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Adventures in Jewish Cooking Hardcover – Bargain Price, September 3, 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Clarkson Potter; 1 edition (September 3, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0609610686
  • ASIN: B00104I6V0
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #495,759 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Anyone looking for new takes on Jewish cooking or fresh ideas for their kosher table will want to explore Adventures in Jewish Cooking. The book pushes the whole concept of Jewish cooking--let alone kosher restrictions--to the limit with inspired, internationally inflected dishes. Jeffrey Nathan, executive chef of Manhattan's acclaimed kosher restaurant Abigael's and host of the popular PBS cooking show New Jewish Cuisine, delivers all the standards of Jewish fare, but his Matzo Ball Soup is intensified with a spicy Latin American Soffrito and studded with saffron-infused matzo balls. His gefilte fish is a sophisticated terrine, adorned with jewel-like carrot and beet salads tossed with a tangy, sharp Horseradish Mustard Vinaigrette. Even his chicken soup is accented with Japanese miso paste. Besides updated versions of typical Jewish dishes, Nathan calls on his widely varied culinary experience to create kosher versions of more unexpected fare. Nori-Wrapped Salmon with Pea Shoot Salad would be impressive on any table--it's merely an added bonus that it also happens to be kosher. Turkey and Sausage Barley Jambalaya proves that pastrami, veal sausage, and turkey thighs can go head-to-head with the nonkosher meats normally found in this spicy Southern dish. Many of the dishes are impressive enough for the holiday table, making this a welcome resource for any cook looking for unusual takes on international cooking and those looking to add new dimensions to their kosher fare. --Robin Donovan --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

At last, Nathan has produced a companion volume to his PBS cooking show New Jewish Cuisine. Executive chef of the kosher Abigael's Restaurant in New York, Nathan offers a mix of traditional and modern recipes spiced with occasional personal anecdotes and asides. The book covers appetizers, soups, salads, meat, poultry, fish, breads and brunches and dessert. Many of Nathan's offerings, such as the Fennel-Crusted Snapper with Grapefruit-Cilantro Sauce, the Asian Duck Stir-Fry or the Crispy Creole Chicken Breasts, reflect recent food trends and diverse cultural influences. The time-honored "heritage recipes" are sometimes given a new twist, as with the Sweet Noodle and Fruit Kugel, which brims with the unusual combination of dried cranberries and other dried fruits rather than just the customary golden raisins. Taking into account Jewish dietary laws, each detailed recipe is designated "Meat," "Dairy" or "Pareve" (containing neither meat nor dairy products). Many dairy dishes, such as the refreshing Lemon Mousse with Blueberry Parfaits, include a pareve variation. Explanatory notes appear at the end of recipes and in sidebars sprinkled throughout the book; they cover such diverse subjects as toasting nuts and using raw eggs safely. Nathan rounds out the book with suggested holiday menus and sources for hard-to-find ingredients (such as the kosher version of Japanese rice wine). With surprises on every page, this truly innovative cookbook earns its name.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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That was one of the smarter things I ever did."
Judy Bart Kancigor
I can imagine how hard it was to create these recipes, then adapt them for the home; that hard work is certainly appreciated!
bullseye
I reccommend this book highly to kosher and non-kosher cooks.
"schaena1"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Larry Mark MyJewishBooksDotCom on September 7, 2002
Format: Paperback
Jeffrey Nathan. Is he a son of author, Joan Nathan? Nope, his mom is Harriet Nathan. Jeffrey Nathan. The executive chef at New York City's top kosher restaurant, Abigael's. You mean the chef isn't a woman named Abigael? Nope. Jeffrey Nathan. What does a former Navy cook know about kosher cooking? Plenty. Jeffrey Nathan. The most adventuresome, kosher celebrity chef? DEFINITELY! Growing up Jewish in an Italian neighborhood of Queens, NY, Nathan was exposed to unique dishes at home and at the neighbors. Having worked in kitchens since childhood, from Italian to Naval to Sephardic to "New Deal" wild-game, he knows a lot, and this CIA grad imparts it to the reader in breezy, interesting, chatty prose. Each recipe is tagged as Meat, Dairy, or Pareve, and is preceded by a few sentences about how it recipe was conceived.
