Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.95
  • Save: $5.12 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 2 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for *FREE* super saver shipping. Amazon customer service with delivery tracking.Slight wear on edges and covers; otherwise item is in very good condition.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Age Power: How the 21st Century Will Be Ruled by the New Old Paperback – September 25, 2000


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.83
$0.85 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Age Power: How the 21st Century Will Be Ruled by the New Old + Marketing to Leading-Edge Baby Boomers: Perceptions, Principles, Practices & Predictions
Price for both: $34.81

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Tarcher; 1 edition (September 25, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585420433
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585420438
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #628,910 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Old simply isn't what it used to be," writes gerontologist Ken Dychtwald, bestselling author of Age Wave. In the 20th century, the number of Americans ages 65 and older increased from 3 million to 33 million. This number is likely to double by 2035! After 30 years in the field of aging, Dychtwald is convinced that "'Age Power' will rule the 21st century" and that "dramatic anti-aging breakthroughs" in supernutrition, hormone replacement, gene therapy, bionics, and organ cloning will be discovered in the near future.

This all sounds like wonderful news, except that Dychtwald fears that "we are woefully unprepared" for the aging of the boomers. He sounds a wake-up call to "the five social train wrecks we need to prevent." For example, society will face epidemics of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's (14 million Americans will have it by the mid-21st century). Tens of millions will live their long, last years in poverty. And living longer will be worthless if the elderly spend their last decades doing little more than watching television--40 million retirees average 43 hours a week of TV now!

Age Power describes the aging-related dangers ahead of us and solutions (both social and personal) for preventing them. "Tips to age-proof your life" at the end of many chapters help you put the points into action. "Many of the painful, punishing challenges of old age could be prevented if informed choices were made earlier in life," says Dychtwald, and although this serious book is not easy reading, it will help you make much more informed choices. --Joan Price --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

In a far-sighted and important report, Dychtwald warns that unless we productively integrate the elderly into all levels of our society, the U.S. will rapidly become an "elder wasteland." A psychologist, gerontologist and corporate consultant, Dychtwald's (Age Wave, Bodymind) new book is a wake-up call to debt-laden baby boomers heading toward poverty-stricken old age, to senior citizens and to society as a whole. He succeeds admirably, even though his presentation is weakened by catchy generalizations, facile predictions and lecture-circuit style ("The epicenter of economic and political power will shift from the young to the old" as the nation is transformed into a "gerontocracy"). Instead of a standard retirement at age 65, Dychtwald recommends "phased retirement" programs, long practiced in Europe, as well as more portable pensions. He advocates making self-care and disease prevention national priorities and calls for the creation of a National Elder Corps (loosely modeled on the Peace Corps). Some of his proposals will prove controversial, such as raising the age when Social Security and Medicare benefits begin or privatizing portions of Social Security. In Dychtwald's framework, "middlescence" (a greatly extended middle period of life, from age 40 to 60 and beyond) will afford countless boomers a second chance to fulfill their dreams. His optimism and openness to new ways of making the golden years productive render this book a thought-provoking and worthwhile read. Eight-city author tour. (Sept.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

The bestselling author of books such as Age Wave and Bodymind, Dr. Ken Dychtwald is a psychologist, gerontologist, lecturer, and the founding president of Age Wave, LLC. He is widely viewed as the nation's foremost authority on the aging."

Customer Reviews

As a sociologist, I have used Dr. Dychtwald's insightful analysis in the past.
Dr. Julia Partningson
Written in an informative manner for the general reader, I found his book fresh with ideas about how to understand the landscape of the future.
James Canton, CEO Institute for Global Futures author of The Extreme Future
Dychtwald's "Age Power" is a fascinating book about the implications that will come from the aging of 78 million baby boomers.
Amit Singh

