Buy Used
$4.00
Condition: :
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. It may be marked, have identifying markings on it, or show other signs of previous use.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Afterwards, You're a Genius Hardcover – December 28, 1998


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.59 $0.01

The 20/20 Diet: Turn Your Weight Loss Vision Into Reality
Dr. Phil and his team have created a plan that you can start following right now and continue working for the rest of your life.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 398 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Hardcover; 1 edition (December 28, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573221139
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573221139
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,714,639 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

When literary journalist Chip Brown offers up his heart to various healers for mending, the result is a probing, often hilarious journey into the depths of the alternative-medicine movement. Consider the power of mummified bananas. You may call exponents of this diet "woo-woos and wackos," as Brown once did, but as the director of the University of Nevada's Consciousness Research Lab said, "You're wacky before you succeed. Afterwards, you're a genius."

Afterwords, You're a Genius should appeal to a much broader readership than most New Age titles because Brown's first-person narrative succeeds in fusing humor, intellect, and curiosity with a dazzling writing style reminiscent of Tom Wolfe. Suddenly, reading about metaphysics is hip, not dippy.

Examining not only his own intentions but the healers', Brown's record of his growing awareness of such things as chakra influences is amusing. At the same time, the book asks truly important questions about conventional Western medicine and ponders the meaning of a widespread loss of faith in doctors. While he acknowledges that "most of the secular academic world equates faith with naïve self-delusion and holds that to entertain the fairy tales of a higher power is to affront the only real higher power, which is reason," he reports that more and more highly educated people are seeking alternative treatment. "Belief," he writes, "is still working some of the weirdest voodoo in the healing world."

Highly informative and offering prolific footnotes, Brown struggles with "chronic misgivings," the "ineffable," and logic as he witnesses things that can "no more be corralled in language than the essence of smell." He writes,

The trauma in Cynthia's back felt like when you go from a paved road to gravel. Cancer felt like dancing in a mosh pit. The voice of the liver was like a cassette playing too slowly in a Walkman with rundown batteries. The pancreas had an agile, hyper feeling. Lymph nodes felt like humid wind blowing over small grapes.
Ultimately, Brown, an award-winning journalist, offers readers a critical look at the field of medicine and metaphysics without supposing solutions. Quoting from great thinkers like Saint Augustine ("Understanding is the reward of faith") and Thomas Sydenham ("the arrival of a good clown exercises more beneficial influence upon the health of a town than twenty asses laden with drugs"), perhaps Brown is most in sync with Emerson, who wrote: "Our life is not threatened so much as our perception." Afterwards, You're a Genius dares to open the doors. --Cristina Del Sesto

