

Why is this important? Because from this we learn that the FBI had thoroughly infiltrated the Communist Party, and in fact, 17% of the members of the Communist Party were, in fact, FBI informants. Thus, the fact that Lee Harvey Oswald was a communist means that there was, on this evidence alone, a 17% chance he was an FBI informant!!

Anyway, lots of other great information on Hoover. It's not necessarily the best written book out there, but there are going to be facts in this book you aren't going to find in any other book.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Rocco Dormarunno on April 18, 2013
Format: Paperback
Conspirators, accessories after the fact, spin doctors... no matter which level you believe the Federal Bureau of Investigation to be involved in the assassination of JFK, Mark North's "Act of Treason" more than indicts J. Edgar Hoover for his role. A good deal of JFK assassination literature has come and gone, but the reason for the longevity of this book is its meticulous research and referencing. Some readers may find the amount of mundane FBI material to be deadening, and admittedly, I had to put the book down and take a deep breath to unscramble my brain every once in a while. This is the book's only flaw but it's a good flaw. I would rather have too much evidence than too little.

Other readers of JFK assassination literature should take heed of one thing, however: there is no grassy knoll, four-to-six shots, black dog, umbrella man investigation here. Those nuts and bolts of the events are well-covered in other books like Mark Lane's "Rush to Judgement" and Josiah Thompson's "Six Seconds in Dallas". Mark North, in this book, is more focused on the behind the scenes manipulations of other law enforcement agencies, politicians, the media and, ultimately, the American people and the people of the world by Hoover and his cronies.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Johnny B on February 21, 2014
Format: Paperback
The author did a huge amount of research for this book.

His perspective of reporting daily or weekly events from 1960 thru the assassination really shows how the killing of JFK was almost inevitable. But this book is really about Hoover and, while I knew he did bad things, he went way beyond anything I had previously known.

One of the great stories of that era is the author's description of the first meeting between Hoover and RFK as attorney general. The word hatred does not begin to describe their feelings towards each other. Stalin and Hitler were buddies by comparison. As a result, Hoover would not even report death threats made against the President.

A must read for anyone studying Hoover, the assassination or the 1960's American political rivalries.
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