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87 of 93 people found the following review helpful
on January 10, 2000
I've read this book several times since it first came out. I've given 2 dozen as gifts and will give more as it is easy to read/comprehend. I think it should be required reading by every 6-12th grader in every school to try and balance the incessant/overwhelming dumbing down of our kids as relates to 'REAL' scientific inquirey and the foundational knowledge upon which our republic and civilization rests. You won't find this in public or school libraries because of the 'censorship' that goes on, and not by right-wingers, so you must get this in your own library. It's very thought provoking and if you read Nat. Geographic, etc. the known technology and many artifacts from past eras take on a whole new meaning.
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65 of 70 people found the following review helpful
on March 25, 1999
"Adam and His Kin" by Ruth Beechick has given me a new look at ancient history. Where many historians think that it took man thousands or even millions of years to invent musical instruments or develop the ability to smelt metals, "Adam and His Kin" shows how men did these things in less than 1000 years after he was created.
Where much of "Adam and His Kin" is imaginary and supposition, it is biblically based. It showed me that Adam, Seth, and Noah could have kept their own written records. They did not need to depend on oral tradition to pass important historical information from father to son. It radically changed my interpretation of the book of Genesis.
This book stimulates the intelect of an adult and yet keeps the attention of a child. My 8 year old daughter and 6 year old son have enjoyed listening to this book.
Despite the fact that one person I asked did not care for this book I was convinced to buy it because it came so highly recommended by several home school curriculums. I have also read other books by Ruth Beechick and highly recommend them. These include "You Can Succesfully Teach Your Child," "The 3 R's," and "Home School Wars and Other Writings." Ruth Beechick is a very interesting and understandable writer.
Beverly S., a home schooling mom in Maryland
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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2004
WOW! There were a lot of ideas in this book that I already had, and a few that were new to me, but the way that Ms. Beechick weaved together the Biblical account with history and made it easily readable was just amazing. I've read many books on this time period. Most of them are very scholarly, which definitely has it's place, but this was a quick, light, fun read, that was still jam-packed with lots of info. She also includes a great bibliography, so I can't wait to start researching more.
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35 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on November 5, 2004
The book reads like a narrative, starting with Adam and Eve in the Garden, ending with Abram leaving Ur. It was a refreshing way to read the unfolding of Adam, Eve, Abel, Cain, along with Noah and his son's lives. The author spices things up by inserting what she believes these people felt and thought.

" You won't die, " the serpent said. "God knows that when you eat the fruit your eyes will be opened and you will be as gods, knowing good and evil." The woman contemplated the tree. Its fruit looked pleasant and good to eat. Would it really mak her wise like God, knowing good and evil? She stepped in for a closer look. Then she picked a fruit. Turning it around in her hand, it seemed a small matter if she should taste it. Just one little bite. And so she did. At that moment, the spirit within her died. Its radiance faded, and she stood beside the tree feeling helpless and naked. The serpent quickly disappeared. He was not going to hlep her. "That deciever!" she exlaimed. She did know evil. That much of the serpent's words came true. And how terrible it was! Evil was inside her. Coul she throw asay the fruit? Could she cough up the bite and spit it out? Could she undo her act in any way? No, it was done. She couldn't restore her innocence. Adam must eat the fruit too. He must not leave her alone in this condition. Frightened and distraught, she ran to Adam, the remains fo the fruit still in her hand. Seein her pitiful state, Adam needed no explanation. Her confused words, her crying, her begging tore at his heart.

Though not EXACTLY what may have happened, it's not impossible something to this magnitude did occur. With Cain and Abel, Ruth Beechick writes:

As he shouted at his brother, a terrible idea came into his mind. "Come into my filed," he said. "Let us talk in privacy out there." In the field they continued talking until Cain suddenly rose up with one of his garden tools and killed his brother Abel. Cain had seen the death of animals, but this was the first death of a human. It was shocking even for hard-hearted Cain to see the dead body of his brother lying there...fastforwarding to after God cursed Cain, Ruth writes:

Cain said, "That punishment is more than i can bear." His voice sounded sorry now but it was sorrow not about his deed, only about his punishment.

