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Adolf in Wonderland Paperback – December 18, 2007


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Paperback, December 18, 2007
$192.31

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Eraserhead Press (December 18, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933929618
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933929613
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 5.4 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,247,503 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap


"Easily the craziest, weirdest, strangest, funniest, most obscene writer in America." - GOTHIC MAGAZINE

"Carlton Melick III exemplifies the intelligence and wit that lurks between its lurid covers. In a genre where crude titles are an art in themselves, Mellick is a true artist." - THE GUARDIAN

"Just as Pop had Andy Warhol and Dada Tristan Tzara, the Bizarro movement has its very own P. T. Barnum-type practitioner. He's the mutton-chopped author of such books as Electric Jesus Corpse and The Menstruating Mall, the illustrator, editor, and instructor of all things Bizarro, and his name is Carlton Mellick III." - DETAILS MAGAZINE

From the Back Cover

Praise for Carlton Mellick III

"Easily the craziest, weirdest, strangest, funniest, most obscene writer in America."
- GOTHIC MAGAZINE

"Carlton Mellick III has the craziest book titles... and the kinkiest fans!"
- CHRISTOPHER MOORE, author of The Stupidest Angel

"If you haven't read Mellick you're not nearly perverse enough for the twenty first century."
- JACK KETCHUM
, author of The Woman and The Girl Next Door

"Carlton Mellick III is one of bizarro fiction's most talented practitioners, a virtuoso of the surreal, science fictional tale."
- CORY DOCTOROW, author of Little Brother

"Bizarre, twisted, and emotionally raw--Carlton Mellick's fiction is the literary equivalent of putting your brain in a blender."
- BRIAN KEENE, author of The Rising and Dead Sea

"Carlton Mellick III exemplifies the intelligence and wit that lurks between its lurid covers. In a genre where crude titles are an art in themselves, Mellick is a true artist."
- THE GUARDIAN

"Just as Pop had Andy Warhol and Dada Tristan Tzara, the Bizarro movement has its very own P. T. Barnum-type practitioner. He's the mutton-chopped author of such books as Electric Jesus Corpse and The Menstruating Mall, the illustrator, editor, and instructor of all things Bizarro, and his name is Carlton Mellick III."
- DETAILS MAGAZINE
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Like a real world Kilgore Trout, cult author CARLTON MELLICK III has been pumping out some of the weirdest, trashiest, most imaginative books that you'll never want to admit you secretly love.

His books are released on a quarterly basis (every January, April, July, and October).

Best known as one of the leading authors of the bizarro fiction movement in literature, he is also one of the most prolific authors of his generation with over 40 books in print since 2001. He won the Wonderland Book Award for his novel "Warrior Wolf Women of the Wasteland" and has had short stories make it into The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror and The Best Bizarro Fiction of the Decade.

Although many of his earliest works are on the surreal and experimental side, his current style is to take the most ridiculous concepts imaginable and approach them with complete sincerity, as if they are not intended to be ridiculous at all. Always full of tongue-in-cheek humor, social satire, and told in a simplistic straightforward prose style similar to that of children's literature or early pulp fiction, Carlton Mellick III's work is one of a kind, to say the least.

He lives in Portland, OR, the bizarro mecca.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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See all 29 customer reviews
As a result, reading one of his books is very much like watching a movie.
J. Krall
That style is what makes this book enjoyable, and parts of this book are truly fantastic because of that strangeness that Mellick excels at.
Alex Jerison
Mellick's bizarre worlds and bizarre characters take over your mind and the journey is inevitable.
Schtinky

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By J. Krall on February 20, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Let me start by saying that I'm a big fan of Carlton Mellick III and so I started reading already expecting to like it.

That being said, this review will be a fair one.

If you do not know anything about the literary genre known as Bizarro, then you should probably look into that first to see if this is your cup of tea. Otherwise, you may be totally taken for a loop and then feel the need to come on here to give it a bad review based on its "weirdness". (I've seen that happen with other bizarro books on here.)

