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After Hours: Tales from Ur-Bar Mass Market Paperback – March 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: DAW; paperback / softback edition (March 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0756406595
  • ISBN-13: 978-0756406592
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 4.1 x 6.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,526,892 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Joshua Palmatier was born in PA, but now resides in NY. Palmatier started writing SF and Fantasy novels and short stories in eighth grade, and hasn't stopped writing since, mainly focusing on novels. He can be found at sff.net/people/jpalmatier/.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jean Marie Ward on April 19, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Check out any pantheon, the gods of land, sea and sky always make a place for a god of beer or wine. Writers, too, if only because the bar is where you'll find other writers, and they've got the best stories.
The fifteen tales in AFTER HOURS span all of recorded history and mythology. The spirits on tap--and holding down the bar--can be forces of nature (Benjamin Tate's "An Ale Wife in Kish")or the soul of kindness (Maria V. Snyder's "Sake and Other Spirits"). Sometimes they offer lessons that play out over the decades to follow (Laura Anne Gilman's "Paris 24" and Juliet E. McKenna's "Grand Tour"), and sometimes all they can offer is a hard choice (Barbara Ashford's "The Tale That Wagged the Dog" and Ian Tregillis's "Steady Hands and a Heart of Oak").
The characters range from rowdy Vikings (S.C. Butler's "Why the Vikings Had No Bars") to obscure Holy Roman Emperors (Jennifer Dunne's "The Emperor's New God") to ghosts, time-travelers and zombies (Jackie Kessler's "Where We Are Is Hell", Avery Shade's "Forbidden" and Anton Stroud's "Izdu Bar", respectively). There are "behind the curtain" peeks at the Affair of the Poisoners (Kari Sperring's "The Fortune-Teller Makes Her Will"), and what the Harkers, as in the family of Jonathan Harker, were really up to in Transylvania (Patricia Bray's "Last Call").
Plus, an anthology like this allows the reader to experience some of their favorite writers in times and places not their own, such as Seanan McGuire's "The Alchemy of Alcohol" and "The Tavern Fire" by D.B. Jackson (aka David Coe).
I enjoyed them all and heartily recommend them to anyone who loves fantasy and history--and isn't that everybody here?
Slainte!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Stogner VINE VOICE on March 29, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Pull up a stool, grab your favorite poison and listen...

This was an "out of the box" read for me (I won it from Avery Shade). I was attracted by the premise of the anthology. A bar run by Gilgamesh that continues to exist through out time. Each author starts with this premise and writes a tale in their own reality and time.

I loved every single one of these stories (there are 15)! All the authors were unknown to me before this book. Each one thrilled me with tales of adventure, sacrifice and humor. Each author was able to let me slip seamlessly into their reality. I felt as if I was in "that" bar listening to stories being told the way they are suppose to, under dim lighting with a drink in my hand and huddled in a corner <G>. No matter what genre you enjoy, this anthology will keep you entertained!

Just be careful if Gil offers you his special brew, and be careful what you wish for ;)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David J. Fortier on July 4, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Book Review: After Hours: Tales from the Ur-Bar

One of the warnings I've been given as a fantasy writer is to avoid cliché tavern scenes. Enter AFTER HOURS: TALES FROM THE UR-BAR, an anthology about a time-traveling tavern that carefully breaks this rule and others.

Disclaimer: Since I know the editors and some of the authors of this book, I have tried exceptionally hard to be objective in reviewing. That said, I think the concept is cool. Check it out:[...]

After Hours: Tales from the Ur-Bar

The first bar, created by the Sumerians after they were given the gift of beer by the gods, was known as the Ur-Bar. Although it has since been destroyed, its spirit lives on--in each age there is one bar that captures the essence of the original Ur-Bar, where drinks are mixed with magic and served with a side of destiny and intrigue.

And now for the individual story reviews with mild ((SPOILERS)). Favorites in bold:

"An Alewife In Kish" by Benjamin Tate - Who doesn't like origin stories? Here we learn how Gilgamesh becomes the bartender of the Ur-Bar, bonus points for using a historical figure as a main character. The advice to avoid extended flashbacks in short stories was expertly broken here, as Gilgamesh's tale within the tale provides the basis for his downfall.

"Why the Vikings Had No Bars" by S.C. Butler - It is easy to like a story with a cameo by a one-eyed Norse god and his ravens. A double rule-breaker, this tale not only occurs exclusively within a tavern, but also includes a tavern brawl. S.C. Butler makes this work in a light-hearted way with a running joke between Gilgamesh and the god.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By H. Grove (errantdreams) TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 15, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After Hours: Tales from the Ur-Bar is an anthology edited by Patricia Bray and Joshua Palmatier. It includes fifteen stories set in and around the bar, touched by its magic and its unusual proprietor. It's a fertile concept, reminiscent of the "shop of mysteries" conceit in which tales revolve around a store filled with curios and mysterious (often dangerous) items of interest.

The first couple of stories were interesting, light fare. There were some inconsistent details between tales that I found a little jarring: for instance, in one tale Gilgamesh is bored and unimpressed by gods, while in the next he seems deferential. In one story the bar is filled with living and dead legends, while in most of the others the primary clientele is made up of ordinary working people.

Several tales provide an interesting peek into an alternate version of historical events, while others delve straight into the wild and weird. Some of the story plots are well-used tropes, while others show some very nice originality.

Ultimately After Hours is a solid read, although not outstanding. Several of the stories were moving and original, and most fit the premise quite well.

[NOTE: review book provided by publisher]
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