Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Adventures of Sally Paperback – November 1, 1997

4.2 out of 5 stars 37 customer reviews

See all 62 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, November 1, 1997
$9.97 $0.01
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.74

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This trio (1922, 1956, and 1970, respectively) present a liberal dose of the signature Wodehouse wit and charm. Fans will enjoy his familiar spoofs of uppercrust British stuffiness and mismatched marriages, all with a happy ending.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Mr. Wodehouse's idyllic world can never stale. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in. -- Evelyn Waugh

Wodehouse is the greatest comic writer ever. -- Douglas Adams
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (November 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140085041
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140085044
  • Product Dimensions: 4.5 x 0.8 x 7.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,527,246 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By David W. Nicholas on October 26, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition
I've never read P.G. Wodehouse. I've had friends tell me he's interesting, and fun. He is of course British, and so I expected the story to be British...imagine my surprise to find that this first book of his I've read has as its title character an American! Imagine my further (and greater) surprise to find that I share a last name with that main character. Frankly those two things started the book off right for me.

Sally Nicholas lives in Boston, lives in a boarding house, and has a pompous ass of a brother. She also has a boyfriend whom she plans to marry; he's an aspiring playwright. She comes into some money as part of an inheritance, and travels to Europe, where she meets a pair of cousins. One's the ne'er-do-well who gets fired from every job the family arranges for him; the other's a business tycoon who moves money around and disapproves of the black sheep type. She returns, and her brother's got a new career producing her boyfriend's play, now that the first producer's girlfriend has thrown a fit and quit because she feared her status as the star of the production might be impinged on.

The whole thing proceeds from there. The story is full of twists and turns, events unexpected and mostly harmless, if annoying and amusing. The author has a way with characters, and the plot is vaguely reminiscent of Jane Austen, if more modern and less densely written. I really enjoyed this book, and I imagine I'll enjoy future things of Wodehouse's that I read.
3 Comments 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wodehouse has written a very interesting book with the Adventures of Sally. In this case, the interest is created by Sally herself, as her story unfolds, even though she is surrounded by most every mundane stock character available during that time period. Yet still, Sally shines as an entirely human beacon of life, light and hope, in a world that seems doomed to be run with comedic austerity. Quite a unique perspective.

You can almost feel the Great Depression looming ominously beyond the horizon, as the Sally's tale begins with dreamy plans for financial gains and burdens of familial financial loss. Almost immediately, Sally is whisked away to a less widely known vacation spot in Roville, France, where she meets love interests Mr. Two and Mr. Three (already engaged to Mr. One). Sally's sparked interest in Mr. Two, lets call him Ginger, begins the basic premise for the plot. The rest of the book involves rejection from Mr. One in favor of Miss Two, and offering scorn to Mr. Three in reponse to his offers of love, predictably because he was immediately and always disliked. This is all sandwiched between the financial adventures of Sally's brother Fillmore as he competes for financial independance by taking up multiple ludicrous failing schemes.

Now, while unpredictable, the plot offers little in intrigue directly itself, but it does offer us something that few plots do: a feeling of reality. The repeated financial failures of friends and family members do happen, and seeing it portrayed here does a lot for the emotional involvment in the story. A nagging depression is the offshoot of this approach; always knowing that things are not going well, cannot go well, and will not go well does that to you.
Read more ›
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not to Wagnerian sturm und Drang Empires must fall broken heartedness - but genuine heartfelt pain and confusion and with the understanding that a good chum does not ask the lady about her heartbreak.

The Adventures of Sally is early Wodehouse. Psmith, the Empress of Blandings and that media powerhouse pair of Jeeves and Wooster are in the future. Instead we have a sequence of non-typical Wodehouse conventions. The main character is an American girl Sally Nicholas. A Midwestern girl come to Boston and recently into her inheritance. She's an independent young woman, used to having her way and directing others in theirs. In fact the independent spirit of her intended will provide one of several plot twists. She is free of the uncles and aunts that will provide so much humor in later Wodehouse and instead is for the moment saddled with her pompous overreaching brother.

The first thing Sally will do with her money is to take herself off to Europe and in particular the beaches of southern France. It is here that her real adventures will begin. Those adventures will mostly be about the men who will fall in love with her.
Like later Wodehouse men will fall in love pretty much on sight and for the most trivial of reasons. Sally being a levelheaded girl will expect more of love than just a few fleeting feelings of chemistry. It is this conflict that will provide the major plot driver.

All of this is not to suggest that you will miss the froth and humor that will lead many critical; make that authoritarian literary voices to conclude that PG Wodehouse wrote some of the funniest English language material of the 20th century. Sally's adventures tend to vary from quite humorous to sound if not funny storytelling. There is an emotional range in the Adventures of Sally.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've read a lot of Wodehouse... dozens of his books. I enjoy his humorous works as well as his comedy/dramas. This book falls into the latter category. There is plenty of humor in the dialogue and a few laughs in the prose, but this isn't a laugh-out-loud riot like the Jeeves and Wooster stories. It's more of a light drama with more character development. I won't give away any spoilers, but the story gets you rooting for a particular outcome that you're not sure will occur... but when it does, it's a joy and a relief. The emotions Wodehouse depicts in the characters are palpable and easy to identify with. I recommend giving this book a read... heck, it's free.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: classic literature, classics literature