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Adversaries and Authorities: Investigations into Ancient Greek and Chinese Science (Ideas in Context) Paperback – July 26, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0521556958 ISBN-10: 0521556953

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Adversaries and Authorities: Investigations into Ancient Greek and Chinese Science (Ideas in Context) + The Analects of Confucius: A Philosophical Translation (Classics of Ancient China) + Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation (English and Mandarin Chinese Edition)
Price for all three: $66.03

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Product Details

  • Series: Ideas in Context (Book 42)
  • Paperback: 276 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 26, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521556953
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521556958
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,172,528 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...another valuable book from Lloyd..." Roger French, Isis

"This book will be of great value to cultural and religious historians as well as to scholars of Greek and Chinese cosmology." Linda L. Lam-Easton, Religious Studies Review

Book Description

Did science and philosophy develop differently in ancient Greece and ancient China? A series of detailed studies relate the science produced in each ancient civilization first to the values of the society in question and then to the institutions within which the scientists and philosophers worked.

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Cornerstone on January 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
Lloyd has written a number of books on this topic. He is the only one I know with an in-depth knowledge of both ancient China and ancient Greece. Both civilizations faced similar problems but dealt with them in different ways, and Lloyd deals with this in neither a China-centric or Euro-centric way.

If there is any bias, it is minimizing or ignoring the few areas that Greece was better. In history, for example, his conclusion seems to be that both had biases, but in different ways. Greek historians, though, had much more open discussions--they could openly criticize their states, promote other nations (such as Egypt or Persia) as equal or superior to Greece in certain ways, and take on popular writers, leaders or philosophers. Chinese historians occasionally offered muted criticism of emperors, but didn't waver in their Sinocentrism. Not that Greek historians had no biases or their weren't great Chinese historians (Sima Guang being the first), but history advanced as a social science first in Greece.

That being said, overall it is a very good book, but it assumes a little previous knowledge of both civilizations.

The previous reviewer should have at least mentioned the book he is supposed to be writing a review of--instead he focuses on a review of the book that is no longer posted.
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8 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Genghis Khan on December 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
The previous reviewer totally missed the mark with his comments. His review represents the worst of both worlds---frivolous logic and ignorance of history. First of all, his statement that the "Chinese didn't develop philosophy and episteme" almost made me fall of my chair from laughter. I should suggest that he read a good book on Chinese history, such as Jacques Gernet's "A History of Chinese Civilization". Or else he won't contribute anything meaningful to this review section. Furthermore, this reviewer went on to postulate that a comparison of any sort has to be made with hellenic culture as the basis. Aside from being grotesquely wrong, the statement is a real head-scratcher. A comparison, by its very definition, is mutual. This means that it should involve all parties concerned equally. If one gives more emphasis to hellenic culture, then its value is nothing more than an ego-booster, as is the common problem plaguing, more often than not, western works on history. The reviewer only knew of Alexander's expedition, but seemed to have no idea of the Han and Tang expansions, extensive contacts and influences with Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Middle East, and even the Roman Empire. If you really want to compare, Alexander was much farther from coming into contact with Chinese civilization than the Chinese was with Hellenic culture.
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