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After the Fall: A Play in Two Acts (Penguin Plays) Paperback – December 18, 1980

ISBN-13: 978-0140481624 ISBN-10: 0140481621 Edition: Revised

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After the Fall: A Play in Two Acts (Penguin Plays) + All My Sons (Penguin Classics)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (December 18, 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140481621
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140481624
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 5 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #209,525 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Arthur Miller was born in New York City in 1915 and studied at the University of Michigan. His plays include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge and A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1963), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972) and The American Clock. He has also written two novels, Focus (1945), and The Misfits, which was filmed in 1960, and the text for In Russia (1969), Chinese Encounters (1979), and In the Country (1977), three books of photographs by his wife, Inge Morath. More recent works include a memoir, Timebends (1987), and the plays The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1993), which won the Olivier Award for Best Play of the London Season, and Mr. Peter's Connections (1998). His latest book is On Politics and the Art of Acting. Miller was granted with the 2001 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He has twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, and in 1949 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

More About the Author

Arthur Miller (1915-2005) was born in New York City in 1915 and studied at the University of Michigan. He was awarded the Avery Hopwood Award for Playwrighting at University of Michigan in 1936. He twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, received two Emmy awards and three Tony Awards for his plays, as well as a Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement. He also won an Obie award, a BBC Best Play Award, the George Foster Peabody Award, a Gold Medal for Drama from the National Institute of Arts and Letters, the Literary Lion Award from the New York Public Library, the John F. Kennedy Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Algur Meadows Award. He received honorary degrees from Oxford University and Harvard University and was awarded the Prix Moliere of the French theatre, the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Lifetime Achievement Award and the Pulitzer Prize, as well as numerous other awards. He was named the Jefferson Lecturer for the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2001. He was awarded the 2002 Prince of Asturias Award for Letters and the 2003 Jerusalem Prize.

Customer Reviews

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Making another to feel guilty kills love between people.
Gayle Alstrom
As a Marilyn fan i find this to be an interesting read and a glimpse into Arthur Miller's side of it all.
"zmart4ever"
Rather than entertaining, it comes off as rather unsettling.
JMack

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Keith Carlsen on July 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
Arthur Miller, having divorced actress Marilyn Monroe and married photographer Inge Morath, and in the aftermath of Monroe's still-controversial death, wrote this as part catharsis and part explanation of the recent events in his past. Treating Monroe as it does, it inspired a groundswell of revulsion for Miller that after forty years has not fully abated.

Nonetheless, this is a fascinating work that on its own merits has some appeal.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Stephanie I. Horvath on November 27, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Enthralled by Anthony LaPaglia drawl and Amy Brennemann's squeaky blonde (I know, it sounds strange but it's really all there), I loved these CDs. The brilliant text of Arthur Miller is brought to life. Rarely put on, this story of man, searching for himself and for a woman he will not repeat the same mistakes with, is fascinating and sad. It's also disturbing and moving that an author should commit to paper, and thusly to posterity and for everyone to read, his own questions and failings. Because the line is terribly thin. Miller shows at the seams of every scene. It's him fighting with Marylin, it's him redeaming God know what past... It's good. Try it.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "zmart4ever" on May 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
I seem to remember Arthur Miller dismissing the notion that this Book is biographical, but it certainly reads that way....
One can not help but draw comparison to marilyn monroe from
the maggie character...in a most unfavorable way.
The main character's relationship with the various characters in this book reveal Arthur Millers feelings about his own Life...it's almost like a comment on his marriage to the movie legend and an explanation what happened to her.
As a Marilyn fan i find this to be an interesting read and a glimpse into Arthur Miller's side of it all.
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15 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
Everyone's read Death of a Salesman and The Crucible, myself included... but in my opinion, this play is Miller's most exceptional work! It is presented in a much less formulaic, more postmodern arrangement than his other works. He tackles goodness and sin in a manner uniquely his own, examining what modern man must seek out in life. He offers a hope for humankind which can only be achieved by the acknowledgement that we all exist "after the fall" from innocence and the necessity of each of us to relearn to live and to love in our way.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Ettner on July 17, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Arthur Miller's "After the Fall" takes the form of an investigation into the forces which give rise to incomplete and destructive human relationships. Its protagonist, Quentin, in whose mind the play is enacted, subscribes to a simple credo: "You tell the truth, even against yourself." The play is fabricated as a trial or, more fittingly, an inquest in which the moralist, Quentin, sits in judgment upon his own conscience, his own values, his own actions.

Quentin, now retired from the practice of law, examines and cross-examines all aspects of his being: his distorted emotions, marital complexities, and other intimate struggles. The result is that "After the Fall" becomes a big, demanding drama. When staged, the play typically occupies a full three and a half hours, time spent in a relentless search for answers. Has Quentin's life been lived in good faith? Can, in his remaining years, he reach beyond self-condemnation to some measure of hope? A tortured process of self-discovery finds him fighting against innate fear, his unwillingness to unearth what Miller labels "the seeds of his own destruction." It is a fundamental, personal need to know that serves as the backbone of this otherwise a loosely structured play. Whether you are reading the dialog and stage direction on the page, or are sitting in a theater audience, you will likely be engrossed in his journey, since this is your journey too.

For the personal is the universal. At the same time as we are learning of intimate events in Quentin's life, a universal drama unfolds. Miller's intent is for "After the Fall" to present a broad study of mankind's terrible predisposition to cruelty, our evasions of responsibility, and our final seizure by remorse.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Samantha Glasser VINE VOICE on October 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
Arthur Miller's After the Fall is a highly autobiographical account told by a man named Quentin who has suffered through a difficult family life, two marriages, and the McCarthy Trials. It is depicted artistically by freely flowing from scene to scene with no regard to time or location, but the artistry in the continuity does not make up for the dullness of the overall story. The play reads as if this man is in a therapy session describing the painfully dull events of his life. He explains his shaky family relationships along with minor events from his childhood, his nagging first wife Louise and the attractive neighbor who made him start to think disloyally, and the struggles of co-workers faced with deciding between integrity and their careers. Although these events might seem like they could be earth-shattering, especially the McCarthy bit, Miller manages to drain them of any excitement or intrigue.

The bright spot in the play is Maggie, a highly self destructive but free spirited girl who becomes Quentin's second wife. Though when I first read the play, I had no idea of the connection, Maggie is Miller's interpretation of Marilyn Monroe. This is the sole reason that anyone who is not a fan of Miller's work would want to read this play; one gains insight into how immature and below him Miller considered Monroe to be.

If you are interested in Arthur Miller outside of his relationship with Marilyn Monroe, you might enjoy this book. If you are interested in the human mind and the way experiences shape a person, you have a slight chance of enjoying this book. If you are looking for a story with a rising action, a climax, and a fall, you probably will hate this play.
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