Agnes Grey and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Agnes Grey (The World's Classics) Paperback – August 29, 1991


See all 128 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, August 29, 1991
$5.95 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: The World's Classics
  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (August 29, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192827111
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192827111
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 4.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (72 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,146,914 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Novel by Anne Bronte, published in 1847. The strongly autobiographical narrative concerns the travails of Agnes Grey, a rector's daughter, in her service as governess, first to the unruly Bloomfield children and then with the callous Murrays. Agnes's sole consolations in this dreary life are the natural environment and her blossoming relationship with Weston, the local curate, whom she eventually marries. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

This book is in Electronic Paperback Format. If you view this book on any of the computer systems below, it will look like a book. Simple to run, no program to install. Just put the CD in your CDROM drive and start reading. The simple easy to use interface is child tested at pre-school levels.

Windows 3.11, Windows/95, Windows/98, OS/2 and MacIntosh and Linux with Windows Emulation.

Includes Quiet Vision's Dynamic Index. the abilty to build a index for any set of characters or words. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Anne leaves the love of her family to become a governess.
C. M Mills
This is the second book I've read of the Bronte sisters, "Jane Eyre" being the first one (which was amazing and my favorite of all the classics).
K. Leask
I usually don't put such a low rating on the books I read but I found this book to be very boring.
Bepa4

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 67 people found the following review helpful By "kaia_espina" on October 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
After reading "Wuthering Heights" (by Emily), "Jane Eyre" (by Charlotte), and "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" (by Anne), I found myself slightly disappointed by the lack of passion and romanticism in Anne Bronte's "Agnes Grey". This novel truly is simple, unpretentious, and down-to-earth--and, therefore, far too easy to underestimate and undervalue.
The title character is the younger daughter of a poor family, who seeks employment as a governess in order to help her parents make ends meet. This noble act of maturity on her part earns her nothing but disillusion, humiliation and hardship in the hands of the tyrannical children and over-indulgent parents of Wellwood House (Note the intriguing initials W.H., which stand for Wuthering Heights and Wildfell Hall in other Bronte books) and, later, Horton Lodge. For several chapters, Anne Bronte does not do much but--dare I say it?--complain about the lot of the Victorian governess. Though her portraits of the children and their parents were obviously drawn from reality, which certainly won sympathy from me, I wanted to tell her to "Get on with the story" many times.
The plot does pick up after the artful and exasperating Rosalie Murray has her "coming out" ball. Thoughtless rather than tyrannical, Rosalie has the most well-drawn character of all of Agnes' charges, which makes her such a great foil for Agnes. Rosalie delights in thinking that she could have any man she wishes and enjoys nothing more than toying with men's hearts. When she finds out that Agnes might be in love with the curate, Edward Weston, she makes every attempt to make Mr. Weston fall in love with _her_, thinking that it would be a grand joke to make Agnes miserable. Yet it is impossible to hate her, somehow.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Catherine S. Vodrey on April 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
Anne Bronte constructs a vivid Victorian world in AGNES GREY, which isn't surprising since it's drawn so strongly on her own experiences.

Agnes is a dutiful clergyman's daughter who goes into the world to seek employment as a governess in order to contribute to her family's financial well-being. Her several positions are described with deadly accuracy--the bratty children, the yapping dogs, the secretly disdainful other servants, the uninvolved parents. All are rendered here in minute and telling detail.

Agnes's familial background--and the familial background of Anne Bronte, of course--makes her especially well-suited to describing a local cleric she dislikes: "His favourite subjects were church discipline, rites and ceremonies, apostolical succession, the duty of reverence and obedience to the clergy, the atrocious criminality of dissent, the absolute necessity of observing all the forms of godliness, the reprehensible presumption of individuals who attempted to think for themselves in matters connected with religion, or to be guided by their own interpretations of Scripture, and occasionally (to please his wealthy parishioners), the necessity of deferential obedience from the poor to the rich--supporting his maxims and exhortations throughout with quotations from the Fathers . . . But now and then he gave us a sermon of a different order--what some would call a very good one; but sunless and severe: representing the Deity as a terrible taskmaster, rather than a benevolent father . . .
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
In the beginning I thought that I wouldn't like this book because of the period in which it was written (Victorian Era). I liked this book because of the plot and characters. The love story, adventure, and decision making in this book, make it extremely interesting. The young girl is immersed in a wealthy society even though she is not wealthy herself. The portrayal of the differences in classes are evident. In this book, the young girl is a governess. It shows the frustration and feelings that a governess goes through. This book was incredibly easy to get into. The writing style made the reading a simple task. Many people have not read any books by the third Bronte sister, and I would recommend reading this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By C. M Mills TOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
Imagine an evening at obscure Haworth parsonage in the depths of Yorkshire! Three female geniuses sat in the tiny parlor writing away at classics which will live forever. Emily with Wuthering Heights; Charlotte the eldest noted most for Jane Eyre. And then there is Anne....the least well known of the girls. In her short life (1820-1849) she wrote two novels: Agnes Grey and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall which stand up well in the annals of English fiction.

Agnes Grey is a short novel of under 200 pages. It tells the story of Agnes Grey the daughter of an impecunious Church of England pastor. Anne leaves the love of her family to become a governess. She works for the horrible Bloomfield family noted for their son's torture of small animals; the bumptiious and repulsive hunting father and the snobbish mother. Disgusted with this family Miss Grey goes to the aristocratic family the Murrays. This is a wealthy family which is self-centered and as cold as a brisk day on the Yorkshire moors. Rosalie and Matilda are the two sisters who are to be taught by Agnes. They are shallow and ignorant girls. Rosalie weds a rich older man to get his estate but is very disappointed in her marriage.

Agnes finds happiness with the altruistic and kind clergyman the Rev. Weston.

The novel is plainly told with honesty and conviction. The life of a governess caught in the limbo between that of servant and family member is well captured. Women in the 19th century had a dfficult time if they had to support themselves outside of the home.

There have many copies of novels about governesses by Anne in Agnes Grey and Charlotte in Jane Eyre are at the top of this type of story.

Anne Bronte deserves to be read and appreciated for her literary gifts.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?