Aimard at Carnegie Hall

February 6, 2007 | Format: MP3

$11.49
Also available in CD Format
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 1, 2002
  • Release Date: February 6, 2007
  • Label: Warner Classics International
  • Copyright: 2002 Warner Classics, Warner Music UK
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:14:40
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0012FDVYO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #484,516 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By hjonkers on March 29, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is an absolutely spectacular disc with revelatory playing. It is often said that today's pianists aren't very interesting compared to artists of the past, but Pierre-Laurent Aimard proves exactly the opposite here. His recital at Carnegie Hall in December 2001 was a great event and it has fortunately been captured on disc. Throughout the whole disc you can feel the thrill that hangs over the event, particularly because of Aimard's spellbinding playing. I attended a splendid recital by him some time ago, and this disc contains exactly the same excitement that I felt over there. What makes Aimard's playing so fascinating is that he has a great `control' over his music, combined with a beautifully clear toucher, high expressivity and a gorgeous tone throughout. At every moment you listen to an artist who is in full command of the music he plays, however difficult the piece is. And what is more, he can also keep the longest and most complex structures in his hands. This is probably one of the great benefits of Aimard's modern training, as most modern music requires an enormous amount of concentration and clarity. He plays in fact all pieces on this disc with the same full-bodied, clear and expressive approach, and it works wonderfully as much in Beethoven as it does in Ligeti. It's also interesting to note that the program isn't an arbitrary combination but very well thought out: the first part consists of two densely architectural works, the Berg and Beethoven sonatas, while the second part contains three different kind of visual and imaginative pieces, evolving from Liszt and Debussy to Ligeti.Read more ›
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By "50cent-haircut" on October 26, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I'd only heard Aimard play Ligeti and Messiaen on disc, and it was a revelation for me to hear him play Beethoven, Liszt and Debussy. Although the Ligeti etudes lack the elan of his playing on his previous recording of the Books I and II, you can hardly argue with the man's love and conviction in the interpretation. The Appasionata is sublime. Apart from Brendel's EMI recording and Richter's, this is my favorite interpretation. There's a thrilling tightrope-walking here, between brio and control. It's an aristocratic sturm-und-drang performance that never preens in academia or rigid classicism. The Berg sonata is passionate, and the Liszt's Legende is poetic. His offering of Debussy is tantalizing here, especially given that in the CD booklet, he lets us know that his next recording will be of Debussy. All in all, a highly recommendable disc.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 15, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This is a stunning disk, enthusiastically recommended! There is a wide range of repertoire, beautifully reverberating Carnegie Hall sound, and awesome fingerwork. I'm a pianist presently learning the "Appassionata," and Mr. Aimard's version is suitably stirring and fiery (ripping all those diminished sevenths!). The review on the Amazon page said the last movement lacked in thrills, but that was decidedly not my impression. I got the feeling, though, that he was less comfortable with the 19th century pieces than with the 20th century ones. The Berg Sonata is a beautiful piece sensitively played: ever-shifting chromaticism in the service of Mr. Berg's Romantic temperament. The Messiaen fragment (only one movement out of 20!) jumps with rhythmic life in the middle section. The Debussy has a gossamer quality to it. This is an amazing pianist and musician, and I wish Teldec had released more of this recital on a double disk. The only caveat: if you don't like contemporary music (although Debussy and Berg can't really be considered contemporary if they composed 90 years ago), you may not like this disk.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Luke birkla on June 12, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The playing is always insightful, intelligent and fascinating. Throughout the recital there is never a dull moment, Pierre Laraunt Aimard has an uncanny ability, similarly to Michelangeli and Richter, to summon the work of art almost from the depths or bowels of the earth, and render the piece with visionary sweep. The pieces evolve and metamorphose in the most astonishing manner.
By all accounts this is a staturesque performance. One may disagree with certain readings, for example the Beethoven or Liszt, yet is this not true of all great artists? Great artists do not sit on the fence, they are visionary and although many will find the Beethoven to astringent at times, (the linear harmonic development is quite asperse)not for one second does the listener remain indifferent.
Aimard's forte seems to be in the soundworld of the Debussy and Ligeti. He brings to these pieces a unique tonal translucence; a liquid, pensive sheen graced with a sense of the ineffable.
In the Berg Sonata, Aimard is able to shape and nurture the contrapuntal strands, with cohesive and spontaneous inflection. This is something quite special, it is the best Berg I've ever heard. The Berg's majestic progression is amply projected and the rhetoric of the sonata leaves the music floating..afterwards.
The Messiaen is perfectly controlled. The atmosphere Aimard creates is spiritual. Many performers of Vingt regards etc, often lose the spiritual dimension, which after all inspired Messiaen. Aimard, though, seems to be fully aware of this,(he was after all taught by Yvonne Loriod, Messaien's wife)and so the performance sets a new precedent for the performance of Messiaen. The ending is out of this world...the audience are left in awestruck silence.
This CD presents so many directions.
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