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Affirmative Action, Hate Speech, and Tenure: Narratives About Race and Law in the Academy Paperback – December 16, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0415929653 ISBN-10: 0415929652 Edition: 0th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (December 16, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415929652
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415929653
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,194,689 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Benjamin Baez's Affirmative Action, Hate Speech, and Tenure is an ambitious book that examines three nominally distinct issue areas surrounding race and the academy. It explores their underlying commonalities, both with respect to their treatment by courts as well as in their linkages to the practices and norms of the higher education establishment...At its best, Baez's study is effective in documenting the stories courts (at all levels) tell and the broader implications such stories have. He is generally thoughtful in moving outward beyond the cases per se...Throughout the study, Baez utilizes a synthetic approach to develop his arguments, relying extensively on the work of multiple writers in multiple disciplines. -- Elliot E. Slotnick, The Graduate School, The Ohio State University
Ben Baez's powerful analyses of legal narratives slice through established conceptual dichotomies and map out new spaces in which to think and act. -- Sheila Slaughter, University of Arizona, author of Academic Capitalism: Politics, Policies, and the Entrepreneurial University
This work is a tour de force, ranging widely over the academic terrain. Although he is more concerned with narratives and theory-building, Baez also employs data and insights from a number of sources. It is fresh, consistently interesting, and surprisingly original thinking. I have taught several of these court cases for many years, and he offers completely new takes on them. It has critical bite, and he clearly is in love with this field. There are not many people who read as widely as he does, and who make sense of the stew. I look forward to his next work with great anticipation. -- Michael A. Olivas, author of The Law and Higher Education
Ben Baez combines legal insight and theoretical sophistication in a thoughtful analysis of some of the most vexing issues that confront higher education today. He is not content with standard interpretations of how the academy functions and instead unearths the often seamy underside of academic life by way of a discursive analysis informed by critical race theory. Compelling. Provocative. Well-argued. Baez is fast becoming one of higher education's most insightful critics. -- William G. Tierney, University of Southern California, author of The Response University: Restructuring for High Performance
In his usual style, Professor Baez provides an articulate and insightful look into critical issues in American higher education. His analysis of judicial cases related to affirmative action, hate speech, and tenure delves into the ways in which the speech used by the courts define and create concepts of race and race injuries. A must read for those who want a broadened understanding of legal narratives and their relationship to postsecondary policy formation. In Baez's words, court cases are cultural texts...they tell significant stories about the social world. In this manuscript, Professor Baez takes the reader through those significant stories. -- Caroline S. Turner, Professor, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Arizona State University and author of Faculty of Color in Academe: Bittersweet Success
Benjamin Baez's Affirmative Action, Hate Speech, and Tenure is an ambitious book that examines three nominally distinct issue areas surrounding race and the academy. It explores their underlying commonalities, both with respect to their treatment by courts as well as in their linkages to the practices and norms of the higher education establishment...At its best, Baez's study is effective in documenting the stories courts (at all levels) tell and the broader implications such stories have. He is generally thoughtful in moving outward beyond the cases per se...Throughout the study, Baez utilizes a synthetic approach to develop his arguments, relying extensively on the work of multiple writers in multiple disciplines. -- Elliot E. Slotnick, The Graduate School, The Ohio State University

About the Author

Benjamin Baez is Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at Georgia State University. He received his Ph.D. and law degree from Syracuse University. He has published articles and monographs on academic freedom, affirmative action, race service, racism, religion, sexual harassment, and tenure.

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Format: Paperback
Benjamin Baez provides an interesting analysis of affirmative action, hate speech, and tenure discrimination by reviewing legal cases as narratives, and then using those narratives to measure the effectiveness of our court system, how the outcomes of that system dictates the view the academy has regarding race, and thereby ultimately how society views race. The results of his analysis however, are less than provocative and far from a revelation. He argues the well-known fact that our current judicial system is not only less than adequate, but at times works counter to progress.
Many agree with Baez concerning the current state of affirmative action. In a cursory look into the history of affirmative action, one will find that the current use and interpretation is far from its original intent (Sannagh 413). "First, the very nature of what may be conceived as the ultimate goal of affirmative action--namely, the deracialization of American society, insofar as racial identification remains inextricably bound up with a constellation of inegalitarian assumptions--would make it counterproductive to fully disclose that policy's most distinctive and most contentious features--its nonmeritocratic component and the extent to which some of these programs take race into account. Second, in several Supreme Court decisions--the importance of which is widely acknowledged quite independently of the interpretative framework that I suggest--judges have made a significant, yet underappreciated, contribution to that rational process of minimizing the visibility and distinctiveness of race-based affirmative action" (Sannagh 411). Most would agree with Baez that our system is less than adequate.
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