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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on March 21, 2000
Have you read Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn? If not, then I highly recommend you do. Mark Twain sure knew what he was doing when he wrote Huck Finn. He was sending out a message to the world. As Huck once said "Humans can be awful mean to each other". I believe that this is the message that Mark Twain wanted to get across. An ignorant little boy, Huck Finn, defies all that he knows when rescuing Jim. He even recognizes that we are all the same underneath the skin; we are all human. Huckleberry Finn is the most unlikely hero. As aforesaid, he was ignorant and unconventional. Knowing nothing, he set out into the world and had amazing adventures. He might have been uneducated but he certainly knew what was most important in life. As a literary piece, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is amazing. It drags a bit in the middle but it picks up again and has the perfect ending. If you haven't read it, read it now. It will enlighten you and enrich your knowledge more than you can imagine. Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn will always have a place on my bookshelf.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 12, 2006
I read Huckleberry Finn just this year! Of course I heard about the book and references to it all my life. I guess I had to take the plunge. And what a joyful ride it was! I liked these two chaps- one white and free another black and slave- on the run so alone under the sun and stars. At the same time they are chasing their own wild dreams and adventures.

Humour is spread all over the book and it often takes quirky turns. I can laugh at some very small bits from the beginning of the novel where Tom Sawyer makes an unsuccessful attempt to form a gang of robbers, towards the end of book where impish Tom kisses his own aunt on the lips under disguise of some other boy and Jim being supplied with all sorts of insects and snakes while in captivity.

But what makes this story great is the noble theme that runs throughout the book. Society's inhuman and exploitative nature and human heart's own capacity for love, compassion and friendship, above all. As we see in the book human compassion and friendship triumphs over greed, malevolence and injustice of an unjust and small hearted society.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I had to read this book in my Final Year at High School and my English Teacher's endless lectures on this book did nothing to spoil my enjoyment of this great novel. In this novel the reader is introduced to Huckleberry Finn, a young free spirited boy. Tired of the endles constraints of so called "Civilised Society" Huck "lights out" on a raft with his escaped slave friend Jim.What follows is a series of adventures with a few twists and turns in the plot which are all deftly handled by Mr. Twain. My English teacher had the criticism that the book was spoiled by the last few chapters when Jim becomes a steroetypical member of his Race. I believe that in doing this Mr. Twain was trying to point out to the reader that Huck and Jim were equals only when they were alone aboard their raft and as soon as the inevitaable demands of Society are placed on them Jim is no longer Huck's equal.This is a sad indictment on the concept of Society as it was back then. I never get tired of reading this book!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on October 8, 2000
I received Paul Newman's reading of the Adventures of Tom Sawyer as a gift. It's a stunner, a wonderfully entertaining two and half-hours of fun and thrills. I enjoyed it so much I decided to get Jack Lemmon's companion reading of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Wow, this performance is so enthralling I listened to the entire audio book in one sitting. The book is written with Huckleberry Finn as the first person narrator. Who would have ever imaged it but Jack Lemmon is Huckleberry Finn. Two time Academy Award winner Lemmon's Huck is full of pluck and cunning, mischief and excitement when he escapes from his Pap, confronts the King and the Duke and plots with Tom Sawyer. His contrition after playing the mean joke of Jim after they separated in the fog is palpable. And the famous Lemmon mannerisms are everywhere in evidence. Mr. Lemmon seems to be enjoying every moment of Mark Twain's wry and wonderful writing; he makes the characters live. I really loved this.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 24, 2012
I must start by saying that although I do have a passionate love for literature, I am much more in tune with modern day epics than classics. I have recently finished Huck Fin for the second time, the first being my freshman year of college. This time around however, I enjoyed and understood it much more. I believe that although the language is a little rough around the edges, and at times slightly distracting to me, this book is an amazing tale of friendship and growth. The two boys go through a tremendous amount of change and learning experiences that most people can only hope to endure in a lifetime. I think that the first time I read this I was put off by the excessive use of the "N" word and couldn't see through to how, in spite of a few 'stereotypical' images that twain paints of Jim, wise and mature he really was. All in all I think it's a good read and Twain is an amazing Arthur if you simply open your mind to what he's trying to do with this novel!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 9, 2011
Huckleberry Finn was a great literary work published in 1885 and written by Mark Twain. One of the most positive things about the book would be that the reading level is not very advanced and that it shows us a glimpse of the past. Along with the reading level not being very advanced, the book itself is extremely well thought out, and brings the stories, characters, and imagery to life. One of the negatives is the amount of cursing that takes place throughout the book. This is a negative because it is at a children's reading level and it does not add any literary value to the book as a piece of history. The ugly but I believe necessary part of the book is the use of the n-word. This is a necessary part of the book because it shows to our children and everyone the meaning behind the word. If anything it makes the reader more understanding of the troubles that the slaves when though and understand the meaning of the word a little more deeply.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 6, 2013
This is a great series. Our 10-yr old boy totally loves them, they are one of the key reasons that last year he went up 3 reading levels over summer while literally everyone in his class lost a reading level or two.

