Adam's Apple (Rudy Van Gelder Edition)

July 17, 2007 | Format: MP3

$9.03
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:49
30
2
6:34
30
3
6:30
30
4
7:29
30
5
6:12
30
6
7:34
30
7
6:54

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 17, 2007
  • Release Date: July 17, 2007
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2003 Blue Note Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:02
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000TRTPF0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #71,830 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Of Wayne's three quartet albums for Blue Note, this is arguably the best.
Michael Brad Richman
He really sounds amazing and the quartet setting really allows for some fine interplay between he and Shorter.
Jack Baker
Except for a very agitated and fidgety bonus track, this is a very successful album for Wayne Shorter.
Bomojaz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Horan on December 20, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Even if you don't have any of his records, you're probably familiar with Wayne Shorter's warm, yet introspective saxophone sound from his work with the Jazz Messengers and Miles Davis. Indeed, despite Wayne's endearing modesty, I don't think I'm alone in feeling that his solos often outshine Miles'.

Adam's Apple, Wayne's fifth album for Blue Note, is probably his most instantly enjoyable among a crop of spectacular recordings. First of all, Wayne is an imaginative and prolific composer. I rate the title track and El Gaucho among his finest tunes. Secondly, this LP has a funky swing guaranteed to set your feet dancing. It's one of those rare modal albums that's rich enough for the seasoned listener, but bops hard enough for the kids. Finally, Wayne is backed by superlative, forward-thinking musicians: Herbie Hancock, Reggie Workman, and Joe Chambers.

The sound quality on this RVG edition is pristine and it boasts a terrific bonus track by Hancock. Don't wait any longer than you have to, this baby merits rush delivery!
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Tim Niland on September 19, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Amongst Wayne Shorter's consistently excellent Blue Note recordings of the mid to late '60's, Speak No Evil gets the nod from most critics as the best record of the period, but I have always preferred the stripped down quartet sessions of Juju and this wonderful album. Joining Shorter (tenor sax only, no soprano) on this disc are Herbie Hancock on piano, Reggie Workman on bass and Joe Chambers on drums. This session followed the classic Blue Note blueprint of the period, mixing the blues and ballads of hard bop with some of the emerging freedom of the period. There's some burning saxophone on the driving title track, abstract balladering of "501 Blues" and the epic soon-to-be-standard "Footprints" which would go on to be one of the most memorable jazz compositions of the post-war period.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Michael Brad Richman HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on September 13, 2003
Format: Audio CD
"Adam's Apple" finds tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter returning to a quartet setting after the avant-garde, multi-horn experiments of "The All-Seeing Eye" (see my review). Recorded during two sessions in February 1966, the album features Wayne with the rhythm trio of Herbie Hancock on piano, Reggie Workman on bass and Joe Chambers on drums. These players all knew each other well as Wayne and Herbie had been members of the Miles Davis Quintet for more than a year, not to mention their prior Blue Note collaborations. Furthermore, Wayne and Reggie had both been in the Jazz Messengers in the early 60s, and Wayne had partnered with Joe Chambers on his previous two Blue Note sessions. All this added up to a great deal of musical rapport and chemistry that translated directly to the tunes. Of Wayne's three quartet albums for Blue Note, this is arguably the best. As great as "JuJu" and "Etc" are, they have their flaws -- "JuJu" comes off sounding a little too Coltrane-like (it's hard not to when you play with both McCoy and Elvin) while "Etc" was often uneven (it did sit in the vaults for years). With "Adam's Apple," Wayne had reached the pinnacle of his style and expression in modal jazz, and shortly he would go searching for new frontiers both with Miles and on his own. But at this stage in his career he simply gets an A+ for "Adam's Apple."
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rodney H. Golden on October 22, 2010
Format: Audio CD
A re-visitation of this album I had on vinyl in the seventies/ eighties, it is as forward-looking today as it ever was. Other reviewers have had their say (rather accurately and in concurrence with me actually) about the programmatic aspects of the date, so I will refrain from redundancies and concentrate on what Mr. Coltrane (as Eric Dolphy reverently called John Coltrane) said "the listener gets". Timeless, well-conceived, and striking throughout, the strange spiritual deja-vu is that when I first laid ears on this, and most of his Blue Note works, it was as if I was there with him/them, or in some way sharing a spiritual, even physical presence in another dimension somehow. As a child? In 1966? Discovering this later well into my teens? Believe it or not, yes! Wayne's penchant for science fiction as displayed on the sleeve liner of his 'Phantom Navigator' LP on Columbia confirmed this for me. I was even lucky enough to meet him and get an autograph after a Weather Report Concert in Norfolk, Va. in 1980. The high point of the album, ON THIS STAR DATE, yes a la Star Trek (depending on the celestial vector relationship, for me, or one's "MOOD-ality" when approaching a listening session as a familiar veteran) is TERU. I was brought to tears with the mortar-like agape that it generated before, recollected, and now in even more concentrated form. The vivid visions of my childhood, the nobility of such, and the many intervening years, and Mr.Shorter's beyond-priceless value to my life, especially when considering his Bhuddist shared beliefs. This aspect of this towering artist/icon/idol of mine was also discovered later at another pivotal juncture in my life, along with Mr. Herbie Hancock, equally as much an idol among MANY others.Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jack Baker on April 22, 2008
Format: Audio CD
This 1966 session finds Wayne Shorter in fine form, leading a quartet comprised of Herbie Hancock (piano), Reggie Workman (bass), and Joe Chambers (drums). While I don't think this album is quite as powerful as Speak No Evil or Night Dreamer, this is still a strong set from Shorter, whose eclectic compositions never cease to astound. He wrote all of the pieces here, save "502 Blues (Drinkin' and Drivin'), contributed by Jimmy Rowles, a pianist Shorter admired and "The Collector", written by Hancock, which wasn't part of the original release. Shorter is outstanding as always, given more room to stretch out without another horn present. Also given more space here is Herbie Hancock, whose sprightly piano lines really give this album its character.

"Adam's Apple" is a groovy opener, which the updated liner notes seem to dismiss as Shorter's attempt at "The Sidewinder". I found the piece very enjoyable, if not as complex as some of Shorter's other work. "502 Blues" is lovely, more ballad than blues. My favorite on the album, it brings to mind driving at night under hazy streetlights. "El Gaucho" borrows from bossa nova, given a unique feel by Shorter. The highlight of the set is probably "Footprints", a Shorter masterpiece, probably more familiar in its Miles Smiles incarnation, but given an amazing reading here. The central sax riff is very haunting, backed by some dynamite bass work from Workman.
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