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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't Let The Small Size Fool You.
My first impressions on the newest and smallest MPC in Akais great lineup of sampler/beat machine was thatit just HAD to be a lesser equiped version of those higher numbered MPC. WRONG!!!. I've used all MPCs and can say that I am pretty skilled with the MPC-60, 60 II, 2000, 200xl, and 3000 and just begining to peak at what the MPC4000 can truly do (it is in a whole...
Published on December 2, 2004 by Keys n MPCs

versus
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great, untill the pads started going out.
The mpc1000 is great fun, and has very accurate timing with no latency performance recording.

One by one, the pads started losing there response. After reading online i found many many others with the same problem who were able to narrow it down to poor engineering of the contacts under the pads. I know that the mpc2000 was engineered without this flaw, but i'm...
Published on August 30, 2008 by L. belden


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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't Let The Small Size Fool You., December 2, 2004
By 
My first impressions on the newest and smallest MPC in Akais great lineup of sampler/beat machine was thatit just HAD to be a lesser equiped version of those higher numbered MPC. WRONG!!!. I've used all MPCs and can say that I am pretty skilled with the MPC-60, 60 II, 2000, 200xl, and 3000 and just begining to peak at what the MPC4000 can truly do (it is in a whole different level and not at all for the novice).

The MPC1000, in my opinion is the best of the lot (not including the MPC4000). It doesn't have the warm sound that the MPC-60/60 II has but overall it can do anything that you want it to do. It does everything that a 2000/2000xl can do. It may have a smaller number of outputs but that is not that big of a deal if you know what you are doing.

Armed with a computer (as most of us are) the MPC1000 is extremely capable of accomplising any task that its big brothers can. In fact it handles many things better than those costing much more.

The MPC1000 is set up more like an MPC4000 and will aid those who hope to step up to using the big boy. Starting with a 2000 or 3000 will hinder you, in that some of those things you will do on those machines you will have to re-learn how to do those same things on the 4000 (once you pay the big bucks to make that move).

Don't be put off by it's tiny size. Max out it's memory, get a big compact flash card (it canhandle up to a 2 gig card, WOW) and this little box will STOMP the 2000 and 3000, even the 60 (remember those aren't made anymore and are quit old).

This thing KICKS.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hardware reigns Supreme, December 31, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Where do I even start? Lets get this rollin with some back ground music, this is what this machine is capable of:
[...]

These two tracks were made 100% by the MPC 1000, no computers or software what so ever.
I've had this think for several months now and I think it has been one of the most fun journeys of my life, I don't mean to sound corny but the amount of joy this thing can bring is just astounding.

That being said, if you're looking at this review then you probably aren't fooling around: you want to get serious about making music. If you're like me and have fooled around with some starter programs like FL Studio, but you just never got a good grasp on how to use the software, then this is absolutely the machine for you. And if the price tag is steep then you want to look at an MPC 500 or better yet look around for an old MPC 2000 or 2000xl.
By the way I recommend getting this newer black version of the 1000. There are known issues with the pads on some of the older "blue and red" models which are still fixable, given that the older model is certainly cheaper now than this model. The new black version comes with the pad "fix" already from the factory.

Everything about this machine is solid. It's where you feel okay about putting that much money down on it. One of the first things I noticed was the power plug on the back of the unit is hefty and screwed in tight with two large screws, it's just little things like that that I'm sure allow this to last for a lifetime. I haven't had a single hardware related issue yet.

What really makes this a stand out machine though, which I never realized at first (i thought it was all about the pads) is the sequencing. I mean from top to bottom this is a full on track-producer. There really isn't anything I have found that you can't do here. To break it down: you start by building a track, then melt each track together all under a sequence (the two are on the same main screen), then you compile the sequences together under the song screen.
Once you have every sequence melting together under SONG, you press one button and it converts all of the data BACK into a large sequence, from which you would record with.
Just as vital probably is the step edit page, from which you can edit each track note-by-note. Everything you need is in here. You can change the velocity of any given note, along with the timing and just about any other thing you can think of. There are so many little luxuries that this machine provides like a tempo change on the fly, at any time.

Also one of my favorite features is the 16 levels button. This allows you to take ANY sample, and turn one pad into 16, tuning up and down from which ever pad you select. Ideally this would be useful for say, a piano or key sample. It essentially will turn one key into a whole range and turns the machine into a keyboard. It really really gets you some crazy and different sounding sounds though if you use it on any sample, and it's probably my most used feature. By example, the first track i listed up top: the elec. piano/rhodes keys are a mixture of different chops and the 16 levels applied to them.

It's just so fun learning the ins and outs of the software. It really feels after a while like you dive in to this little world every time you press the power button, it's there pressed into the back of your head and in no time your fingers will be flying. But I strongly recommend you read the manual AND get hands on experience as you go. The manual can teach you a LOT of things that you might miss otherwise. And the manual is actually pretty well written and explanatory, despite the frequent misspells.