Campfire Classics do preserve some of the original voice of the author in the text, and because of the classics chosen, are a good incentive to read. We also like the fact they have not been beaten to death with politically correctness stick - which is part of preserving the original voice of the author ... we appreciate the fact that this series keeps it relatively real.

Also good is the section at the end where Campfire classics provides a non-fiction section for the book - prehistoric life for The Land that Time Forgot, Slavery for Huck Finn, real-life mad scientists for Jekyll and Hyde ... again, keeping it relevant and real.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 24, 2012
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is arguably one of the most significant pieces in American Literature. Twain, in this masterpiece, highlights sensitive issues through the eyes of Huch Finn and Jim who is a run away slave. This controversy has caused many schools to ban this piece from its curriculum and has been reviewed by many as one of the most racist books of its time.
Mark Twain cleverly takes us on a run-away adventure and in doing so helps us understand the exceptence of slavery in Missouri in the 1830's. Ironically, Twain depicts American Society through the scope of Hucks care giver Mrs. Watson. Mrs. Watson is religious God seeking lady who illustrates lack of sympathy for the colored race. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an important piece of literature which should be read with an open mind.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 18, 1999
<sarcasm> I feel sorry for you poor children who are being *forced* to learn something about American history by reading the classic Huckleberry Finn. How dare these teachers use methods other than rote memorization to teach you about 19th century America? Shame, shame on them. </sarcasm>
At least children, being children, can be excused for lack of prespective and/or attention span. What truly burns me is the *adult* children who take it upon themselves to *ban* books, such as Huck Finn, based solely on the presence of six-letter "n" words which they've been taught to hate -- without properly knowing why, as they haven't even bothered to read the hated book which best explains it. Shame on them.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
True, this novel is over the heads of many high school English students. This is the "darkest" American novel I know of, which is probably one of the reasons that induced Hemingway to say that American literature begins and ends here. Like Conrad's Marlowe, Huck is journeying "upriver" into a region of the human psyche best left unobserved by any but the most stalwart of heart. His eyes are opened on the voyage. His ultimate character is shaped by what he experiences. His is a passage from naivete to wide-opened observer.What begins as an idyllic raft trip turns more and more turbulent the closer to Illinois he gets. What begins as a Tom Sawyer lark becomes more and more Faulknerian. Yes,it is a voyage from inexperience to experience. Yes, it is a quest story. Yes, it is a novel about man's inhumanity to man, etc. etc. But there is so much more at work here..Twain shared much in common with Swift. We are looking primarily at the underbelly of humanity here, not its bright spots. The ending, as pointed out by numerous critics,is problematical. Exactly what is Huck's position vis-a-vis Jim? Has all that has occured previously been given up in the moment he is counseled by Tom? Is Huck so ready to overthrow his hard-fought allegiance in order to conform to society's dictums? Twain offers no clear resolution, but this should not keep this novel from being taught in high school or college classrooms, when students are given the liberty to consrtuct their own conclusions.Personally, I believe what Twain is telling us is that we can never exhibit our true natures in society without risking being stoned to death. Conventional pressures have not really changed that much from Twain's day to the present. Just by espousing my support for this novel I am opening myself up to criticism aimed my way from the righteously correct. American society hasn't changed all that much. Religious piety and indignation has been supplanted by political correctness. Harriet Beacher Stowe, bless her, is alive and well. There are people out there convinced that Uncle Tom's Cabin is a more significant work than Huck Finn. What would Vonnegut say here?
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