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The Adventures of Sir Gawain the True (The Knights’ Tales Series) Hardcover – April 18, 2011


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The Adventures of Sir Gawain the True (The Knights’ Tales Series) + The Adventures of Sir Balin the Ill-Fated (The Knights’ Tales Series)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4
  • Lexile Measure: 770L (What's this?)
  • Series: The Knights’ Tales Series (Book 3)
  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers (April 18, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0547418558
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547418551
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #959,792 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An ingeniously integrated retelling of Gawain and the Green Knight and other episodes from the Arthurian canon. Worthy reading for all budding squires and damsels."—Kirkus Reviews, starred review



The Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great

"Rejoice, fans of the Squire’s Tales, Morris is finally bringing his terrific recastings of Arthurian legend to a younger audience...More, please."—Kirkus, starred review

"The art catches the tone of the writing in the often-amusing ink drawings. A promising series debut for young readers."—Booklist

"The book's brevity and humor make it accessible to reluctant readers, and it is a fantastic read-aloud."—School Library Journal

"This trim novel, with simple vocabulary and brief, witty chapters, is an ideal fit for early readers...but fans of the legendary characters may find particular delight in this irreverent and unabashedly silly exploration of Arthur's court and his most influential knight."—The Bulletin


The Adventures of Sir Givret the Short

"...sure to please young readers enamored with medieval derring-do."—School Library Journal

 

The Adventures of Sir Gawain The True

"Broad humor, graced with lively language will have readers laughing along with this boisterous Arthurian adventure."—Yellow Brick Road

About the Author

When Gerald Morris was in fifth grade he loved Greek and Norse mythology and before long was retelling the stories to his younger sister and then to neighborhood kids. He began carrying a notebook in which he kept some of the details related to the different stories. The joy he found in retelling those myths continued when he discovered other stories. According to Gerald Morris, “I never lost my love of retelling the old stories. When I found Arthurian literature, years later, I knew at once that I wanted to retell those grand tales. So I pulled out my notebook . . . I retell the tales, peopling them with characters that I at least find easier to recognize, and let the magic of the Arthurian tradition go where it will.” Gerald Morris lives in Wausau, Wisconsin, with his wife and their three children. In addition to writing he serves as a minister in a church.


Aaron Renier was born and raised in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and attended art school in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He's drawn comics as far back as he can remember, and today he has found a very vibrant and supportive community of cartoonists in Chicago, where he currently resides. Renier is the recipient of the Will Eisner Comic Industry Award for Talent Deserving Wider Recognition, and received a nomination for best Children's Album in 2005.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 31 customer reviews
This is a fun book that young readers will enjoy.
Patricia
I did have to explain a few words and concepts to them, but overall it is well written and easy to read.
Shane Lems
The story is broken up into very easy to read chapters that each tell a logical part of the events.
CandysRaves (and Rants)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Shane Lems VINE VOICE on March 8, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This review is for the Amazon Vine program.

Like the previous two reviews earlier than mine, I agree: this is a good book. I read it to my boys who are 5 and 8, and though it probably is better for the 8-10 age group, we still enjoyed it quite a bit. I did have to explain a few words and concepts to them, but overall it is well written and easy to read. There are 10 short chapters, and each chapter contains one or two illustrations. I asked my boys what I should rate this, and they said "we really really liked it." I think that means 5 stars!

I gave it 4 stars for these minor reasons: 1) it is quite short and simple (simplistic?) and 2) a major part of the story line has to do with getting heads chopped off. I realize older kids or kids who have been exposed to tons of killings on TV might not flinch at this, but we did. I suppose this note is more for those parents who wonder if the content is appropriate. Other than the chopping off of a head in the story line, it is pretty mild and not too dark/scary. It even ends with a good moral tone.

