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After the Welfare State: Politicians Stole Your Future, You Can Get It Back Paperback – September 3, 2012

4.1 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

This book provides a superb introduction to the folly of the welfare state. The historical examples, the discussion of adverse consequences from existing welfare programs, and the moral arguments against government-imposed redistribution are all compelling background for anyone who cares about our future prosperity. Your future depends on understanding what is in this book. Jeffrey Miron, Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Economics --Harvard University

After the Welfare State makes serious economic analysis of current events readable, enlightening, and enjoyable. Spending other people's money - even with the best of intentions - is a recipe for conflict and even catastrophe, as the authors demonstrate in one country after another. Donald J. Boudreaux, Professor of Economics, --George Mason University

To come, John Stossell's remarks, from his upcoming Fox Business broadcast, Thursday October 4. --Fox Business

After the Welfare State makes serious economic analysis of current events readable, enlightening, and enjoyable. Spending other people's money - even with the best of intentions - is a recipe for conflict and even catastrophe, as the authors demonstrate in one country after another. Donald J. Boudreaux, Professor of Economics, George Mason University --George Mason University

To come, John Stossell's remarks, from his upcoming Fox News broadcast, Thursday October 4. --Fox News

About the Author

Dr. Tom G. Palmer is executive vice president for international programs at the Atlas Network. He oversees the work of teams working around the world to advance the principles of classical liberalism and works with a global network of think tanks and research institutes. Dr. Palmer is a senior fellow of the Cato Institute, where he was formerly vice president for international programs and director of the Center for the Promotion of Human Rights. He was an H. B. Earhart Fellow at Hertford College, Oxford University, and a vice president of the Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University. He is a member of the board of advisors of Students For Liberty. He has published reviews and articles on politics and morality in scholarly journals such as the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, Ethics, Critical Review, and Constitutional Political Economy, as well as in publications such as Slate, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Die Welt, Al Hayat, Caixing, the Washington Post, and The Spectator of London. He received his B.A. in liberal arts from St. Johns College in Annapolis, Maryland; his M.A. in philosophy from The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.; and his doctorate in politics from Oxford University. His scholarship has been published in books from Princeton University Press, Cambridge University Press, Routledge, and other academic publishers and he is the author of Realizing Freedom: Libertarian Theory, History, and Practice, published in 2009 and the editor of the previous book in the Students for Liberty series, The Morality of Capitalism, published in 2011.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Jameson Books; 1st edition (September 3, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0898031710
  • ISBN-13: 978-0898031713
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,259,162 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Libertarian scholar and activist Tom G. Palmer has carried the ideas of liberty to some of the most oppressed and dangerous parts of the planet. He smuggled books, photocopiers, and faxes into the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact nations and has taught and lectured in Iraq, Afghanistan, and many other countries. He earned his B.A. in liberal arts from St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland, his M.A. in philosophy from The Catholic University of America, and his D.Phil. in politics from Oxford University. He is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, in Washington, D.C., where he was previously vice president for international programs, and is vice president for international programs, where he directs platforms and active programs of book publishing, summer schools, and policy conferences in 15 languages. He serves on the boards of a number of organizations and is active in several charitable groups.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In 2012, we, in the United States, now face economic collapse. We have reelected a president who has gone in the hole over 5 trillion dollars in 4 years time. No previous president was ever short 1 trillion in a single budget but now we have done it for four years running. To make up for these shortfalls we are selling overrated bonds like mad while the Federal Reserve actively prints money. The end is near, and the only concessions our politicians offer to make is to cut future growth of the federocracy...while pretending they are "draconian cuts." How absurd! We're in serious trouble, and Tom Palmer contemplating the end of the welfare state is most timely. It's coming. Soon, we'll have no options whatsoever unless we want to go the way of Zimbabwe. Mr. Palmer is the editor of this work. He is not the sole author. He contributes several excellent essays here, and most libertarians will have heard many of these arguments and positions previously. However, the two chapters on Greece and Italy are fresh (at least to me) and very educational. I never knew that the Italian government was ever! as friendly to free markets as they were in the 50s and early 60s. I just wish our own American politicians would emulate today some of the decisions the Europeans made a half century ago. This is a thin volume (under 150 pages of text) but it's enlightening and sure to persuade those who have yet to make up their minds regarding the connection between free markets and free peoples. I also like the fact that the foundation that published it is offering volume sales on the back page at a price at which they are sure to take a loss financially. It shows how dedicated they are to making the truth known, and the truth is precisely what is on display in After the Welfare State. It's a splendid book.
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Format: Paperback
After the Welfare State is an important contribution to the discussion on welfare economics and what kind of rights people have (should have). The selection of authors allows the reader to understand the opinions of various cultures and countries on the size of government intervention in interhuman solidarity. I especially like the fact that both, European (such as Johan Norberg) and American authors (such as Tom G. Palmer and Michael Tanner) contributed to this book. After the Welfare State is a must read in times of overburdening public debt and discussions on austerity. I would recommend it for everyone who is interested in understanding how to build a freer and more sustainable future.
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This book provides readers with a clear analysis of the problems caused by the welfare state system.
I really appreciated the diversity of the different essays.
Historical as well as contemporary examples are very precise.
Every student (and not only student...) should definitely read "After the Welfare State" in as much as this book tackles common fallacies which are never taught in school. Everyone should take the time to sit and think about the sustainability of such a system.
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Excellent little book. Since I believe that the origins of the welfare state hatched in concert with the progressive project and the first major accomplishment of progressivism was the simultaneous institution of medical licensing in Europe and the United States the parts of the book of greatest interest to me involved the dynamics of health care prior to the progressive era, and how that is a window into the future post-welfare state age. If we are going to have affordable health care in the future, there will have to be genuine competition in the health care market and the cartels that control the medical-industrial complex today will have to be done away with. The book describes what it calls "friendly societies" wherein people with common interests or occupations formed organizations for self-help and cooperative care, sort of like insurance. The Romans had something like this in the form of funerary societies within occupations to help with burial expenses so as not to overburden the families of the deceased in the event of a death. These more modern versions were built around health care. One thing of note was that these societies began contracting with doctors to cover the lives in their societies for a fixed, regular income, and the response of local medical societies was to try to limit the practice of the contracting physician, or somehow get rid of his ability to practice. The irony of the state of things today is that the one of the very reasons doctors asked for licensing was to try and prevent this from happening in the future, and now it is happening all over again, only this time it will be under government mandates. In other words the medical community is hoist on it's own petard, only most doctors, ignorant as they are of their own profession's spotty record in the past are completely unaware of the irony.
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I received this book as a gift from my son, who had not yet read it. I found it rather predictable, but an enjoying read. I then returned it so my son, whose political views are similar to mine, could read it.

The book's basic assumption is that we are at the end of the era of the "welfare state", in which politicians, both of the left and right, have used "other peoples' money to buy votes which then allowed them (the politicians) to live in luxury on the backs of the rest of us.

However, the authors of this collection of essays maintain, "the welfare state" is actually not in the best interests of the people. The essays trace the history of political welfarism and the mutual help societies of cooperating individuals the preceded the state, and according to many, did a much better job.

Many of us feel that society is on the verge of dramatic change, perhaps for the better.

In this hope I fervently wish, and I think this book is a nice nudge in that direction.
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