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Age of the Pussyfoot Mass Market Paperback – October 12, 1977


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (October 12, 1977)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345271297
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345271297
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,541,637 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "heyjayman" on December 17, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I last read Age of the Pussyfoot in Bipohl in 1985, so I didn't "get" it. While cleaning out the attic, found it again and read it. Flash forward to 2003: PDA's, pagers, cell phones, the Internet, DVD players and home theater, Designer Drugs, and senseless violence on the streets. I now "get" it, especially how a society that can, in theory, live forever may find unusual ways to vent off, like taking out a license for murder! What I still don't "get" is how Frederik Pohl could have imagined such a future in the early 60's, when this wasn't even in Science Fiction. Reading it again in 2003 gave me a creepy feeling and a new respect for Pohl
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 23, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The basic plot is that a man dies, is frozen for 500 years and is eventually revived to find... Contrary to the previous review, the joymaker (not joybringer) is an incidental part of the story, just a gadget that lets you communicate with the master computer (among other things). The real story is about the effect on society of a combination of affluence and "death reversal" technology (making them bold in some ways and wimps in other ways). It kept my attention, but was really odd.
One unusual part of the book is that it includes an afterward by the author to convince us of the soundness of his proposed future (the book was written in 1968). He justifies all kinds of details, including aliens, but leaves out any mention of what to me was the most ill-conceived part of the book, the future attitude towards murder.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Randall Black on March 1, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Fantastic future-based situations juxtaposed with down to Earth human problems, like paying bills and getting a job. Pohl follows a regular guy frozen and awakened in the distant future. Interesting financial problems ensue. The cost of living is about the same, except the standard of living is wilding inflated. Being broke is a longer drop, especially when people can duel and only the rich can afford the medical costs. Would-be cryoheads take heed.
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By Laurel on August 4, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is out of print and humorous. A man is frozen in 1969 and brought back to life 500 years in the future. He argues with his cell phone. It warns him of danger in such a way that he is unable to understand what the phone is talking about. The phone uses what appears to be obscure language. But, the phone is called a Joymaker, as the other reviewers have stated. It is a phone, credit card and the internet all rolled into one. If you want information on a topic you ask your phone for it. Therefore the future people are dependent upon it, and lost without it. They can't decide what they want to do on a Saturday Night without asking their phones what to do. The phone is supposed to advise them on avoid dangerous areas and suggest parties that their friends are having that evening. If you have no phone you become a homeless person. If you run out of money on your account your phone will stop working, and you will become a homeless person, and there is no safety net. They are also at War with race of aliens called the Sirians. There is a lot of action in the book. It is not one of those boring science fiction books. So, hopefully they will reissue it.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I remembered the front and back matter and the story of how he projected the technology from the first dial up computer access. I just didn't care much for the story itself.
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