African Laughter and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $4.25 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
African Laughter: Four Vi... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: 100% Money Back Guarantee. Please remember: This item is in used condition. Good: Copy has been read, but remains in good condition. The spine remains undamaged. Eligible for Free Super Saver Shipping. Amazon Customer Service 24/7. Track your delivery to your door. ***For more great books from The Book Gypsies click thebookgypsies (see above) and then click thebookgypsies Storefront.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

African Laughter: Four Visits to Zimbabwe Paperback – August 4, 1993


See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.75
$0.01 $0.01

Reagan by H.W. Brands
Reagan by H.W. Brands
Check out the newest book by H.W. Brands. Learn more | See related books
$10.75 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

African Laughter: Four Visits to Zimbabwe + The Golden Notebook: A Novel
Price for both: $26.64

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Powerfully written and passionately felt, this memoir details four trips that novelist Lessing made to her homeland of Zimbabwe in the years since its founding in the place of the former Rhodesia.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Because Lessing grew up in Zimbabwe, she has drawn upon her African experiences in many of her writings, including Going Home (1957. o.p.), the story of her return to a land still ruled by a white minority. This time, she returns to an independent Zimbabwe in 1982 to be greeted by The Monologue: white complaints about black ineptitude. Subsequent trips in 1988 and 1989 focus on black frustration with the slowness of change ("Why can't Mugabe chief of state do anything about . . . ?") as well as with corruption. A 1992 update ends the book on a somber note: economic decline, drought, and AIDS. This is quite a fascinating look at life in Zimbabwe from someone who has an intimate knowledge of the country. Af rican Laughter is highly recommended. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 6/15/92.
- Paul H. Thomas, Hoover Inst. Lib., Stanford, Cal.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 73%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (August 4, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060924330
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060924331
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #150,083 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By C. L Wilson on November 18, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Woof! What a read! 442 pages in 6 days. Ask me anything about Zimbabwe. The home of Lessing's childhood from 5 til 30, when she moved to England. Easy reading, at times not too organized, nor, I think, rewritten too much. Could have been better. But what she is so good at is the small detail - about the dogs, or food, or dress. The small things that make up life. I think she tries hard not to be judgmental, to give both sides of the picture after 1980, when Zimbabwe became an independent nation. But it would seem like many countries in Africa today, riddled with corruption and stupidity and lack of foresight. Or the world in general, for that matter. Nowadays, why single out Africa? Sounds like it once was (is?) a beautiful country with a mild climate because it is so high. Very interesting book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Helena on January 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
I have never been in Africa and have never read any of the books about the continent except for Nadine Gordiner's fiction. While I loved the begginning of the book, the later parts become a bit sloppy and at time impatient in terms of writing style. The observations, however, about the country of Zimbabwe over the decades, and in the time after declaration of independence are amazing. One is able to follow up on lives of writer's old friends, new people she meets on her trips, amazing animals, plants and food. I have learned a lot about country , it's people and customs, racism, reverse racism, sexism, deseases and corruption a new country is struggling with. Highly recommended read for anyone interested in learning more about this amazing country and African continent.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By N. Swartzendruber on June 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
This was the only non-travel guide about Africa in my local library branch when I got back from 8 months in East Africa, so I picked it up. Certainly a very interesting picture of the slow death of British colonialism, despite Zimbabwean independence in 1980. And the successive trips provide a living view of changing attitudes and opinions, both of European expatriates and Nationals. Her inner dialogue of changes, good and bad (both very grey categories), is very informative as well.
That said, there is only a loose thread of continuing story that flows through the entire text. Granted, she's documenting her travels, but it seems a bit more perspective (or a more involved editor) could have helped give the book a bit more flow. I'd recommend it quickly to those interested in an authentic look at Africa, but probably not for those looking for a casual read during lunch breaks.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
African Laughter: Four Visits to Zimbabwe
This item: African Laughter: Four Visits to Zimbabwe
Price: $10.75
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?