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After Mozart


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Audio CD, September 18, 2001
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Biography

Over the course of more than 30 years of a distinguished career, violinist Gidon Kremer, born in Riga in 1947, has established a worldwide reputation as one of the most original and compelling artists of his generation, praised for his high degree of individualism, his rejection of the well-trodden paths of interpretation, and his search for new possibilities. Gidon Kremer has made more than ... Read more in Amazon's Gidon Kremer Store

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Product Details

  • Performer: Gidon Kremer, Kremerata Baltica
  • Orchestra: Leopold Mozart
  • Composer: Alexandr Raskatov, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Valentin Silvestrov, Alfred Schnittke, Leopold Mozart
  • Audio CD (September 18, 2001)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Nonesuch
  • ASIN: B00005NSQU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #367,576 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. 5 min. aus dem Leben von W.A.M., for violin, string orchestra & percussion
2. Serenade No. 6 for orchestra in D major ('Serenata Notturna'), K. 239: Marcia, Maestoso
3. Serenade No. 6 for orchestra in D major ('Serenata Notturna'), K. 239: Menuetto & Trio
4. Serenade No. 6 for orchestra in D major ('Serenata Notturna'), K. 239: Rondeau, Allegretto
5. The Messenger, for strings & piano
6. Serenade No. 13 for strings in G major ('Eine kleine Nachtmusik'), K. 525: Allegro
7. Serenade No. 13 for strings in G major ('Eine kleine Nachtmusik'), K. 525: Romance, Andante
8. Serenade No. 13 for strings in G major ('Eine kleine Nachtmusik'), K. 525: Menuetto & Trio, Allegretto
9. Serenade No. 13 for strings in G major ('Eine kleine Nachtmusik'), K. 525: Rondo, Allegro
10. Moz-Art à la Haydn, for 2 violins & 11 strings
11. Toy Symphony, (Cassation for toys, 2 oboes, 2 horns & strings) in G major (formerly K. 63): Allegro
12. Toy Symphony, (Cassation for toys, 2 oboes, 2 horns & strings) in G major (formerly K. 63): Menuetto-Trio-Menuetto
13. Toy Symphony, (Cassation for toys, 2 oboes, 2 horns & strings) in G major (formerly K. 63): Finale

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Aceto TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 5, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
First off, I am guessing you are considering this record because it is done by Gidon Kremer. If not, please understand that he is a gifted nut job. He is not the place to go for a canonical interpretation. And Mozart would applaud this judgement and Kremer's course. Mozart loved fun, not reverence and protocol. He did opera for the masses.

I called Kremer a nut job, but in a serious way. He does not fool with the music. The performances are tight, disciplined presentations. But he does have his own way. Not technically, mind you, as we see some performers do. Rather it is a context of presentation where faithful joins fun.

Back to the rest of you Kremerata fans. Getting past the opening tintinabulation and more, rather than kleine, nachtmusik, you get to some quite interesting Schnittke. Here you are in the heart of what Kremer knows how to do best. This piece is the anchor for the record.

But I confess that the Leopold Mozart's Kids Symphony is the real draw for me. I promise not to tell on you for this cheap pleasure. The trick is not to play to the toys. You gotta do it strait or it would be a pandering flop.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Ingalls on November 13, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Violinist Gidon Kremer and his talented ensemble, Kremerata Baltica, have been producing fresh interpretations of classic and contemporary classical works for some time now. This release is no exception.
The idea behind "After Mozart" is a simple one but produces wonderful results. The music features compositions by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (and his father, Leopold), as well as latter-day composers inspired by him. Raskatrov, Silvestrov and Schnittke are among the composers featured.
As usual with this ensemble, the music is bright, brilliant, and a true celebration of the compositions. I could have done without the inclusion of "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik" (a nice piece of music but soooo overexposed), but otherwize the selections are wisely chosen. Bravo to Kremer and his musicians.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dennis G. Voss Jr. on July 25, 2006
Format: Audio CD
The performances on this CD are superb. They are especially successful at bringing out the playful side of the Mozartian musical vision -- not only as shown in the obviously experimental pieces by other composers, but also in how the more-familiar pieces by Mozart are interpreted and recorded (e.g., the cadenzas in the final movement of the "Serenata Notturna"). Less impressive is the way these pieces fit together. The Kremerata Baltica do bring out the essential commonality of the music, but that commonality is sometimes overwhelmed by the prominent idiosyncracies: the Raskatov contribution with its keening violin, the somber Silvestrov piece floating in from far away on a windy day, the jarring familiarity of "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik" in the middle of works you're likely hearing for the first time, and especially the loudly recorded toy sounds interpersed throughout Leopold Mozart's symphony. Not to say that these distracting traits make for bad music -- Gidon Kremer's playing on the Andante is particularly lovely -- or that someone listening closely to the CD would find these traits objectionable. But potential buyers at least should be aware that they will not be getting the sort of Mozart disc that people put on as background music so that they can relax and drink a cup of chamomile tea. You'll need to approach it with the same playfulness that Mozart often exhibited in his compositions.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Culver TOP 1000 REVIEWER on January 29, 2011
Format: Audio CD
The inspiration that the Soviet avant-garde found in the Classical era inspired this disc where violinist Gidon Kremer and his string orchestra Kremerata Baltica juxtapose pieces by Mozart with Raskatov, Schnittke and Silvestrov. I'm not much of a fan of Mozart himself, so I'll limit my review to the 20th century composers present here. Their treatment of Mozart varies widely.

Alfred Schnittke's "Moz-Art a la Haydn" for 2 violins and strings (1977) irreverently improvises on the fragement of Mozart's unfinished "pantomime music" K. 446. If you're familiar with other Schnittke works from the height of his polystylistic period, then you know what to expect here: shifts from pure tones to crushing dissonance, much pathos and some general zaniness. In live performance there is considerable theatricality: alteration of darkness and light, the musicians walking off the stage as in Haydn's "Farewell" symphony, the violinist detuning her instrument, and the conductor left all alone, still beating time. A mere CD recording can't represent that, but there is a concert DVD again with Kremer and the Kremerata Baltica. Kremer also previously recorded "Moz-Art a la Haydn" on a DG disc with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe.

In Alexander Raskatov's "5 Min. aus dem Leben von W.A.M." the purity of the classical line is also undermined, but more subtly, employing orchestration and extended performance techniques that date to later eras.
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