Buy New
$17.47
Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.95
  • Save: $5.48 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 19 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 25? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Trade in your item
Get a $1.74
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll (New York Review Books Classics) Paperback


Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.47
$12.42 $7.95

Frequently Bought Together

The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll (New York Review Books Classics) + The Long Ships (New York Review Books Classics) + Butcher's Crossing (New York Review Books Classics)
Price for all three: $40.76

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: New York Review Books Classics
  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics; First Edition edition (February 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0940322919
  • ISBN-13: 978-0940322912
  • Product Dimensions: 2 x 3.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #72,955 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"And if you want to change your life - for the better - and have never read the Colombian novelist Alvaro Mutis, you owe it to yourself to get acquainted with The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll. A collection of seven novellas that can be read at a run or singly, it features the greatest rainbow-chaser since Quixote, but a lot sexier and ravenous for both learning and love, not to mention fantastical, doomed schemes to make a pile of loot." --Simon Schama, The Guardian

From the Inside Flap

"The tidy paperback volume, exactly seven hundred pages of smallish Trump Mediaeval, with a warm and informative introduction by Francisco Goldman, has the supple heft of a newborn classic, a latter-day "Don Quixote" whose central persona, both amusingly shadowy and adamantly consistent, moves around the globe somewhat as the Knight of the Mournful Countenance traversed the plains of Spain." --John Updike, THE NEW YORKER, January 13, 2003

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
17
4 star
0
3 star
3
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
This is, thus far, the best book/collection of novels I've ever read!
jd
As a single novel it contains some of the most wise, prophetic and beautiful passages I've ever read; at the same time the book is immensely readable.
M. Haber
I have started a blog in his honor, I read the book originally in English, and then in Spanish.
Bjorn Sveinbjornsson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
This may be the most beautifully written, wise, and fun book I have ever read. Maqroll is the perfect companion: he goes everywhere, knows many remarkable and delightful people in every spot, and speaks with wisdom, joy, and sadness all at once.
Each sentence is a gem: taken together, they create a world that transports the reader into a world of adventure, danger, love, friendship, and insight.
Imagine Cervantes mixed with Pynchon, with a little Groucho Marx thrown in: this is a work to savor and Maqroll is a wise and loving guide to a world of breath-taking beauty, where each day holds new treasures.
This is the closest thing to a perfect book I have come across. It is a true classic, as readers of Spanish literature have known for some years.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
52 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Myers VINE VOICE on October 4, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Yes, I agree with the other reviewers who have asseverated that this is a great book. But they don't seem to want to spell out why exactly it is a great novel, or, rather, series of picaresque adventures. - Perhaps they're simply tired due to the 700 page literary trek. - But, come now, a great novel because of tramp steamers and the sea? While the sea is certainly the element in which Maqroll feels most at home, there are, literally, hundreds of novels about the sea and the love of it (In particular, there's one author who's made himself into a multi-millionaire by churning out these books like a sausage-machine).

No, what makes this book great is the underlying fatalism of the work sweepingly on display in Maqroll and the several other characters, and in the finely wrought passages on what this life offers us, picaresque vagabond or not. Many comparisons have been made to Don Quixote. - But not in the right way - Maqroll is Don Quixote's Twentieth Century doppelganger, or spectral double: Spectral, as is the case with many doppelgangers in fiction, in that he is the Knight's opposite. Where Don Quixote is chaste, Maqroll is licentious, where Don Quixote is naïve, Maqroll is instinctively wise to the ways of the fallen world etc. etc. --- In literary terms, Don Quixote is a Romantic. Maqroll is Tragic.

I wonder, reading the other reviews, if the other readers may have just possibly skimmed over the philosophical passages that glower at one on every other page or so. It is these passages, these lyrical, defiant, essentially dark reflections that make this much more than any mere sea novel or rollicking picaresque.

For Example, for starters:

"...
Read more ›
12 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By R. B. Bernstein on September 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book by the great Colombian novelist and poet Alvaro Mutis, and translated by the wonderful Edith Grossman (author of WHY TRANSLATION MATTERS and one of the best translators of Spanish-language literature of our time) is actually a collection of seven novels (the last being in turn a collection of three stories) about the msyterious sailor known as Maqroll el Gaviero (the Lookout). Maqroll has no well-defined point of origin or national identity; he usually travels with either expired papers or with forged papers; he skates close to the law's edge and sometimes goes over the edge; and none of his ventures, whether romantic or business, ever seems to prosper. He views his life and the human beings around him with fatalistic serenity bordering on pessimism, finding solace in reading one or another obscure historical or biograp[hical work about some doomed souls in the European past. He has friends who care about him, some who join his dubious enterprises and some (like the author) who simply bear witness. Some of the novels are in Maqroll's first-person voice; others are narrated by Mutis as Maqroll's friend.

These are slow-paced, ruminative novels -- anyone looking for a thriller should find something else to read. Nonetheless, they are gripping and entertaining, and after you have finished reading them, they stay with you forever. Readers would be best advised to read one novel at a time, and let time pass from novel to novel. Mutis's works remind me of the more serious writings (not the "entertainments") of Graham Greene and the works of Joseph Conrad.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 7, 2002
Format: Paperback
READ THIS BOOK! If Dylan and Pablo Neruda collaborated, this would be the result. Lyrical, funny, heartbreaking stories set around the fringes of cities and backwater towns. Do these places even exist anymore? There is a homeric quality to the stories that transforms the flotsome and jetsome lives of the charaters. I cannot say it enought, READ THIS BOOK
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Josh Turnpike on February 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
Friends of mine in Mexico City who know Marquez say that Marques worships Mutis. They're both Colombians living in Mexico City, but they're the comparison ends. Mutis to me is Joseph Conrad, Graham Greene and Jean-Louis Ferdinand Celine rolled into one. With a little Sartre for seasoning.
I really wish more of his work would be translated, but I enjoy Mutis so much I'm tempted to just bite the bullet and read his work in Spanish even though it would take me 20 times as long.
Maqroll and Bashur are two of the greatest literary characters to come by in a very long time.
Viva el Gaviero!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa4a36048)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?