and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Agamemnon of Aeschylu... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: **SHIPPED FROM UK** We believe you will be completely satisfied with our quick and reliable service. All orders are dispatched as swiftly as possible! Buy with confidence!
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $0.60
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Agamemnon of Aeschylus Translated into English Rhyming Verse with Explanatory Notes (TREDITION CLASSICS) Paperback – November 25, 2011


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.99
$13.99 $13.98
$17.99 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Agamemnon of Aeschylus Translated into English Rhyming Verse with Explanatory Notes (TREDITION CLASSICS) + Rhetoric (Dover Thrift Editions)
Price for both: $22.49

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: TREDITION CLASSICS
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: tredition (November 25, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 3842475640
  • ISBN-13: 978-3842475649
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,744,161 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Avery Gordon on May 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Being able to read these Greek classics in a verse form we're far more familiar with than the usual clumsy translation, is not only more pleasant, it gives these wonderful works back a grace they lose in translation more often than not. Great use of my Kindle.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. DeKalb on June 10, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Written circa 458 BC, the Agamemnon is the first part of Aeschylus' (es-kah-lus) Greek Tragedy `The Oresteia'. If you're unfamiliar with the Tragedies, they're generally pretty epic, with poetic leanings, much oft in the format of a play. According to a bit of Nietzsche, the Greeks are the pinnacle of `culture', and should thusly be heralded, espoused and held as an ideal toward the development and instillation of culture.

Much of the philosophical premise in Agamemnon is reliant upon `central there in both Greek tragedy and Greek religion: The fall of Pride, the avenging of wrong by wrong' (31) and the epitomal phrase `as every wrong is justly punished, every punishment becomes a new wrong, calling for fresh vengeance' (25). It is in this cycle that the Agamemnon of Aeschylus is invested. While appropriately pointing out mans erred nature: `men are boldened by a blindness, straying toward base desire, which bring grief hereafter' (204) and `not many men... can love a friend whom forture prospereth' (483), Aeschylus continues to remind us that the worst behaviors we see, were in men long ago. This accepted, how do we break a cycle where we know `Oh, doom shall have yet her day, the last friend cast away, when lie doth answer lie, and a stab for a stab returneth'? (790)

Commencing with a watchman discerning that the sign has risen that Troy has fallen, he begins to inquire of it's truth. Soon Menelaus returns and states that his brother Agamemnon has likely perished at sea but his body is unfound. He also states that on the occasion that they had been bewind, Agamemnon, after much struggle decided to sacrifice his daughter because `the sign' was agreeable and victory was ensured if the act was completed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By HFritz on November 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This translation of the play of Agamemnon was quite good and seemed to coincide with another translation that a friend of mine had.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Urszula Wudarczyk on July 11, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Personally, I had to buy another copy , a hard copy, because this version jus didnt sit well with me during class.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kayo Smada on May 21, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition
I often find that Greek plays are difficult to read. But I think the focal point of the play was whether one bad action justified another bad action. Do two wrongs make a right? At least the translations helped some with clarifications.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?