From Publishers Weekly

Though the subject of alternative medicine often leads to polarized and strident debate, Brown brings bracing intellectual balance and humor to his exploration of the ways in which faith and spirit contribute to physical healing. Brown, a former reporter for the Washington Post and an award-winning journalist, draws on extensive historical research, lectures and interviews with practitioners, and his own experiences as a patient in this engaging and provocative analysis. He points out that a "longing for meaning" drives the increasing numbers of people who seek alternatives to Western medicine. Drawn to practices based on the concept of "chakras," or energy centers within the body, Brown is clearly sympathetic to alternative approaches, and he makes his exploration of the subject intensely personal. But his lively skepticism also leads him to question some tenets of spiritual healing and to acknowledge the real advances achieved by modern medical science. One of the book's best chapters brings the reader into the operating room of a cardiac surgeon as a bypass patient is helped during surgery by a healer who is present throughout the procedure. Another describes the complex feelings that evolve over Brown's long course of treatment with Rachel, an aspiring novelist as well as a healer, who reveals a disappointing egotism when she asks Brown to critique her newest manuscript. While this book offers no solid answers about how healing occurs, its value lies in the important questions it raises and in the genuine spirit of inquiry, buttressed by critical thinking, that Brown brings to his subject.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 1, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Chip Brown's journey is one that many have undertaken, but the account of his particular route paves the way for those who have wanted to "go there" but have not done so for fear of appearing foolish. This reader has spent several decades exploring body/mind questions, eastern religions, and other metaphysical mysteries. My quest has been green from the start, but my method too often yellow. (Thanks to Brown's translation, one can finally speak aloud the color language of chakras and their corresponding wave patterns which healers have long used to communicate with each other.) I have furtively visited several of the exotic lands he describes, and despite the thrills -- and chills -- of my travels, I don't show my slides at dinner parties for fear of invitations "drying up," as he so amusingly puts it. However, after twelve years of study with the "Lady Lama" in his story, I can attest to the accuracy of his account. In addition to much much more, I have learned from her that healing begins in the heart which is fueled by compassion, courage, and, yes, humor. Brown's book is replete with these qualities and it will go a long way toward helping some on the journey to come out of the closet, and others to just lighten up. Medicine is about to take a huge leap forward and Brown's narrative will serve as a compass for those who have the courage to go.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bob Kirk on September 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I approached Chip Brown's book with a healthy load of skepticism astride my shoulders (which is probably why I visit a chiropractor every week!). Having submitted my body to various alternative healing procedures over the past two years, homeopathy, polarity, muscle testing, and accupressure were not unknown techniques. Having been raised in a family where scientific proofs were valued by otherwise open-minded parents, I had been vacillating between belief and disbelief for years. The manner in which Mr. Brown presents his journey into 'the metaphysics of healing' makes for tedious reading at times but also contains passages that flow into the readers consciousness like a tide of enlightenment. Add to this Mr. Brown's hilariously dry wit (which puntuates most of the book) and you have what is basically an exploration by an everyman/writer into a mystery he only half comprehends. When I finally turned the last page I was dismayed that there wasn't more to read as so many questions had been left unanswered. In the final analysis, it has only complicated my own journey of exploration.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dan Booth Cohen on March 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I read this book several years ago. Now I realize it remains one of my all-time favorites. It is written in a quirky, humorous, personal philosophic style. It's not a cut-and-dry book about energy healing.

It is funny, beautifully written and provocative. Read it and enjoy!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By GraberDC on March 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
.....energy healing and healers. This is a fun, informative, and personal story of Mr. Brown, who went from skeptical and objective journalist, to avid client and participant in the subtle energy healing arts. Mr. Brown chronicles his experiences and relationships with several prominent and not so prominent practitioners. He also delves into the history of mental and bio-energetic practices and practitioners, and includes Mesmer, Reich, and others.
Brown works out in print the cognitive dissonace between his skeptical and rational evaluations, and his personal empirical results and experiences which contradicted them. I found his ongoing inner commentaries and point-counterpoint debates entertaining and hilarious at times.
This is a great first hand exploration of the worlds of chakra healers, astral spiders, extraterrestrial skull implants, and dozens of other unconventional, new age, and esoteric healing beliefs and practices. There is something here for both believers and skeptics of this universe next door.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Chip Brown is a journalist. He isn't taken in by mumbojumbo. He starts off quizzically, wondering if all this new age stuff is really mumbo jumbo. But he has the openess to allow himself to be moved, to become involved but never to be entirely taken in. His writing is lyrical and beautiful, his take on this late 90s subject is humourous, intelligent and so raw in its honesty I was really moved. Rarely do men allow themselves to be this exposed. A book to convince women that men who are thoughtful, truthful and brave do exist.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had owned this book for several years (Don't recall how I had come to buy it) but recently read through it for the first time. It had its ups and downs and at times got a little bogged down, but as the chapters rolled by, it turned out to have been worth the struggle. I was familiar with quite a few of his references and descriptions of some of his interviews which shed more light on such persons as Bernard Grad and Colonel Estabany whom I had known about for the past 30 years. He certainly shared a lot of personal travels into the paranormal and hands-on healing that is worthwhile. His details about the crazy AMA article, claiming to "expose" the uselessness of Therapeutic Touch is almost super-funny, despite the expose of medical rigidity that does the AMA no accolades. Therapeutic Touch is real and works as do most hands-on healing methods.
I have been a fellow-traveler for decades of the subjects touched on, as well as having practiced psychiatry for 60 years.
I did skim-read it a second time and made notes of some of his quotes and references, many quite worth pursuing, such as Moerman's book, The anthropology of medicine."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.