And speaking of software I recommend downloading the 3rd party software JJOS (just google akai JJOS and it will be the first site, it's a japanese server but everything is in english). Now at first you might hate this if you install it (don't worry you can factory restore to the original OS at anytime), because this software changes the way the pads work. You will have to go under the [OTHER] Screen and change your pad settings (how sensitive they are) VERY often. To this day it still seems to be the biggest setback of the JJOS, the original akai OS factory pad settings just work, without really any need to tweak anything. I found myself using the FULL button (automates the maximum velocity for each pad so that a sound is at it's loudest at every hit) MUCH more with the JJOS, and still do, which i feel takes a massive chunk out of the potential of the pads: you can play a snare or hi hat without the FULL button and it literally sounds like the real thing, but with it ON, its a solid boom bap, so you will have to find out ways to work around the pad deficiencies(i recommend normalize your samples if they are too quiet) .

WITH THAT BEING SAID: The benefits of the added features of the JJOS are simply irreplaceable. You won't being wanting to go back to the akai OS no matter how many pad frustrations or bugs you run into. For starters, there is a new note (paint) type window. You go into this screen and all of the notes that you laid down in the sequence are literally painted in little blocks on a grid, track by track, pad by pad. This is great for those coming from the FL studio type deals where you like to visualize your notes. It makes refining things super easy now, you simply go over to the note you hear and see and press delete (or copy/move). Granted the original OS and step edit allows you to delete notes just the same but once you get a lot of samples and programs running it can become a headache to find some of the notes you have laid down, and the JJOS visual window helps you find exactly what you are looking for.

Also with the JJOS are some added trimming features. One of the most notable is the trimming and waveforms. I can't even remember how the old OS worked but trimming is very fast now. You simply look at the waveform for the sample and use the scroll wheel to select the start/end points. But a huge advantage is now you can zoom in and out of the wave form as you navigate it. This means you can zoom all the way to the micro level and find your zero crossings if your Loops are popping at the end/start points.
Also there are other added features in the trim page like stripping a sample of the left or right channels, or adding or subtracting any combination of the two. For instance if you play an old record and the bassline is on the left channel and the drums are coming through the right, you can split the sample and strip either out of the mix, or add them together if the panning is just too extreme for the sample and you want to clean it up a bit.

Those are just the two biggest JJOS features, with many others that i just take for granted so I can't think of them.

Wow, to wrap this up I just have to say if you are looking at this page and really being serious about buying one, just go out and do it. Alone this is an extremely fleshed out stand alone machine, but for those of you who like the new school sound with the FL/reasons/pro tools and all that, this can be your foundation and you can perfect your craft with the software on your PC. There are just simply some things you can't do with software and ESPECIALLY without hardware. You can't sit at FL Studio and paint out a bangin drum track with a mouse that sounds like it's the real thing. And if you have had a little bit of experience with software and you want that HANDS ON experience, and just want to be able to pick something up and get results, than this is absolutely a vital machine if you take the time to learn the ins and outs.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great, untill the pads started going out., August 30, 2008
This review is from: Akai MPC1000 Music Production Center (Electronics)
The mpc1000 is great fun, and has very accurate timing with no latency performance recording.

One by one, the pads started losing there response. After reading online i found many many others with the same problem who were able to narrow it down to poor engineering of the contacts under the pads. I know that the mpc2000 was engineered without this flaw, but i'm not sure about the 2500 or the 500?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great machine but USB not MIDI transmittable, May 27, 2012
This review is from: Akai MPC1000 Music Production Center (Electronics)
I so wanted to be able to sit with my laptop & play some stuff I wrote and recorded into logic along with my new MPC1000 but alas, the USB port is ONLY for storing/transferring sounds. Does not transmit any MIDI signals or receive and MIDI signals. :-( So I need to have a USB to MIDI interface (another piece of hardware) before I can sync the two together.

It's my own fault for not doing the homework before I bought it but at a list price of $999 (!) you'd think the USB port would be able to do what synths and other machines with USB ports have been doing for over a decade.

As an MPC, I'm just learning the language and I'm pretty impressed with it. Remember everyone, this is a sampler/sample-playback module with pads and buttons. This isn't a drum machine with preset sounds. You don't just turn it on, call up a drum kit and start playing. You have to load samples from a CF card, internal HD if you have one installed, or from a computer via USB.

Gonna get some more sounds into this thing and start playing with it some more before I decide if I'm going to keep it or not.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Owner of MPCs since the 2000, January 25, 2014
This review is from: Akai MPC1000 Music Production Center (Electronics)
I've been a fan of midi controllers since i first got my SP303(which i still use within my setup). I've owned the mpc2000 then 2000xl, to a 3000( needed money at the time so had to sell it, i still regret it). Then finally i decided to buy the MPC1000 when it was still red and blue colors. So I've been an akai fan until the renaissance came out, only because that system cannot be standalone, you need a computer to turn it on, so its not an MPC by old definition. In fact they had to change their name for that machine. MPC used to stand for Music Production Center, but with the renaissance, its Music Production Controller... LAME... I'd rather get a Maschine if thats the case, because akai has been known to not come out with the most cohesive software. And this holds true with the 1000.

