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Adje!Adje! CD


Price: $15.41 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
9 new from $1.55 8 used from $1.50
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Audio CD, CD, May 25, 2010
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$15.41 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Adje! Adje! 3:47$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Oleblemi 5:22$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Djalele 4:40$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Novi Nye 4:12$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Get Ready 4:37$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Let's March 5:25$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Lonlon 4:27$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Aiko 3:27$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Jondji 5:47$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen10. Madjo 4:01$0.99  Buy MP3 


Product Details


Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Review

The West African nation of Togo doesn't have the same reputation for churning out Afropop as countries such as Ghana, Mali and Nigeria. But D.C.-based Elikeh, fronted by Togolese singer-guitarist Massama Dogo, is seeking to change that with its mix of Afrofunk, highlife and roots -- a style it calls "Afro-high." Elikeh's new album, "Adje! Adje!," is a serious call to action that maintains a vibe of jubilant perseverance throughout. Dogo's lyrics, sung primarily in a blend of French and the African languages Ewe and Mina, are layered over rhythms from percussionist Joseph "Papa Jo" Ngwa and drummer Tosin Aribisala and copious amounts of guitar from Michael Shereikis, John Lee and Dogo himself. The title track is political cautionary tale, while "Oleblemi" is all joyful, skittering horns and '70s Afrorock influences. On "Madjo," Dogo's beautiful voice is served with nothing more than soft guitar accompaniment, while the near-five-minute "Get Ready," an instrumental punctuated by a few exuberant shouts, puts on full display the rhythms of Afrofunk. Dogo has said that getting play in Togo, with its focus on the sounds of other countries rather than its own, is difficult, but hopefully tracks like "Let's March," which has Elikeh modifying a piece from Nigeria's Orlando Julius Ekemode in its own style, will soon be heard, as the songs says, from Lomé to D.C. --Washington Post

Togo s music scene is not one of west Africa s best-known, and Massama Dogo had to move to Washington to get off the ground his fusion of Togolese styles and Western rock. Adje! Adje! is a great calling card. Dogo s angry songs about corruption and exile are set against ringing guitars and slow-burning underwater Afrobeat, or Togo s agbadja rhythm, which echoes roots reggae. Aiko is dreamy anthemic southern tumewe . On the closing Madjo , Dogo s delicate acoustic guitar accompanies a rap from his Malian neighbour Yeli Fezzo. --Financial Times

There's a photo of Elikeh singer/guitarist Massama Dogo on the inset of his band's recent album, Adje! Adje!, that immediately captures your attention. The man is standing during performance, guitar strapped around his shoulder, whistle in mouth, eyes wide through glasses staring out into the crowd beyond. It is a determined and fixed stare, one necessary to navigate through the political world of Washington DC. Yes, music obviously has its politics, but Dogo also refers back to his homeland for influence, the tiny West African Togolese Republic, a 22,000-square-mile enclave wedged between Benin and Ghana with a population of 6.7 million. Yes, shades of Ghana's music, not to mention a little Nigerian Afrobeat are included in this worthwhile ten-song outing, but make no mistake: it is a guitar-driven effort. No surprise, given that Dogo once lead a guitar ensemble in his home country. Don't think it's all rock; the soft strums on "Djalele" allow Dogo's rough, informal vocal style to shine. This is first and foremost a poetic effort, one that the man has injected plenty of feeling into. But yes, when he allows his guitar to rip atop the danceable, saxophone-led rhythm of the title track, you know where this band stands. More than Afrobeat, Elikeh reminds me more of the great guitar-driven Senegalese dance bands that Orchestra Baobab exemplifies. Infusing an upbeat local style, agbadja, underneath the hard pulse of "Novi Nne" and "Get Ready," as well as singing in four languages (Ewe, Mina, French, English), Dogo has assembled a worthy cast of musicians for this fine release, one I can only imagine as intense and determined as the photograph that represents the future he stares out into 06/07/10 >> --Huffington Post

Togo s music scene is not one of west Africa s best-known, and Massama Dogo had to move to Washington to get off the ground his fusion of Togolese styles and Western rock. Adje! Adje! is a great calling card. Dogo s angry songs about corruption and exile are set against ringing guitars and slow-burning underwater Afrobeat, or Togo s agbadja rhythm, which echoes roots reggae. Aiko is dreamy anthemic southern tumewe . On the closing Madjo , Dogo s delicate acoustic guitar accompanies a rap from his Malian neighbour Yeli Fezzo. --Financial Times

There's a photo of Elikeh singer/guitarist Massama Dogo on the inset of his band's recent album, Adje! Adje!, that immediately captures your attention. The man is standing during performance, guitar strapped around his shoulder, whistle in mouth, eyes wide through glasses staring out into the crowd beyond. It is a determined and fixed stare, one necessary to navigate through the political world of Washington DC. Yes, music obviously has its politics, but Dogo also refers back to his homeland for influence, the tiny West African Togolese Republic, a 22,000-square-mile enclave wedged between Benin and Ghana with a population of 6.7 million. Yes, shades of Ghana's music, not to mention a little Nigerian Afrobeat are included in this worthwhile ten-song outing, but make no mistake: it is a guitar-driven effort. No surprise, given that Dogo once lead a guitar ensemble in his home country. Don't think it's all rock; the soft strums on "Djalele" allow Dogo's rough, informal vocal style to shine. This is first and foremost a poetic effort, one that the man has injected plenty of feeling into. But yes, when he allows his guitar to rip atop the danceable, saxophone-led rhythm of the title track, you know where this band stands. More than Afrobeat, Elikeh reminds me more of the great guitar-driven Senegalese dance bands that Orchestra Baobab exemplifies. Infusing an upbeat local style, agbadja, underneath the hard pulse of "Novi Nne" and "Get Ready," as well as singing in four languages (Ewe, Mina, French, English), Dogo has assembled a worthy cast of musicians for this fine release, one I can only imagine as intense and determined as the photograph that represents the future he stares out into 06/07/10 >> --Huffington Post

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