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47 Reviews
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A much needed book. A must read.
"Agile Testing" is an excellent and must-needed book related to testing in agile product development. Much has been written about test-driven development on unit level, however, little has been written on higher level testing and the role of testers and test departments in Agile development. This book changes that!

The book consists of 6 parts. The first part...
Published on January 7, 2009 by Bas Vodde

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78 of 83 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but a little bit too soft
I think this book is a little overhyped. Don't get me wrong. The book offers many interesting insights and experience reports about how testing can be organized by an agile team. However, in my opinion, much of them are "common sense" or were already explored in other sources (as some reviewers stated: "more about agile than agile testing"). For example, suggestions like...
Published on April 24, 2010 by Paulo Sergio Medeiros


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for full understanding of testing in Agile world, January 28, 2013
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This review is from: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Paperback)
This is a great book to not only get the simplistic approach to testing in the agile world, but also to take the lessons learned and apply them in a real world environment. I recommend this not only to testers, but also programmers that need to apply testing principles in their sprint.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but Disjointed, July 11, 2012
By 
NSAES (Walbridge, VT) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Paperback)
I ordered a different Agile book, but the seller sent this used one by mistake. I paid less than half the new price, which is about what it's worth based on subject matter and presentation.

This book has a lot of good information based on a dedicated tester's perspective, and also provides some limited insight into what Agile software development is about. Thus, it's a good informal introduction for the uninitiated.

The book is interlaced with frequent short anecdotes, some merely distracting but some useful. OTOH, the anecdotes do break up what could otherwise be a laborious read. Your mileage may vary.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Big help if you're new to Agile testing, February 7, 2010
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This review is from: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Paperback)
I picked up this book as a recommendation from a coworker. I currently work on large team which is spread over 3 geographic locations. We are in the process of switching to agile, it's only our second release using/trying agile. This book answered a lot of questions I had about where and how QA/Testers would fit with in an agile environment.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Practical. As it says on the tin., April 1, 2011
By 
Mr P R Morgan "Peter Morgan" (BATH, Bath and N E Somerset United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Paperback)
Agile software development has moved on since the early days of "we don't need specialist testers; we are all testers now" and this book reflects the growing maturity. Both authors have been involved in the day-to-day testing activities on agile projects for a number of years. The personal experience shines through.

Interspersed in text are episodes from real projects accredited to one or other author: `Lisa's story' or `Janet's story' as appropriate, with occasional examples from elsewhere. It is a sound practical book, with lots of examples. The emphasis is not prescriptive, but very much "try this, it may work" or "it worked for us".

Even if not involved in an agile development methodology, it could give you ideas to strengthen testing and the development process itself. It is aimed at testing in an agile environment, but listen to this: when consideration documentation, ask two questions. Who is it for? What are they using it for? Don't we all need to hear that!

The authors don't necessarily expect readers to start on page one and proceed sequentially to the end. There are frequent forward and backward pointers to other sections and some readers will dive into the book to seek answers for specific questions. (Maybe "Does `agile' work if there is no test automation?") The aim is not to convince a reader of the merits of agile development, but there will be points of interest that will benefit many, even those who are rigidly set against the whole agile family of development processes. One strength of the book is that `agile' is not defined in detail - there are flavours and many firms "do agile differently". Even if you are involved in pseudo-agile (sequential waterfall, masquerading as agile), you will benefit.

So in strongly recommending this book, I would like to mention some good solid items from within.

If your metrics aren't helping you understand your progress towards your goal, you may have the
wrong metrics

Estimates are only that

Projects succeed when people are allowed to do their best work

In testing, start with a thin slice - the easiest route though the process, considering simple
parameters/inputs etc. that succeed.

Tests are not temporary but testers are (told with candour and humour, a story in which the author
is laughing against herself.)

Look for low-hanging fruit.

Strangling legacy code by re-writing it test first.

The power of three rule. If tester and developer cannot agree, grab a customer.