FIRST OFF, THIS THING SUCKED WITH STOCK HARDWARE... i mean at the time it was a lot money, so i would say it was worth it if you had money to spend. THIS REVIEW IS FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE FAMILIAR WITH ANALOG CONTROLLERS. - If you never used one i suggest stick to your DAWs in this day and age(they're highly capable), its always difficult to learn backwards with technology because by the time you want to learn the new equipment, your already far behind. Cause it's all about workflow!

CONS of stock parts:
-Plastic menu buttons will break, no matter how you up keep your machine it will happen because of their design.
-Original pads were horrible and die out quickly. My main gripe about the original stock ones are that the pads were individually divided to their own separate stand alone electrical board. In the past when you open up a MPC all 16 buttons would be one big single sensor board. And the rubber pads would be all connected in one sheet. This helped with the feel and sturdiness of the pads. The individual pads lose sensitivity too quickly. (this problem got fixed with the later models).
-Software was horrid. okay it wasn't that bad you can work your way through it but there were so many work arounds to get to a single setting. This made the workflow of people changing from 2000s slow down to a sluggish pace.

So all this bad talk but i still rated this 4 stars??
All of these mistakes are fixable. you can upgrade your parts by ordering them from venders and customizing your machine. It makes you feel like this instrument is really unique to your personal settings. SO mainly this equipment holds sentimental value.

** I mainly use vinyl records since my collection is too big to transfer to digital now, although it takes up a whole room in my house i can't convince myself to let go of them.
*Don't get me wrong, I plug instruments into this too, this is not just a "sound box" if you get to know your way around the machine it can be used a completely in box center.

Pros:
-buttons are replaceable. no biggie, so just be more gentle next time ;)
-pads are upgradable, hell, last time i checked you can even pick the color for the rubber from online vendors. if you have the old pads you will have to cough up about an extra bill for them, but you won't regret it.
-SOFTWARE JJ.OS IS A MUST!!!! trust me you'll never look back and think that you need to revert to akai's operating system.
-JJ OS IS A MUST

did i mention that you should probably get jj os if you have this equipment. That os is probably what makes me enjoy this piece of equipment. Without it i don't think i would have rated this 4 stars for sentimental value. Put it this way, its 2014 and I still use this machine, it has it's longevity when used correctly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One awesome piece of equipment!, December 23, 2011
By 
Rezivor (Spokane,WA.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Akai MPC1000 Music Production Center (Electronics)
I bought the Akai MPC1000 back in 2006. It was the 3rd drum machine I purchased, and the most expensive. Yet, it was they easiest to learn. And obviously the greatest of my drum machines. The 1000 has a lot to offer for anyone with the will & creativity to learn and produce instramentals. It comes with a decent size card to save sequences. It has a built in sound bank with a decent amount of sounds. I personally buy digital sound kits online, and then save the sounds into my card. You. Can do damn near anythng you can think of. In my opinion, this is the perfect drum machine to even start off with! If your just getting into producing beats with real equipment not programs sounds, then just go for it with this! Cheapere one's don't do nearly as much, nor are they as easy to figure out. And now's the best time to get one. Cause after insurance and everything on mine, when they we're still relatively new. I paid $2,000.00
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tutorial, November 8, 2013
This review is from: Akai MPC1000 Music Production Center (Electronics)
Great product. The instructions can be a little convoluted sometimes. So I found some great tutorial videos online. Making my own beats now!

[...]
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4.0 out of 5 stars MPC1000 review, July 16, 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Akai MPC1000 Music Production Center (Electronics)
like it and it turned out how i wanted it to be. I replaced parts myself..i was just a bit disappointed that i never been provided a password to JJOS 3.08(had problems with that OS) but that's ok i downgraded and bought JJOS1 since i myself is a beginner.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Beat making hardware at a resonable price, May 29, 2009
By 
Beyoung Yu (Portland, Oregon) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If your serious about making beats and want to enjoy the process go with this mpc. I recommend getting the JJOS software for this since It is much better than Akai's. I most of my beats on this,

you can check them out and see what this product is capable off

myspace.com/inbeyoungwetrust
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Industry Standard!, November 17, 2010
This review is from: Akai MPC1000 Music Production Center (Electronics)
I love this beat machine. see what i did with mine at [...]. Also, you MUST purchase drum kits for it. You can get some at [...]. They are fully customizable as well. i would also recommend purchasing ram and the MPC hard drive Kit.
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Akai MPC1000 Music Production Center
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