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Air Safety Investigators : Using Science to Save Lives-One Crash at a Time Kindle Edition

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Length: 378 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 5958 KB
  • Print Length: 378 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1479728934
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Xlibris (November 15, 2013)
  • Publication Date: November 15, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BY2DV68
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #158,509 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Dr Diehl was an award winning aviation psychologist and accident investigator for manufacturers, the National Transportation Safety Board, FAA and USAF.

He developed a keen interest in aviation safety after narrowly surviving a crash. He began as an aircraft designer in 1967, investigated his first accident in 1969, and earned a PhD in 1974 to become an aviation psychologist.

A decade later, after Congress announced Airline Deregulation, NTSB officials hired him to identify the causes and cures for "pilot error." He introduced innovations such as Crew Resource Management training that dramatically reduced accidents, but he soon exposed FAA officials for lying to Congress.

The USAF then assigned him to investigate a Soviet crash that killed an African president and train Air Force One crews. But he blew the whistle on a major fratricide cover-up. Time magazine and ABC News broke the story in 1995.

Congress, the media and law firms have used him to examine civil and military aviation safety issues. His first book, "Silent Knights: Blowing the Whistle on Military Accidents and Their Cover-Ups," was nominated for a Pulitzer. His second book, "Air Safety Investigators: Using Science to Save Lives -- One Crash at a Time," is an ultimate insider's look at the problems and progress in this industry in recent decades. ABC's John Nance and Ralph Nader have recognized his important contribution to improving aviation safety.






Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By James Miholick on April 15, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Great Read! As a pilot and data analyst who spent decades working in this field, I enjoyed learning about Dr. Diehl's crusade to enhance aviation safety. I think ABC News aviation analyst John Nance was accurate in stating, "This book lays a deep foundation for understanding all this progress, and it does so through the eyes of a true pioneer, and without question, a true unsung American hero."

This expose' also describes the problems that had to be overcome, such as emphasis on profits rather than safety by some airlines. Diehl did a masterful job of explaining how his investigation of one airline's profit fixation created pilot fatigue and ultimately caused a fatal crash.

I was personally privileged to serve on The President's Commission on Aircraft Crew Compliment which led to the modern, highly automated, two-pilot airliners. And I certainly agree with Diehl's conclusions that this technology has enhanced safety, but has also lead to a host of new challenges in the human factors arena as evidenced by several recent crashes.

Furthermore, It was interesting to hear how Diehl launched Crew Resource Management training for the airlines, which drastically reduced accidents by improving crew coordination and judgement. And, as a former military pilot, I can testify that he is absolutely correct in asserting that CRM would be even more beneficial for our GIs. His poignant examples CRM-failure mishaps were painful to read for someone who has lost colleagues in similar crashes.

Lastly, the book vividly describes the difficulties this determined scientist faced working inside bureaucracies like the NTSB and FAA, and especially the Pentagon. I also personally know that military safety investigators need more independence. I'm just thankful there are people like Alan Diehl willing to sacrifice their careers to protect those of us who fly.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Wendell Smith on April 23, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
It is without reservation that I endorse and recommend Al Diehl's new book "Air Safety Investigators: Using Science to Save Lives -- One Crash at a Time." I have been a certified flight instructor since 1975. I have been involved in Aviation Law and Aviation Safety since 1983 as a practitioner and a teacher. I am convinced that the concept of Cockpit Resource Management (CRM), by whatever name, prevents accidents and saves lives. Al's book has been an eye opener. I had no idea the concept, with such obvious benefits to aviation safety, was met with such resistance by some people in the aviation industry. I appreciate the sacrifices he made to bring this concept out of the darkness and into practice.
Wendell K Smith J.D.
Certified Flight Instructor
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr R. J. Lofaro on April 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a great book and a must read for anyone wanting to understand what really occurs during aviation crash investigations. The author is the ultimate insider who also candidly describes the other things that must happen after the inquiry is finished to enhance safety. The manner in which he explains many of the important accomplishments of those of us who were Air Safety Investigators makes for enlightening reading.

Caveat of sorts: I have known the author for almost 30 years and long admired the skill and integrity he brings to this profession. When I read his earlier book, Silent Knights, it was clear that Dr. Diehl had exposed the shortfalls and cover ups in military accident investigations. It is heartening to see he has turned his attention to civil aviation investigations, using his personal experiences as a foundation. As always, he writes with clarity and directness.

The above is written as an aviation psychologist who has been a voting Board member of a U.S. Army Aviation Safety Center "go-team" for aviation accident investigation; an FAA researcher, manager, liaison to USAF Research Labs and Aeronautical Systems Center; professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and a prolific writer on human factors issues in aviation.
Ronald John Lofaro, PhD
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By HomerGuy on January 27, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The first half of this book is very interesting and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Lots on stories and examples of how human decision making, behavior, and design played a role in some very prominent aircraft crashes. It also delves into the involvement the writer had in making significant improvements into improving airline safety by highlighting the need to focus on these previously "voodoo" sciences.

Unfortunately the book takes a very abrupt turn about halfway through and essentially becomes a rant about how the author was right and everyone else was wrong. I believe the author as he details every time he got in an argument with a superior or blew the whistle on something. And I don't doubt the government's arrogant "head in the sand" attitude. However, the readability of the book really suffers. It is very monotonous with little to be learned.

The first half I couldn't put down. The second half had me wishing every page turn was the end.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By SchuylerKing on July 11, 2013
Format: Paperback
Only a few days after putting down Air Safety Investigators, Asiana Flight 214 crashed in San Francisco. Al Diehl's book was a clear reminder to ignore the uninformed hype of the Six O'clock News, and wait for the science to give us real answers. I spent 13 years investigating Air Force accidents, 16 years as an airline pilot, and have been flying since I was 15 years old. If you are still wondering how professional pilots could make such mistakes, you've got to read Air Safety Investigators.
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