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After the Fall: A Play in Two Acts (Penguin Plays) Paperback – December 18, 1980

ISBN-13: 978-0140481624 ISBN-10: 0140481621 Edition: Revised

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After the Fall: A Play in Two Acts (Penguin Plays) + All My Sons (Penguin Classics) + Death of a Salesman (Penguin Plays)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (December 18, 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140481621
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140481624
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.4 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #531,616 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Arthur Miller was born in New York City in 1915 and studied at the University of Michigan. His plays include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge and A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1963), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972) and The American Clock. He has also written two novels, Focus (1945), and The Misfits, which was filmed in 1960, and the text for In Russia (1969), Chinese Encounters (1979), and In the Country (1977), three books of photographs by his wife, Inge Morath. More recent works include a memoir, Timebends (1987), and the plays The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1993), which won the Olivier Award for Best Play of the London Season, and Mr. Peter's Connections (1998). His latest book is On Politics and the Art of Acting. Miller was granted with the 2001 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He has twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, and in 1949 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

More About the Author

Arthur Miller (1915-2005) was born in New York City in 1915 and studied at the University of Michigan. He was awarded the Avery Hopwood Award for Playwrighting at University of Michigan in 1936. He twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, received two Emmy awards and three Tony Awards for his plays, as well as a Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement. He also won an Obie award, a BBC Best Play Award, the George Foster Peabody Award, a Gold Medal for Drama from the National Institute of Arts and Letters, the Literary Lion Award from the New York Public Library, the John F. Kennedy Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Algur Meadows Award. He received honorary degrees from Oxford University and Harvard University and was awarded the Prix Moliere of the French theatre, the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Lifetime Achievement Award and the Pulitzer Prize, as well as numerous other awards. He was named the Jefferson Lecturer for the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2001. He was awarded the 2002 Prince of Asturias Award for Letters and the 2003 Jerusalem Prize.

Customer Reviews

Making another to feel guilty kills love between people.
Gayle Alstrom
As a Marilyn fan i find this to be an interesting read and a glimpse into Arthur Miller's side of it all.
"zmart4ever"
Rather than entertaining, it comes off as rather unsettling.
JMack

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Keith Carlsen on July 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
Arthur Miller, having divorced actress Marilyn Monroe and married photographer Inge Morath, and in the aftermath of Monroe's still-controversial death, wrote this as part catharsis and part explanation of the recent events in his past. Treating Monroe as it does, it inspired a groundswell of revulsion for Miller that after forty years has not fully abated.

Nonetheless, this is a fascinating work that on its own merits has some appeal.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "zmart4ever" on May 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
I seem to remember Arthur Miller dismissing the notion that this Book is biographical, but it certainly reads that way....
One can not help but draw comparison to marilyn monroe from
the maggie character...in a most unfavorable way.
The main character's relationship with the various characters in this book reveal Arthur Millers feelings about his own Life...it's almost like a comment on his marriage to the movie legend and an explanation what happened to her.
As a Marilyn fan i find this to be an interesting read and a glimpse into Arthur Miller's side of it all.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Samantha Glasser VINE VOICE on October 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
Arthur Miller's After the Fall is a highly autobiographical account told by a man named Quentin who has suffered through a difficult family life, two marriages, and the McCarthy Trials. It is depicted artistically by freely flowing from scene to scene with no regard to time or location, but the artistry in the continuity does not make up for the dullness of the overall story. The play reads as if this man is in a therapy session describing the painfully dull events of his life. He explains his shaky family relationships along with minor events from his childhood, his nagging first wife Louise and the attractive neighbor who made him start to think disloyally, and the struggles of co-workers faced with deciding between integrity and their careers. Although these events might seem like they could be earth-shattering, especially the McCarthy bit, Miller manages to drain them of any excitement or intrigue.

The bright spot in the play is Maggie, a highly self destructive but free spirited girl who becomes Quentin's second wife. Though when I first read the play, I had no idea of the connection, Maggie is Miller's interpretation of Marilyn Monroe. This is the sole reason that anyone who is not a fan of Miller's work would want to read this play; one gains insight into how immature and below him Miller considered Monroe to be.

If you are interested in Arthur Miller outside of his relationship with Marilyn Monroe, you might enjoy this book. If you are interested in the human mind and the way experiences shape a person, you have a slight chance of enjoying this book. If you are looking for a story with a rising action, a climax, and a fall, you probably will hate this play.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 19, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This play is way too sophisticated for my tastes. I am only half-way through it and I am only going to reach the end because I am the kind of obsessive-compulsive individual who must finish a book or a movie or an audio book once I start them. I do violate this rule once in a while, but this play is too short to resist...

Anyway, I think LA Theater Works is a FANTASTIC publisher and I love most of the many plays of theirs I have listened to, but this one is above my head. I find the actors truly outstanding, but the story and the dialog are broken and confusing. Once in a while a short sequence will hit me as meaningful and compelling, but usually this is in the midst of other rather obscure dialog or monologues.

I have loved all other plays by Arthur Miller I have listened to so far, so I guess I just do not like this form or disconnected high-brow semi-autobiographical story telling. I really do not want to be dismissive. I can believe that there is much more to this play than what *I* can understand, but I just don't get it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stephanie I. Horvath on November 27, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Enthralled by Anthony LaPaglia drawl and Amy Brennemann's squeaky blonde (I know, it sounds strange but it's really all there), I loved these CDs. The brilliant text of Arthur Miller is brought to life. Rarely put on, this story of man, searching for himself and for a woman he will not repeat the same mistakes with, is fascinating and sad. It's also disturbing and moving that an author should commit to paper, and thusly to posterity and for everyone to read, his own questions and failings. Because the line is terribly thin. Miller shows at the seams of every scene. It's him fighting with Marylin, it's him redeaming God know what past... It's good. Try it.
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15 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
Everyone's read Death of a Salesman and The Crucible, myself included... but in my opinion, this play is Miller's most exceptional work! It is presented in a much less formulaic, more postmodern arrangement than his other works. He tackles goodness and sin in a manner uniquely his own, examining what modern man must seek out in life. He offers a hope for humankind which can only be achieved by the acknowledgement that we all exist "after the fall" from innocence and the necessity of each of us to relearn to live and to love in our way.
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Format: Paperback
Quentin, the protagonist in Arthur Miller's play After the Fall, is a successful attorney with accomplished friends and colleagues who is sufficiently attractive to women that he has fewer affairs than he could have if he were interested in attaining the status of a sophisticated urban rake. Much to his discomfort, however, Quentin's life is heavy-laden with moral quandaries that lie heavily on his conscience. Some of his internal struggle is of his own making. After all, he did have an affair, promised his wife, Louise, that he'd break it off, but reneged on their agreement.

Understandably, Louise is resentful, and restoring trust is always difficult and sometimes impossible. Because of Quentin's betrayal and her disappointment, she has concluded that he does not love her, doesn't take her seriously, and that he discounts her importance as a distinctively interesting person. One suspects that Louise imagines, probably with good reason, that Quentin had long since ceased to regard her as someone of value, easy to ignore, not quite a whole and feeling human being.

Beyond that, After the Fall is set in the 1950's. Quentin and his friends, prominent and successful as they are, have been forced into the ranks of the victims of anti-communist hysteria fostered by self-seeking,reactionary politicians. They have been called before Congressional committees to answer for what may have been membership and participation in subversive organizations. None is completely guilty, but none is, in a strict sense, completely innocent either. They have been idealists, perhaps inexcusably naive, who wittingly and unwittingly served the interests of America's enemies. Ironically, their primary protection from adverse consequences is the U.S.
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