Learn from each release, to make the next one better

There are many other one-liners that you can find for yourself. If involved in software development in general or testing in particular, read it. It will do you good.

Peter Morgan, Bath, UK (morganp@supanet.com)
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Only recommended if you are new to agile, December 22, 2009
This review is from: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Paperback)
Almost all of the material in this book is just a review of standard agile practices. If you are new to agile then it gives a good overview and will serve as a good guide. Otherwise it doesn't bring any new insight.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great book for your test toolkit, November 27, 2014
By 
There is definitely a place for this book in a testers toolkit. I find this a very useful book for a number of reasons.
1/ topics and sub topics are clearly delineated. You don't need to read big chunks of text to get a particular concept explained
2/ the book is written in language that makes it accessible to both those that are skilled within agile and those that are just starting the journey
3/ context through personal stories adds a very nice change of learning perspective when it is used
4/ the book is full of "common sense". So many people read or hear things and comment "everyone knows that, it's common sense". But this is common sense explained, placed in context. It enables those with less experience to learn and those with experience to think about things they do and why. Common sense never guarantees that a person actually executes a process or understands why they execute it.
5/ it is a fun read. The book is written with a real positive tone.
6/ most importantly - I'm learning plenty from this book, both in the way of new thoughts and reminders. I've recommended this book widely at my office and to other test colleagues.
My summary - this book is great value. This isn't a read and move on book. It is a book that should be revisited to remind yourself about approaches within the agile process.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding book!, September 9, 2009
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This review is from: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Paperback)
There are very few materials available that discuss Testing in the Agile environment, and with this book there needs not be that many others. This book helps avoid reinventing the wheel for teams and individuals crossing over from waterfall methodology, and affirms intuition about what's necessary and not in a new QA environment. I keep in on my desk as a reference.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive guide and reference for how to test on an agile project, March 22, 2009
This review is from: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Paperback)
This is an excellent book that deserves to be read by every tester on an agile project--and since agile projects largely try to do away with specific roles, everyone tests, making this a great book for almost anyone on an agile team. The book starts by laying groundwork by defining what agile testing is and describing ten principles for doing it. Part 2 touches on the organizational changes that will be felt by the testing or QA group as the company transitions to agile.

Part 3 is probably the centerpiece of the book. It is structured around four testing quadrants initially conceived of by Agile Manifesto co-author Brian Marick. These quadrants allow Crispin and Gregory to cover a broad range of topics including exploratory, UI, API, usability, performance, stress, and reliability testing. The book definitely goes beyond the basics and the authors don't shy away from challenging topics.

Part 4 covers automation, a topic that should be on the minds of any agile team. One of my favorite sections in this part is the discussion of barriers to automation. The advice here should help many teams overcome some of the resistance created by these barriers. Part 5 is an interesting section that brings the ideas of the book together by walking chronologically through the typical events of an iteration and focusing on the activities of testers at those times. Part 6 concludes with a short list of critical success factors.

I like that this book is both universal and personal. It is chock-full of universal, practical advice but the author's make liberal use of sidebars in which they tell their own personal stories. This combination of telling us how something should be done and then adding detail in the form of how they did it works very well. By the end of the book you have learned a great deal about testing and these two world-class testers.

Very highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Must have for an Agile team member, July 10, 2014
Must read for anyone in software development. This book stresses ATDD, importance of upfront collaboration, talks about testing in Agile world, Agile tester mindset and how proper intention can amplify the value of testing..I'd say every page is valuable. Authors are making second edition of this book and I'd certainly buy that one too.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Practical Guide with Great Advice, January 27, 2014
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This review is from: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Paperback)
This was a great book on how testing can be accomplished in an Agile team. We use Scrum at work, and it is difficult to get the testing done in short iterations. This book taught me that the testers can be involved at the planning, through programming, and into a release. It also taught me the importance of test automation to meet deadlines. It was easy to read and very practical.
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Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams
Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams by Lisa Crispin (Paperback - January 9, 2009)
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