Adland: Searching for the Meaning of Life on a Branded Pl... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.50
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by rustyrivermedia
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Eligible for FREE SUPER SAVER SHIPPING!! Amazon customer service AND delivery tracking! This book is in overall acceptable condition! Missing dust jacket. Wear on corners and edges.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Adland: Searching for the Meaning of Life on a Branded Planet Hardcover – September 15, 2009


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.76 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Series: Developments in biological standardization
  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday (September 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 038552496X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385524964
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,690,126 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The life of an advertising executive couldn't be further from the glamorous world of Mad Men, according to this entertaining, albeit meandering, memoir. After a giddy beginning banging out copy for a small ad agency, Othmer, a longtime creative director and copywriter, worked his way to the top in 2000 only to discover that his traditional agency was being abandoned in favor of forward-thinking brand stewards who wanted hip new ideas from smaller shops well-versed in new media and digital marketing. Fascinated by groundbreaking interactive campaigns like the 2007 Nine Inch Nails Internet Easter egg hunt and Burger King's Subservient Chicken gag, he found his love for advertising reinvigorated, and his book is an effort to better understand the inescapable industry's influence on culture. Though there's no particular conclusion drawn, and the story itself wanders, the humor and genuine excitement that shine through may keep some media-world readers interested—most tellingly when, at a swanky party full of advertising executives, the author wistfully observes that even real life has begun to feel fake. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Othmer uses his often hilarious experiences to discuss the stress-fueled environment advertising springs from, how its message is targeted to consumers, and how branding can actually be a good thing … [His] engaging dissection of advertising gives consumers valuable insight into how companies manipulate messages to convince us to give them our money.” –Kirkus Reviews

"An enjoyable and profound read....It resonates with everything we love about this industry, everything we hate, everything that keeps us working in it, everything that makes us want to leave and everything that makes us believe in what could still be possible." --Advertising Age

“What Upton Sinclair did for meatpacking, Jim Othmer has done for advertising–only with far more humor and far less (physical) horror. Adland is destined to become a classic of its kind–a must-read for anyone brave (or insane or aimless) enough to toil in the fields of modern advertising.” –Daniel H. Pink, author of A Whole New Mind

“Advertising is an industry like any other, except it changes our planet daily. James Othmer, one of my favorite writers, takes you inside that world and makes the people and places real. You can dislike these guys, but you can’t ignore them. They make sure of that.” –Seth Godin, author of Tribes

“Othmer is a witty and charming tour guide who chats self-deprecatingly about his own Adland epiphanies and humiliations while leading us inexorably toward the birthing room of Advertising Next. A terrific introduction to what advertising has been and what it is becoming, a memoir-manifesto with warmth and insight, and a must-read for those contemplating entering the industry.” –Max Berry, bestselling author of Company

“For nearly half a century, David Ogilvy’s Confessions of an Advertising Man has served as the Old Testament for an industry. Now there’s a new one: James Othmer’s Adland. Fully aware of (but not made giddy by) the many changes that have brought advertising from the classical Age of Ogilvy to our current era of the digital baroque, Othmer describes the art of commerce with the insight of an insider and the bemusement of a novelist.” –Robert Thompson, professor of popular culture, Syracuse University, and author of Prime Time, Prime Movers

“From pitches in corporate boardrooms to beers at the Gutter Bar, Adland is a highly enjoyable romp through the world of advertising. Othmer’s writing on the industry is both vivid and poignant, with a lot a humor sprinkled in for good measure.” –John Gerzema, chief insights officer, Young & Rubicam, author of The Brand Bubble

“I’ve been in advertising more than twenty years and have spent countless hours trying to tell people how insane and hilarious and exciting and pointless and fascinating it all is. Now all I have to do is hand them this book.” –Jamie Barrett, creative director/partner, Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco

"Working in advertising can often be like the worst of reality TV – it’s like 'Survivor', 'Deadliest Catch' and 'The Apprentice' rolled up into one - and that’s on a good day. It takes a real writer to turn the farce into prose and yet keep a true perspective that allows the great moments to shine through. Having worked with Jim on farce, fantasy and some fantastic creative – I for one was mesmerized by our own doings – I have no doubt you will be too” – David Sable, Vice Chairman, COO, Wunderman Worldwide


"ADLAND pulls back the curtain on the advertising industry giving the reader an inside look at this oftentimes exciting, crazy, discouraging, and exhilarating business. With a unique blend of humor and insight, Othmer guides us through this rapidly changing business and lets us see the direction in which it is headed. A must read for any student of advertising." -- Rick Boyko, Director, VCU Brandcenter