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I have followed this author's work for many years and this is his best book yet!I would heartily recomend it. Ken Dychtwalds' book Age Power is the most comprehensive and insightful analysis of the impact of the Baby Boomers on society. Written in an informative manner for the general reader, I found his book fresh with ideas about how to understand the landscape of the future. From the impact on health care, business, economics and education, the "New Old" will rule, accordingly to Dychtwald, and after reading this thoughtful book I now know how. I found his suggestions for how to influence this future to be very interesting. He makes a convincing case for a higher level of social responsibility required by the aging baby boomers as we move into the 21st century. Age Power is a book that I will refer back to for a long time. I will use it as a guide for my personal and business planning.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 9, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Age Power is a compelling look at how our world will be forever changed by the aging of the enormously powerful boomer generation. I was particularly moved by the implications of the "age wave" on the lives of American families. How will millions of working Americans afford the simultaneous costs of funding their children's education, caring for elderly parents, and saving for their own retirement? Age Power is well worth the read for the chapter on the "caregiving crunch" alone, and Dr. Dychtwald's "financial wake-up call" includes invaluable tips on "age-proofing" your life. If you're looking for a thoughtful explanation of the greatest challenges we will face as individuals and as a society in the next century--as well as practical solutions--don't miss this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amit Singh on January 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Dychtwald's "Age Power" is a fascinating book about the implications that will come from the aging of 78 million baby boomers. As other reviewers have noted I was extremely interested on the social aspects of the aging of the boomers in the coming decades. What will the future look like in the United States and other industrialized nations in 2025? Will the boomers still influence society as greatly as they do now? Dychtwald believes that they will, and to prepare for the next millennium, boomers need to ensure that they will be financially secure. Dychtwald provides interesting questions and answers for this generation.
Not to disparage the book, but I felt that Dychtwald could have focused more on Anti-Aging technology that is currently being developed. As with computer technology, the biotech industry is progressing at great leaps. And with the Human Genome Project being completed in either 2002 or 2003, anti-aging therapies willsure follow. If they do, the aging of the boomers will not be a huge problem since retirement would be eradicated with the anti-aging treatments. The Baby boomers would then need not worry about aging as they (and their pets [dogs, cats, etc.]) would live long and healthy lives, probably indefinitely.
Still, one must ponder what role will the Baby Boomers play in the 21st century.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Francis J. Wuest (fwuest@lvnworth.com) on October 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Dychtwald presents hard data to build the case for the need for all of us to prepare for the impact of the boomer bulge in the aging population. He recommends actions we can take as individuals. They may apply more to boomers than to geezers like me, but he is on target. There is a political subtext which suggests the need for political awakening to respond, something like a revitalized Gray Panthers, The Almost Gray Panthers. The vision must be broader than that offered by AARP or by boomers concerned about taking care of themselves. Dychtwald is underscoring a national issue which will affect all of us. Read this book. Become engaged.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Shalom Freedman HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is an extremely interesting and important book. It seeks to identify the major social trend of the human future, and indicate ways it can be shaped for the benefit of us all.

The dramatic rise in the average length of life which took place in the twentieth century is according to Ken Dychtwald going to continue in the future. The great cohort of the Baby Boomers, seventy- six million strong is moving into 'Old Age' and they will bring with them new demands and even a new definition of the condition of 'Old Age'.

As the author sees it we are moving toward a 'gerontocracy' where the older segments of the population will have more and more power, not only in the market- place, but in determining the values and priorities of society as a whole.

For Dychtwald the fact that more and more people will live longer and longer lives, and will be an increasingly large proportion of the population raises challenges for Humanity as a whole of a kind we have not faced before.

Will Old Age become as it is for so many now a story of chronic illness, increasing disability? Or will the new technologies and medicines that are emerging enable for most a transformation where not only the age of old age will be pushed backward, but where a new ' cyclic' kind of life- style will begin with people starting new careers, new lives, new worlds of interest in old age?

The questions are many and Dychtwald provides a text which is tremendously rich in information and suggestions.

He points to the fact that the United States is not now really preparing itself for this dramatic demographic change. And he indicates that nonetheless many prescient and active individuals are moving toward extending their lives in a healthier and better way.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search