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Adventures in the Spirit: God, World, Divine Action Paperback – October 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Fortress Press (October 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0800663187
  • ISBN-13: 978-0800663186
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,346,428 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Philip Clayton is Ingraham Professor of Theology at Claremont School of Theology and Professor of Religion and Philosophy at Claremont Graduate University.

More About the Author

Philip Clayton is the Dean of Claremont School of Theology and Provost of Claremont Lincoln University. He also holds the Ingraham Chair at CST. Clayton earned a joint PhD in Religious Studies and Philosophy from Yale University and has held visiting appointments at Harvard University, the University of Cambridge, and the University of Munich. He has published over 20 books and hundreds of academic and popular articles.

Over the course of 25 years of teaching and researching, Clayton's interests migrated gradually from philosophy through the science-religion debate to constructive theology. Explanation from Physics to Theology: An Essay in Rationality and Religion (Yale 1989) and several dozen articles explored similarities and differences in how knowledge and explanations function across the disciplines. The Problem of God in Modern Thought (Eerdmans 2000) and a series of accompanying articles explored the fall and rise of theistic metaphysics in the modern era. Clayton then moved into a variety of leadership positions in the international debate on the science-religion relationship, including Principal Investigator of the Science and the Spiritual Quest program. He has been an outspoken advocate for multi-cultural and multi-religious approaches to the field. Clayton has written or edited over a dozen books in this field and spoken on the topic in almost every continent. Recent works include Adventures in the Spirit (Fortress 2009), In Quest of Freedom (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht 2009), The Predicament of Belief (Oxford 2012, with Steven Knapp), and Religion and Science: The Basics (Routledge 2012).

A series of events precipitated the most recent turn: leading the Ford Foundation grant "Rekindling Theological Imagination" with Marjorie Suchocki; lecturing around the country on emergent Christianity; organizing the "Theology After Google" event; and launching the "Big Tent Christianity" movement with Brian McLaren, Tony Jones, Tripp Fuller, and others. Transforming Christian Theology: For Church and Society (Fortress 2009) argued that seminaries should help prepare Christian leaders for an unheralded transformation in the church, which has already begun in our culture. Soon thereafter the invitation came to help lead Claremont School of Theology as it becomes the Christian member of an interreligious consortium of schools known as Claremont Lincoln University. The offer was too tempting to refuse.

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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Roberts on January 7, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After reading Philip Clayton's most recent book, "Transforming Christian Theology", I turned to this one, his previous book that he says represents perhaps the last of his books aimed at the academy. Right up front, I want to make clear that my area of intellectual competence is not in the natural sciences (which this book discusses extensively). As a religious studies major in college, I of course took basic general education courses in biology and physics, but this book went far beyond what I learned from those introductory courses. I am grateful for my inquisitive mind though, because if it weren't for my extracurricular readings in the religion/science debate, as well as in philosophy and theology, I would have given up on this extremely dense book within the first few chapters. Clayton is clearly blessed with a sharp mind, which is an observation that kept me reading. Anybody who reads the book need not have an advanced understanding of religion, theology, science, and philosophy, but an understanding/expertise in one or more is definitely needed to grasp what is going here.

Even when I felt overwhelmed by the heavy ideas of this book, I was propelled forward by the challenge, by the questions, and by the momentum Clayton infuses this book with. I frequently thought to myself, "This is a book filled with challenging and fresh ideas. Just keep reading." By the last half of the book, I realized my intuition was correct and the pieces started coming together. This book is absolutely stellar for those willing to take the plunge, posing profound challenges to the reductionistic neo-Darwinism of Dawkins, but also to rigid Christian traditionalism entrenched in outworn theologies. By the end of the book, emergent complexity makes a lot of sense about the world as we know it today.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jimmy Kyriacou on August 23, 2012
Format: Paperback
If Christianity is to have a future in the 21st Century it will have to look something like the vision Clayton sets forth in this book, Adventures in the Spirit. Clayton's position is friendly to both science and religion in a way which is elegant and graceful but rigorous and systematic at the same time. Highly recommended!
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2 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Book Guy on October 13, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Reading this book, I kept thinking of the conclusion of C.S. Lewis in his great essay "Fernseeds and Elephants" - try being critical of your criticism for a change. Clayton is the type of Christian theologian happy to question the physical resurrection of Jesus. But he seems to have little or no interest in criticizing the pet theories of university academics. The idea that truth should be based on "intersubjective discourse" (i.e., what university professors think) is not only foolish, it is dangerous.
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