Against the Fall of Night (Arthur C. Clarke Collection and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Value Promenade
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good overall with moderate wear; No dust jacket;
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Against Fall Of Night Mass Market Paperback – May 5, 1955

ISBN-13: 978-0425059746 ISBN-10: 042505974X

Used
Price: $0.01
2 New from $737.60 37 Used from $0.01 4 Collectible from $9.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback, May 5, 1955
$737.60 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$5.65
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Berkley (May 5, 1955)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 042505974X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425059746
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (83 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,550,901 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Arthur C. Clarke is awesomely informed about physics and astronomy, and blessed with one of the most astounding imaginations ever encountered in print NEW YORK TIMES For many readers Arthur C. Clarke is the very personification of science fiction THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SCIENCE FICTION Arthur C. Clarke is one of the truly prophetic figures of the space age ... The colossus of science fiction NEW YORKER --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Arthur C. Clarke is the world's best known and bestselling author of science fiction, winner of many awards and accolades for his writing. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

"SIR ARTHUR C. CLARKE (1917-2008) wrote the novel and co-authored the screenplay for 2001: A Space Odyssey. He has been knighted by Queen Elizabeth II, and he is the only science-fiction writer to be nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. His fiction and nonfiction have sold more than one hundred million copies in print worldwide.

Customer Reviews

The plot keeps moving, characters are intelligent, interesting and believable.
W. Smith
Although some parts of the story seem a bit dated by the standards of 2013, it's still a very good read.
ManInBlack
As a kid, Science Fiction was my genre and Arthur C Clarke was my favorite author.
Dave Johnson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Virgil on April 24, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the precursor to the Clarke novel "City and the Stars". I originally read this while still in elementary school and it was the first sci-fi I had ever read. No other has ever topped it.
Clarke forms a world in the very distant future whose inhabitants live for hundreds of years on a ravaged planet earth in the oasis of the city. The city is an incredibly advanced utopia but an island of machines and somewhat bored inhabitants.
The main protaganist is the youngest member of the community who ventures out into a voyage of discovery and onto another community which has also survived the ravages of time. The reuniting of the two tribes of mankind each a distinct culture at opposite ends of the spectrum is problem and goal of "Against the Fall of Night".
This is science fiction storytelling at its best. A great story and a must have for all fans of the genre.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Bill R. Moore on January 5, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Arthur C. Clarke's masterpiece The City and The Stars (which I'm glad to note is back in print, which is loooooong overdue), is, in fact, an extended version of this early Clarke masterpiece. The City and The Stars is widely considered one of the greatest science fiction novels ever written, and with good reason. And, although I would agree with Clarke in saying that the later novel is the better of the two, this is a certifiable masterpiece in itself. Most all science fiction is, inevitably, set in the future, but this book is set in the far, far, far future. The world Clarke posits is a logical one, and is great as both a story and a warning. Far from being a dystopia, the city of Diaspar in the book is the genuinely archetypal Utopia. It is into this stagnant, decadent setting that Clarke creates one of his grandest visions. This book is sweeping in its vision and its prose. Clarke has always had a deft poetic touch, and this story contains some of his most beautiful outpourings of words. An absolutely essential read for any science fiction fan, as is the novel that it bequeathed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By OAKSHAMAN VINE VOICE on May 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
As I understand it, Clarke started plotting this novel out early in WW2 before he volunteered for the RAF. This would then technically make it his earliest novel- even though it didn't get published until 1953 by the legendary Gnome Press (first of the dedicated science fiction publishing houses.)

Clarke would later feel compelled to extensively rewrite this novel and release it under a different title (The City and the Stars.) Personally I prefer this version. The Technology is set over a ten billion years into the future so a mere 50 years or so since it was first published doesn't really "date" it.

This book doesn't share the high degree of hard science fiction detail that you find in most of his books. The technology is so advanced (machines never break down and read your mind to know what you want of them)that it seems more like magic. In fact, there is a statement that there are no more engineers in the world of the future since once the master robots started building themselves- and everything else- they were no longer needed and engineers faded away. I can identify with that, why work a thankless, unappreciated, arduous pursuit like engineering if the machines can do it better?

The cosmic sweep of this novel over vast intervals of time and the entire universe reads more like an Olaf Stapledon novel (a British science fiction author that died in 1950 and whose works Clarke was no doubt familiar with.)

If you like old-fashion space operas about the lost glories of the galactic Empire this book still weaves that classic atmosphere.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. L Wilson on November 4, 2007
Format: Paperback
Begun in 1937, Clarke finally finished it in 1946, his very first novel. I love sci-fi, and this didn't disappoint. Rousing good story from start to finish. Short, only 159 pages. At least, my copy. But hard to put down. I loved the way Clarke, who wrote this so many years ago, would use things of his time, and then extrapolate them to the future, as in the London Tube System - I think. For a book written over 50 years ago, it is still purely science fiction. It's only flaw is that Earth could not possible support life for the length of time he assumes - hundreds of millions of centuries. I also appreciate the way he subtly debunks religion as myths stemming from misinterpreted facts. Descriptions are easy to picture.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kpar on February 21, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I first read this book when I was 7 years old (my Mom had left it lying around). You may think it's a little advanced for a 7-year old, and I would agree, but I was a good reader and it hooked me on Sci-Fi for the rest of my life.

Clarke rewrote this story many years later as "The City and the Stars", but I don't think it was as good as the original- more up-to-date, and more "scientific", perhaps, but this was a better yarn...
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Thomas L. Gandet on February 7, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book first when I was probably 15, 45 years ago, and it became a book with a story that has haunted me my whole life. It has always seemed a masterpiece of science fiction and, with City and the Stars - a richer novel than Against the Fall of Night, but the title less so! - one of Clarke's finest works. I found its depiction of a human culture set billions of years in the future so alien to our own to be engrossing because the characterizations and mysteries as absorbing as they are strange. There are no real villains in the piece, and their world was one in which I wanted to live. I also identified strongly with the protagonist, who seeks to discover the secrets of his culture's lost past. The City of the novel, Diaspar, is as also a character in the story. I would recommend this novel very highly, especially to young readers. However, I must say that The City and the Stars, which is a later re-conception of Against the Fall of Night, is a much richer expansion of Against the Fall of Night, and it is the City and the Stars that has stayed with me for so many years.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?