Ruth also gives some nice information about our biblical characters. She notes tht Seth meant "appointed one." Later on she explains that Nimrod means "let us rebel.", which further illustrated Cush's revolt against God, describing Nimrod's purpose. The characters and where they migrate to, the names, etc are accurate. One has to keep in mind while reading that it's Ruth's interpretation on how the individuals feel or what they thought. It was a very quick read.
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42 of 50 people found the following review helpful
on November 6, 2011
I bought this book because it got really good reviews with the majority of people stating that it made the Bible more understandable, almost like a novel. I have been reading through some really heavy tomes about the Bible lately and thought a light read might be fun.
For me, it was not. The author states that she taught Sunday School for children and that she has taken the things she taught and woven them into stories which may have been true, but are really things she has just made up to make the Bible Stories more readable.
She described God creating the world and her description is nothing like I have ever been taught, studied as theory, or even thought about. It sounded and read like a description given to a five year old.
So, I went on though the creation including plants, animals, and Adam and Eve. Somehow she missed the part about Eve being created from Adam's Rib, which is crucial to the understanding and follow through of the theology present throughout the rest of the Bible.
She described Adam (who brought Eve into it for some reason) naming the animals and conversing with them. I do not see how Adam named those animals, let alone subdued them,(no explanation given on the crucial issue of why he might Need to subdue them), slowly and ponderously. Throughout the discussion, Adam sounded, not like a man created in God's image, but like a poor guy who could hardly get through the day. It sounded as though this entry was written for a 10 year old and Adam just did not sound too bright.
Next, we come to the Temptation by the Serpent (snake). The author got mixed up on the trees involved: the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life.
Adam and Eve did fall and were banned from the garden. But Eve, in this story, got caught up with God's promise to give her a child and the real consequences were kind of glossed over. The author did mention that God killed animals for their skins so that the couple could be clothed, and Adam and Eve were properly shocked at the sight of the Blood, but there was no statement that adressed their shock or the significance of the Blood.
Well, I have to admit that at that point, I had decided that the book was too simplistic for me.
I feel like I have spent so much time searching for the real causes and effects; the true history of Theology: the significance of the Blood; and the ramifications of that first Sin that this stated Sunday School Study is just not for me. I thought it would be a presentation of alternate theories with Scientific backup, which is how the book was described by the publisher.
I was truly disappointed and plan to spend no more time with it. It just is not what I had envisioned it to be. I want to state this clearly, so that someone who sees it and thinks what I did, will not buy it. It may be a good family Bible Story Companion, but in the introduction, the author clearly states that parts of it are fiction and fantasy. She is Not trying to pass it off as being scripturally accurate. Unfortunately, this is not clear from the publisher's review.
So, if you are looking for a book with plausible Bible stories with inaccurate conversation and scenes being included, then it is OK. If you are looking for something doctrinally sound, look elsewhere! I was surely disappointed and do not remcommend it because important doctrine is missed so that an interesting blend of fact and fiction can be presented.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on September 14, 2012
I purchased this book, because it was recommended as a Family Read Aloud for the Ancient History Program that I am using this year with my daughters. We are also reading Genesis right now. It was confusing to them and to me to try to explain to them what parts of the book are true, and what parts are the authors imagination. I did not like how Biblical Truth about God was mixed in with interpretation and complete myths. If you are looking for a good read aloud I would not recommend this book. We read the first 8 chapters, because I keep saying maybe it will get better, but it didn't. I am now using this book as an example to my girls that it is okay to stop reading something that isn't true and is confusing you about the real Truth the Bible!
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34 of 41 people found the following review helpful
on August 27, 2005
The Bible is the deepest, most intelligent, and powerful writing ever penned. Because it is such a profound book, parts of it may at times seem confusing. Many times I struggled through the pages of the Old Testament trying to comprehend the history. Sometimes I would give up, becoming weary of the long string of names or descriptions of who begat whom.

Why did God's Word have to be so difficult for me? I so wanted to be able to read the Bible and be as interested in its history as I was in the Tudor Era. Of course, I never dreamed that there was a book out there just for me.

When my Mom presented me with Adam and His Kin by Dr. Ruth Beechick I immediately devoured it. The story, the history, the Bible! Mrs. Beechick retells the story of Genesis like no other author has. I found myself intrigued and delighted as I read about Eve's heartbreaking struggle in the Garden of Eden, the tragic murder of Abel, the fascinating story of Noah, and even the tower of Babel.

It was like reliving history beside these amazing figures and the spectacular events which surrounded them. I could actually feel Eve's longing for the forbidden, I mourned for Noah as he was made fun of and taunted while he built the most amazing boat in the world, the boat that God instructed him to build.

In Adam and His Kin history comes to life and you experience what life was like thousands of years ago. In my opinion, this book is a masterpiece and I can give it nothing but the highest praise.

J.M. Age 14
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on December 4, 2011
After hearing all the rave reviews when this book first came out, I purchased it and began reading it to my children. There were inaccuracies pretty early on in the book that continued. I found myself (often) telling my children, "We don't don't believe this," or "The Bible actually says..." After a few chapters I thought, "Why in the world am I reading this to my children if we don't believe much of what's being said?"

So, I got rid of the book! If you choose to purchase it, please pre-read it and compare the stories with the Bible account. Then you can make an informed decision.
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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on August 30, 2002
The author is very clear that not every theory about creation or the beginning of human history is used. And that's not the point. It is meant to be a novel of what might have happened. One does not have to buy every theory, but it is still extremely interesting because it "fills in the blanks" of what you might have wondered about the Genesis accounts. It makes sense and I think it makes an excellent companion to Bible study and ancient history study.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2005
This important book gives children a Biblically accurate overview of the book of Genesis, told in a narrative style. Read this book to your children before you begin your study of ancient history.
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