Yes, ADOLF IN WONDERLAND is weird. It's supposed to be. But it is not weird for the sake of being weird. There is a method to the strangeness that is inside. This time it is a cross between Kafka and Alice in Wonderland in an alternate version of our world. It has the quality of a children's book meaning that the moving of the plot as well as the dialogue has that simplistic quality that you will often find in children's literature. Because of this, it may turn some readers off. There isn't much in the way of character development or in depth background. It's not that the author is deficient in his writing skills. The tone of this book called for that. Again, it's like a children's book written for adults.

The dialogue though having that simplistic quality is also very absurd and humorous. There are quite a few "laugh out loud" passages.

Imagery. One of the author's strengths overall is his ability to create striking images of strange people, places, and things. It's amazing. He doesn't need to write a whole long-winded paragraph describing a character in order to make it clear in our minds. He has mastered the ability to use his words in a precise manner. As a result, reading one of his books is very much like watching a movie.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David W Barbee on December 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
I've read many of Carlton Mellick's books and I have to say that each one shows us unique and strange worlds, and yet all of them are distinctly his. Adolf in Wonderland is no exception. Here Mellick is riffing on Lewis Carroll's classic, but he throws in the themes of Nazism and perfection as a stark contrast to a weird world where normal just doesn't exist.

Reading Adolf in Wonderland feels like tumbling down the rabbit hole itself, twisting in an ever downward spiral. The story warps and turns, and of the few things that are explained, they don't make logical sense (it all makes perfect nonsense, though). Just as one surreal, scary, and disgusting situation screams past, Adolf is thrown into another that is even more strange, more sick, and more twisted.

All the while Adolf balks at the bizarre and, right up to the very end, believes that he can still accomplish his mission despite the enormous setbacks. The point, as the afterword says, is that the more emphasis that we put on perfection, the harder it becomes to attain. As Adolf falls farther and farther into an abyss of strangeness, we get the feeling that we're being dragged along by our ears with him, tripping over all the weird stuff.

Little of this story makes sense, but then again, that's the point. I think Mellick wrote Adolf in Wonderland as a sort of experiment in bizarro. To see what the genre is capable of in terms of putting forth, dare I say it, literary meaning. The point of the story comes across quite well, and the bizarro style is clearly evident, but I feel the plot suffers from a lack of structure that Mellick's other books clearly had. Everything is kind of jumbled up with no sense of order.......

....but then again, that's the point.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Schtinky VINE VOICE on March 16, 2008
Format: Paperback
When you're a fan of the bizarro genre, this is your cup of tea. Reading 'Adolf In Wonderland' was like taking an acid trip. Mellick's bizarre worlds and bizarre characters take over your mind and the journey is inevitable.

In a world where Hitler has won and perfection rules the world, two SS officers are dropped of at a deserted train station in search of a town that contains an imperfect being to be eradicated. All they find is a miniature, deserted doll town before both officers disappear.

The youngest wakes up as the sole resident of a local bar. The bartender calls him Adolf because the name Adolf Hitler is on his uniform. His briefcase is missing, along with most of his memories. Adolf is in Wonderland, or should I say Freako-Land. This is a world where Dakar spiders can shrink you down to eat you, where there's tiny buglike cockroach people, and Sadness Daemons who live in the walk-in mirrors. Adolf is in Wonderland, and he's going to go down the rabbit hole. In the Inn next to the bar, he meets the innkeeper who puts him up in a room with a whale-like sleeping fat man and a ghost who doesn't think she's a ghost. Adolf can't sleep, all he can remember is the he must find his briefcase to hunt down the Imperfect Man.

After finding The Perfect Woman, Adolf is shrunk by a Dakar spider and brought into an entirely different realm. There are imperfect beings everywhere, but where is the one he's looking for. All kinds of things will happen to Adolf, including being co-joined to a warthog-man while trying to get into the castle to talk to the Golden Eel. I don't want to give away the whole book, but it's a wild trip.
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