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Adoptable Dog: Teaching Your Adopted Pet to Obey, Trust, and Love You Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (February 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393050793
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393050790
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,122,515 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Authors of three other books on pets, including Puppy Preschool, Ross and McKinney know that many people want to adopt homeless dogs, and here outline the advantages and disadvantages. Adopting, the authors say, is generally cheaper than going to a breeder, but important details such as the health of the animal, its background and its behavior may be hard to come by when the animal comes from a humane society, shelter or rescue group. A puppy from a breeder will often already be trained, while the person who is adopting needs to do some research into the dog's background. In considering which animal, if any, will be the right fit, the authors encourage readers to think about such issues as the size of the house, whether they can afford veterinary care, temperament of the family and whether neighbors would mind a dog's barking. The rest of the book is primarily devoted to training issues such as disciplining and handling dogs who have been abused. This is a useful book that should be read by people before they start looking at dogs and "falling in love" with a particular one.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Helps you give your 'pre-owned' dog a good, loving home. -- Dog Fancy, May 2003 issue

Information to help...owners deal with the special needs and training issues of adopted dogs. -- Dog & Kennel, August 2003

This excellent guide offers hope and advice that can help save some of the two million dogs euthanized...every year. -- BookPage, Lynn Green, 1 July 2003

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 8 customer reviews
Solutions to those problems are clear and steps easy to follow.
Nicole De Loncre
I recommend it for anyone with an adopted dog or thinking of adopting.
Happy reader
This book was a good refresher course, and had some good new tips.
S. Hess

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Bernese Lover on July 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book was recommended to me by some fellow rescue workers. I'm an experienced rescue worker and dog breeder.
I fully recommend this book to those who:
1. Are new to rescue dogs.
2. Need to know some of the typical behaviors a rescue dog may exhibit.
3. Need a refresher course on foundational basics of rehabilitating rescue dogs.
4. Need affirmation about good methods used in modifying negative dog behaviors.
5. Want to rehabilitate any dog that exhibits negative or undesired behavior(s).

To the experienced dog rescue workers like me, this book offers nothing new. It may be obvious to some readers that this author has spent many years in dog training but not indepth actual shelter work. However,I was happy to see that, although the author lacked a lot of personal shelter experience, he had invested and employed a good amount of homework and research worthy of a useful book. Through his writing, I could read the experienced views of shelter workers he'd interviewed prior to writing this book.
This book is written fairly simply. The author wrote very much as if he were standing next to you talking with you. His verbiage is simple and easy to understand. He uses case-in-point examples that are helpful in clarifying his point and method.
Occasionally, the author would title a paragraph where I expected to get much more out of the following text than what was present. On these instances, I felt like I was left hanging and looking for more.
On the whole, I was delighted to find the author's approach to be factual, experienced, compassionate, common sense and fairly comprehensive.
I really enjoyed reading the author's common sense views when he addressed some of the dog world's trendy idealisms.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Maribeth on April 18, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a 4 year volunteer dog walker/trainer at my local humane society and also the owner of two adopted dogs, I found this book useful and straightforward. At the shelter we see many people with unrealistic ideas of what to expect from our shelter dogs (this applies to any dog whether it's a shelter dog or from a responsible breeder or from any of the myriad of other sources.) This book explains some of the issues that can come up and gives practical advice on addressing the issues. I also like the fact that the owners give information on training a pet dog, rather than "obedience" training. This book gives solid advice to people who just want to have a good relationship with their new dog. The writers stress the importance of structure and clarity when communicating with your new dog.
As the owner of two adopted dogs, I will tell you that it takes effort and I will also tell you that I wouldn't have it any other way. What you get back from these dogs far outweighs the effort that goes in. If you are thinking of getting a dog, whether it be "adopted" or purchased, please do some homework first and understand the type of dog you are getting and examine your expectations and then decide if you want to go through with the decision which is a long commitment.
All that being said, if you decide you want to share your life with a dog, please VISIT YOUR LOCAL ANIMAL SHELTER and check out what they have. You'll be surprised. You will find purebred dogs, adult dogs who have good manners, young adult dogs "who need a little training", puppies and some marvelous mixes of all shapes and sizes. Some of these dogs have "baggage" and "issues" which will need some work, but many of them just got dealt a bad hand and it just didn't work out at their first home.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 28, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I found this book to be exptremely informative, easy to understand, and fun to read. There are a lot of unknowns when it comes to adopting a dog -- especially for us first-time dog owners. This book really tackled the big questions I had as well as had easy-to-follow step-by-step training exercises.
The author is obviously very much in favor of his own training methods, but he at least explains why he thinks they are the best in order for the reader to research and make up their own mind.
I would recommend reading this book to anyone thinking about adopting a dog!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Hess on July 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
My husband and I had both grown up with dogs, but during college and our first few years in the work force, knew we didn't have time to give a dog the full attention it needed. So when I had some time off and we decided to get a dog, we were both a bit rusty. This book was a good refresher course, and had some good new tips. The training chapters were basic--but basics are really all you need if you're not going to be showing or putting your dog through agility trials. I thought that it was particularly useful that the authors talked about correcting ingrained behaviors often seen in adult dogs who haven't been given structure in their previous homes. In the end, though, there are a lot of questions I still have. I feel as though there was a lot of wind-up about what to expect in a shelter dog, but not as much detailed follow-through about some things. The advice on crate-training, for example, was pretty thin. All in all, though, I enjoyed reading it and it gave me enough information that I was prepared when we got the call about our rescue dog.
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