Related Media


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
PLEASE consider buying and enjoying this fascinating book.
Cholula
It is very funny to see how the author reacts to such a soul sucking environment that is the ad agency.
Patrick T. Kilgallon
A very funny, realistic account of the ups and downs of the advertising world.
Patricia Wollman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By JackYee on September 18, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Thoroughly enjoyed this fast moving tale. Hilarious, quick witted telling of the internal workings of advertising. Reminiscent and researched account of advertising's evolution from Darrin Stevens to Product Branding.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan E. Evison on September 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover
James P. Othmer is one of the funniest writers at work today. Period. His keen eye for the absurdities of the modern world rivals the likes of George Saunders and Sam Lipsyte. You could sharpen knives on Othmer's sentences.

Prior to his 2006 debut novel, The Futurist, Jimbo was honing his mad skills in the advertising racket, as an exec at Young & Rubicam. And though I daresay it was a colossal waste of his talents, I, for one, am glad he endured it, or we wouldn't have Adland, a hilarious and insightful chronicle of the rise and fall of a modern ad man.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Patricia Wollman on September 17, 2009
Format: Hardcover
A very funny, realistic account of the ups and downs of the advertising world. Where its been and where its going. Bright, sharp, entertaining & informative. A must read for those considering the Marketing/Advertising field & those who were/are a part of the Ad Land.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Larry Underwood on October 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover
James Othmer's witty & satirical look at the world of advertising is a fascinating and most compelling expose. It also demonstrates why conventional advertising campaigns and public relations strategies are changing faster than a speeding tweet on Twitter.

We've entered an age of internet information; businesses are moving away from conventional forms of advertising (bad news for newspapers, television & radio) in search of ways to actively engage their customers in the marketing process. The platforms are varied---from Facebook to Twitter---and the feedback is vital in helping them establish effective brand recognition.

Of course, it didn't used to be that way. Commercial television's advertising campaigns were rarely creative; for the most part, they were comprised of tired platitudes and bland voice-overs. Occasionally, some campaigns became tremendous hits, although many, such as Wendy's "Where's the Beef?" irritated people as much as entertained them. Othmer's hilariously satirical mock depictions of certain aspects of advertising will leave you rolling on the floor with laughter; literally.

In the end, the message delivered by Othmer becomes one of ethics and practicality. Is it worth it to be part of a dubious ad campaign that violates an individual's basic core values? Nowadays, would anyone even be listening?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Marketing Guy Who Drives Sales -r on August 25, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
James Othmer takes the reader through the advertising industry as it was 20 years ago until the dawn of the digital age through his own eyes and experiences as an industry insider. He is a talented writer and this book will be difficult to put down if you are a marketing, branding or advertising wonk. Heck, even if you simply enjoy watching the ads during the Super Bowl you'll enjoy this book.

Othmer takes you back in time when the large, traditional ad agencies were at their peak creating consumer perceptions and delivering sales for clients. He takes you back to a fascinating and sometimes absurd world of excess, manipulation, craziness, greed, hard work and irrational exuberance dotted with flashes of brilliance and unmatched creativity. 30-second TV ads ruled the land and advertising execs fell prey to the human tendency to believe that the good times were here to stay and that the money would just keep rolling in from clients forever. He tells first-hand stories of his experiences and his cynicism belies the fact that he is actually on the path to redemption by deconstructing the digital revolution, honestly assessing the stumbling of traditional ad agencies and seeking ethical recovery in present and future advertising and brand building practices.

The last few chapters have you staring into the light of the future by looking at how savvy marketers are now engaging with consumers in ways never before imagined using media and strategies that none of us envisioned just a few years ago. He gets to the heart when he recounts a statement made by Rick Boyko, former chief creative officer of Ogilvy & Mather and now professor at VCU's Brandcenter when Boyko states, "Now more than ever the brand steward isn't the corporation or the agency, it's the consumer.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bob G. - author, investor, entrepreneur on January 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
James Othmer is at his best in Adland when he offers a wide-eyed, insider's view of the ad agency industry that he has experienced first hand. The sad stories of lost pitches and bad bosses offer what "Ogilvy on Advertising" forgot to mention. Then, his exploration of the future of marketing and advertising presents a well-researched and well-thought-out range of possibilities. The book is a must-read for traditional marketing and advertising people who are trying to figure out where the market is going and how to hit the personal reset button. But it is also a LOL ride through an ad agency business that we know so well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?