Highlights include: A chopped liver in which the onions are browned in brandy (a secret to using a food processor is taught); a Vegetarian Chopped Liver using apples and corn flakes in addition to the familiar green beans; and Latin American Cerviche, a Passover alternative to gefilte fish that uses salmon and red snapper cut on a bias and served with a crunchy salsa salad that incorporates matzo with mango, jalapeno, peppers, citrus, and tomatoes.
Speaking of gefilte fish, try the Gefilte Fish Terrine with Carrots and Beet Salads. Familiar with lox and cream cheese? Try his Smoked Salmon Cheesecake with a bit of roasted pepper vinaigrette (he explains how to roast the peppers). There are recipes for 16 soups and stocks, including, of course, a classic Chicken Soup, as well as a miso variation, and a Sephardic variation with Sofrito and Saffron. Tired of chickens? Try Salmon Corn Chowder or his (dairy) Loaded Baked Potato Soup. Do salads bore you?
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By DML on December 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
The restaurant Abigael's is wonderful and now to have a cook book by the Chef is great. I've had the opportunity to attend a cooking class given by Chef Nathan and tried the recipes from the class with complete success. The recipes in the book are easily done at home. I tried the roasted lemon-rosemary chicken and it came out exactly as pictured in the book !!! My kids, ranging in age 6 - 11 devoured the chicken, normally I need to beg them to try something new. Not this time. The Creole Chicken is the best and so easy to make !!! The recipes are klutz proof and easily reproduced in a non-gourmet kitchen. This is a worthwhile investment or terrific gift. You don't have to be kosher to love the food.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "schaena1" on September 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have really enjoyed cooking from this new book. I am the designated cook for family gatherings and I am always looking for new and different ways to prepare traditional recipes. I found the book easy to follow, and the results as good as the pictures. I loved that Jeffrey gave resource for some of the more unusual ingredients found in the book. I reccommend this book highly to kosher and non-kosher cooks.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
After having, accidentally discovered Jeffrey Nathan's show on television (New Jewish Cusine), about 8 months age and became an avid viewer and an occational diner in his restaurant, "Abigael's on Broadway", I eagerly awaited his cookbook. The waiting was worth it. I've already made and enjoyed the ruggelah and various other desserts and am now starting on main dishes. The instructions are letter perfect and the results show that. ...I recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about cooking.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
Disagreement makes the world go 'round. But when I read a review that I know to be out-and-out unfair, I have to jump in and set the record straight.
I have happily cooked my way through this book. I do agree with the readers who found some of the recipes time-consuming and difficult to shop for. However, the book is not advertised as "fast and easy" cooking (a claim that many other chef's books falsely use with abandon), so I wasn't surprised to see many of Nathan's restaurant's signiature dishes appear. Restaurant cooking should be different than home cooking, and this book offers both. As I often cook plain as well as fancy, I like his approach. Being a fan of his TV show, I knew to expect a chef's sensibility towards food--and few of them, for better or worse, count ingredients or bowls!
What rankles me is how jsholkoff talks about the lack of instructions. Did we cook from the same book? I have made both chocolate mousses in the book. Chocolate Flowerpots (OK, I served them in bowls and not individual clay pots) is not made with a ganache. Could this reviewer mean Matzo Napoleons with White Chocolate Mousse? If so, the instructions are spot on. And no where in the book did I see dropped temperatures or incomplete instructions for doneness. In fact, Nathan even tells you what level to place the oven rack.
Sherry Yard's book (which, by the way, I found full of inconsistencies and errors, and has photographs of desserts that are decorated with garnishes not in the book, which really peeves me)is ABOUT making desserts, so I would expect the mousse directions to be concise and detailed. Nathan's instructions for his mousses are not lacking, as I can attest from actually cooking them.
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