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Aguirre, the Wrath of God


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Product Details

  • Actors: Klaus Kinski, Ruy Guerra, Helena Rojo, Del Negro, Peter Berling
  • Directors: Werner Herzog
  • Writers: Werner Herzog
  • Producers: Werner Herzog, Daniel Camino, Hans Prescher, Lucki Stipetic
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: German (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), German (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Starz / Anchor Bay
  • DVD Release Date: October 24, 2000
  • Run Time: 93 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (151 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305972761
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #116,671 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Aguirre, the Wrath of God" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Klaus Kinski, Ruy Guerra. Werner Herzog directed this surreal tale of a mad, power-hungry 16th-century conquistador who leads a doomed expedition through Spain in search of a lost city of gold. 1973/color/94 min/NR/German/subtitled.

Amazon.com

Quite simply a great movie, one whose implacable portrait of ruthless greed and insane ambition becomes more pertinent every year. The astonishing Klaus Kinski plays Don Lope de Aguirre, a brutal conquistador who leads his soldiers into the Amazon jungle in an obsessive quest for gold. The story is of the expedition's relentless degeneration into brutality and despair, but the movie is much more than its plot. Director Werner Herzog strove, whenever possible, to replicate the historical circumstances of the conquistadors, and the sheer human effort of traveling through the dense mountains and valleys of Brazil in armor creates a palpable sense of struggle and derangement. This sense of reality, combined with Kinski's intensely furious performance, makes Aguirre, the Wrath of God a riveting film. Its unique emotional power is matched only by other Herzog-Kinski collaborations like Fitzcarraldo and Woyzek. --Bret Fetzer

Customer Reviews

Aguirre, The Wrath of God is ultimately a brutally simple film.
Wing J. Flanagan
Herzog has crafted an absolutely mesmerizing film that is innovative and transporting.
Reviewer
So many movies can be summed up with the exact same description.
LF

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

172 of 176 people found the following review helpful By Myles Lucien on July 3, 2000
Format: DVD
One of the many documentaries circulating around the world film festivals at the moment is `My Best Fiend', which deals with the often strained love-hate relationship between the German director Werner Herzog and his Teutonic protégé, Klaus Kinski. Both highly egocentric personalities, bordering on narcissism, the documentary highlights the creative frisson at work, as well as the unbridled madness.
`Aguirre: The Wrath of God' is the culmination of their talents and arguably their best work. Ostensibly about the early 16th Century Peruvian expedition for a lost city of gold by the Spanish explorer Pizarro, the actual subject matter is about power and what some people will do to achieve it.
Staggeringly hypnotic and lyrical, this film ranks in my top five films of all time for the simple reason that it is incredibly dreamlike, yet ironically, the most realistic evocation of a historical period that has ever been portrayed on film.
Opening with a sweeping pan over a winding Incan trail, a team of Spanish conquistadors, Indian allies and native American and African slaves, beasts of burden and heavy artillery march down a steep incline. This is 1972 and there is no CGI, no trickery, Herzog actually forced his actors to lug a cannon around the Andes (and much more besides). Almost immediately a viewer will notice the menacing power of nature and the isolation of the expedition party. This isolation is what Aguirre calculatingly plays upon.
After the impressive opening, Pizarro's search for the city of gold (the Cibola of Peru) almost immediately runs into trouble. Uncertain of which direction to strike out for next, he divides his party into two and hands the leadership of the other party to a nobleman and assigns Aguirre as his lieutenant.
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68 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Reviewer on April 23, 2001
Format: DVD
An involving contemplation of the human condition, "Aguirre, Wrath of God," directed by Werner Herzog, is a pensive meditation on the nature of the species, an emotionally engrossing film that is visually stunning (it was filmed on location in the Amazon), insightful and imaginatively presented. The story begins in 1560, with Pizarro (Alejandro Repulles) and his army of conquistadors traversing the Andes in search of wealth, as in the wake of the conquest of the Incas some years before, the Indians began circulating stories of the legendary City of El Dorado, which purportedly held riches beyond measure. When they reach an impasse, however, Pizarro commands forty men to continue on down the river by raft, to seek out any Christian civilization that may be of help or able to lead them to their destination. He places Don Pedro de Ursua (Ruy Guerra) in charge, with Don Lope de Aguirre (Klaus Kinski) as his second in command, giving them one week, after which time if they have not returned, Pizarro and the rest will go back the way they came. Among the forty chosen to go on, are Ursua's wife, Inez (Helena Rojo), and Aguirre's fifteen-year-old daughter, Flores (Cecilia Rivera). But when this leg of the expedition goes awry as well, Ursua issues orders that they are to return to Pizarro; Aguirre takes exception to this, however, and rallies the men against Ursua, telling them to consider Cortes, who disobeyed when ordered back, and then went on to conquer Mexico. What the men do not realize at the time, is that Aguirre is a delusional madman with an agenda of his own, that actually has little to do with the acquisition of wealth, but everything to do with what he perceives to be his destiny as the "Wrath of God.Read more ›
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 22, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
Surely the greatest film to emerge from the New German Cinema movement, the visionary Werner Herzog follows a band of Spanish conquistadors as they journey down the Amazon river in search of the mythical lost City of Gold. Commanded by Don Lope de Aguirre (Klaus Kinski) who soon succumbs to megalomania and its disastrous consequences, the expedition is thrust into circumstances it can neither control nor escape, leading to inevitable doom...
"Aguirre, The Wrath of God" is intense. Herzog has created a film that feels unbearably realistic as he records his cast wandering around dazed and lost, sometimes looking directly at the camera in total despair. The soundtrack music, some haunting electronic soundscapes by Popol Vuh is kept to a minimum, and Herzog accentuates the tension by concentrating on the sinister quietness of the river and hazardous jungle. Kinski is sensational as the loathsome Aguirre, and as a metaphor for another notorious figure that embraced megalomania, the character takes on an even greater significance.
Shot by Herzog's regular cameraman, Thomas Mauch, the film is signposted with some extraordinary images - the opening where the conquistadors descend a mist shrouded mountain, a character who hallucinates to seeing a ship marooned upon a tall tree, and the final scene, where Aguirre is alone on his raft and over run with tiny monkeys is both astonishing and mocking...
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jazz fan from New England on September 30, 2009
Format: DVD
This is just a note about specs for the DVD of this wonderful film. It has a 4:3 (1:1.33) aspect ratio because that's how Werner Herzog shot the film and released it. (See his official website [...] for details). This is not a pan-and-scan release but the original theatrical presentation. Don't be put off because the DVD is full-frame, there never was any other version.
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