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Age of Inflation Paperback – July 1, 1979

ISBN-13: 978-0882791296 ISBN-10: 088279129X

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 270 pages
  • Publisher: Western Islands (July 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 088279129X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0882791296
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,452,640 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Liberty4all VINE VOICE on September 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
Although this book was written in the late 70s, most of it rings very true today. Sennholz, an Austrian school economist, discusses inflation, deficit spending and gold. One particularly interesting section is on the progression of the German economy from 1914-1948. The Germans established several programs during the period which in terms of trying to combat the inevitable inflation of deficit spending and pump up their economy may be relevant to our future.

One of the first things the Germans did under Hitler which raised the hair on my back, was to pump up auto sales. They didn't use Cash for Clunkers but they made anyone with an older car pre-pay for ten years of registrations. Of course, rather than pay, many citizens decided to buy a new car instead.

Another trick the Germans used to close budget deficits that may pop up in our future was to announce that those who pre-paid ten years of real estate taxes would be exempt from future taxes. (Of course when the German economy self-destructed by the end of WWII, I have no doubt that 'permanent' exemption was forgotten).

Finally, for fans of the gold standard, Sennholz briefly enumerates a step by step program to bring it back.

In closing, some of the book sounds a bit dated since it was written thirty years ago. However, what is surprising is how much of it is still relevant today, perhaps even more so. The deficits that Sennholz condemned are far bigger today. I highly recommend this book both for the Austrian perspective but also for the exposition on the German economy and how the government very cleverly avoided inflation even with big deficits but still destroyed the economy in the end.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tony on April 9, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Within the first few pages I found myself wondering, "Whose views could not be challenged by the common sense displayed by this guy?"

Though this is the first book I've read by Sennholz, I'm already a fan. In this work he showcases an effortless grasp of the inner-workings of the monetary system. He explains how monetization of debt, stimulative government spending, and the fed's manipulation of interest rates devalue the currency, and thereby lead to inflation.

I've since researched the author a bit and found that he has quite the personal history; from his days as a draftee in Hitler's Luftwaffe, to being shot down and becoming a POW, to his repatriation to his native Germany, on to his extensive schooling and eventual occupation as an American college professor--there's no doubt with me that he had a unique perspective on how the world worked.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Glines on January 23, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It tell you how inflation really works. It isn't a boring book at all.. The book is easy to understand.
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