In summary, the book is worth reading, especially if the reader enjoys tales of knights, chivalry, humor, wit, action, and those with a decent moral lesson (namely, friendship/kindness is better than victory at all costs).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mark P. Brown VINE VOICE on April 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is book three of a series known as the Knight's Tales. It also follows ten books in something known as the squire's series. Series books have a well worn formula and this one is no exception. Each Chapter is a self contained and natural stopping point. The book overall has a virtue it and presumably the parent would like to form in the young reader. In Sir Gawain that virtue is courtesy. Through a series of adventures and characters, the main character - read the young child's stand in - explores how one lives the virtue and comes to a recognition that it is good. Technically this book is superior to many series books. The illustrations are engaging and help the words. The pace is quick. The vocabulary is appropriate. The virtue actually a virtue and not some modern cause. The writing is witty.

And that might be the problem. The book reads like King Arthur meets The Princess Bride. A post-modern irony drips throughout the story such that the virtue attempting to be promoted is lost in the snark. In attempting to update the King Arthur story the magic and whimsy seem to have been strained out. What is left is a very modern Sir Gawain and the Knights of the Round Table, but a story that forgets the child. Middle boy child in our family loves stories and has trouble letting them go in the middle. I was excited to introduce to him King Arthur. I read to him the first two chapters and put the book down without a grumble from him. When I asked the next night if we should continue, which would normally have been met with an excited yes, I was met with a no, read something else.

On the one hand, Sir Gawain is much better than I would have expected of a children's series. On the other, it seems to be missing the key ingredient.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This short novel tells the adventures of King Arthur's greatest knight--Sir Gawain the Undefeated. Though he has never lost a battle or contest, Gawain still has lessons to learn in order to become a true knight in Arthur's court. A knight is not only a good fighter, but he is also courteous (especially to women) and always true to his word. The author, Gerald Morris, does a nice job of illustrating these facts through his Gawain story. (There is some similarity to the original "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight", but most of the details are different.) In this story Gawain, in true knightly fashion, rescues a damsel from a dragon; but, his manners are shown to be lacking when he does not even bother to ask her name, or where she would like him to take her. King Arthur calls him to task for this lack of courtesy.

Next, on the seventh day of the Christmas feast, a huge bizarre knight--completely green--bursts in on the court and demands that someone play a "game" of exchanging blows with him. Gawain is chosen to represent the court, and the green knight gives him his ax so that he can chop off his head, and Gawain reluctantly obliges. Obviously there is magic in the air because the green knight simply picks up his head and before riding out of Camelot, tells Gawain to meet him at Green Chapel in one year so that he can have his turn at his blow. The rest of the book is about what happens as the appointed meeting time draws near and then what actually happens at Green Chapel. Naturally Gawain is fearful of having his head chopped off, but, on the other hand, he MUST go to Green Chapel because he has given his word. And a knight always keeps his word. He has some interesting adventures on his way that further test just how true to his word he really is.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sue Morris from Kid Lit Reviews on July 15, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Sir Gawain the Undefeated is riding comfortably upon his horse when he hears the shrieks of a damsel in distress. A dragon with fiery breath has captured the fair maiden. Sir Gawain fights off the dragon, saving the damsel. No longer in distress, Sir Gawain decides the she no longer needs his assistance and begins to ride off. The damsel is so thankful that she wants to give Sir Gawain her treasured green sash. He refuses to accept. She then offers a kiss on the check, simply to say thank you. Again, Sir Gawain refuses and rides off, leaving the damsel where he found her. This is the precursor to the rest of the story.

In King Author's court, he requires his knights to be comfortable iron suits and sharp swords, just like any knight. They must also be courteous and respectful while doing their knightly duties. After relating the dragon fight, at dinner that night, Sir Gawain is flabbergasted to learn of his rudeness. The King thought it rude Sir Gawain refused the damsel's gift of thanks not once, but twice. Shameful knight behavior.

Later, at the Christmas Feast, the Green Knight crashes the party to challenge a knight, specifically Sir Gawain, to a strange dual. Sir Gawain is to go first. He swings and knocks the Green Knight's head clean off his neck. The Green Knight will strike Sir Gawain, in the same fashion, in exactly one year. As the year goes by, Sir Gawain and the King decide the Green Knight must have used magic. How else could his head continue to speak after it was severed from his neck? King Arthur and his knights leave the kingdom in search of the great Merlin the Enchanter. If anyone can help Sir Gawain keep his head attached, it is Merlin.
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