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Akira, Vol. 3 Paperback – July 10, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Akira (Dark Horse) (Book 3)
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse Manga; Gph edition (July 10, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569715254
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569715253
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #822,124 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

In 1982, manga modernist Katshuhiro Otomo created a worldwide literary sensation when Japan's Kodansha Publications released the first volume of his 3000 page sci-fi fable of the apocalypse, Akira. Few westerners had experienced manga (Japanese comics) before Akira, and its rocketing ascent through cultural divides helped impress a cynical world that had long been convinced that pictures in books should be relegated to children's stories. Now pictures were being used to tell one of man's most explosive and harrowing tales. Since his groundbreaking work on Akira, Mr. Otomo has completed a number of inspired manga classics, including the powerful post-apocalyptic Legend of Mother Sarah and the dark study of a child's dreams, Domu. Otomo's mastery of the manga artform was recognized with a top Japanese book award, the Grand Prix, awarded to him in honor of Domu in 1989. Dark Horse Comics published the first English-language versions of The Legend of Mother Sarah and Domu, and is currently publishing a true-to-its-original-form, black-and-white, six-volume re-issue of Akira.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Daniel V. Reilly VINE VOICE on May 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
Volume Three of Katsuhiro Otomo's epic sci-fi saga finds the newly awakened Akira being pursued by Kei and Kaneda, the Army, Nazu's militant faction, weirdly-powered flying children, strange Government robots, etc.
After being freed from his cryogenic sleep by Tetsuo in the last volume, Akira is still groggy, and so we really don't get any insight into his character, and he doesn't become an active participant in the story until the very end of the book. What an ending, though! After this, the series spins off into totally unexpected territory. This volume seemed like mostly filler, though. The story is basically just a lot of people playing "keepaway" with Akira; He's stolen from Kaneda by the flying kids, Nazu snatches him from the flying kids, etc. Like most long stories (In any medium), the middle lags.
Otomo's art continues to be mind-boggling. The amount of detail in every panel is incredible, and you could just linger over the art all day. Even at three stars, Akira 3 is better than most other comics....
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
Why on earth are people so concerned with the number of pages? Who cares?!! This third installment of the series is by far the most emotionally and graphically charged part of the story to date. The characters and the complex web of fate that entwines them are explored in much greater depth. The political factions and their agendas are brought to light. Relationships develop between the characters and new characters shed a whole new light on understanding the world of Neo-Tokyo and its political climate. In general the story takes focus and burns a hole right through to the last page as Akira and his devastating power "awaken". Graphically stunning. An epic story that continues to grow in scope. Unbelievable. Otomo is an unrivaled master of the medium.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Alan J. Mattia on August 15, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book was hard to get a copy of, but I finally managed to get my hands on one yesterday. Like the first two volumes, I read it straight through as soon as I got home. I hadn't planned to do that, but it was so good I couldn't put it down.
This volume is the smallest so far in terms of the number of pages, but it is almost non-stop action from first page to last. Akira is awake, but still groggy from his long sleep. Multiple groups want to capture and control him before he fully wakes up. You can't skip a page if you want to keep track of who has Akira from one moment to the next.
Lots of action, lots of firepower, lots of destruction. I can't wait for volume four.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Saiyajinzoningen on October 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
If you know of the Akira Anime this Manga should be of no surprise; however, there are some definite differences that will become evident upon reading. 1st off the anime is way way shorter and edited to such an extent that most casual watchers are left feelin confused. These books will clear up any problems you may have had with the movie and expand upon the foundation the movie laid out. Be aware these books not in color.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ron Tothleben (tothleben@hotmail.com) on August 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
Another fine installment in the Akira series in my opinion. The book has (yet again) less pages than the previous volume (book I - 364 pages, book II - 300 pages, book III - 280 pages of which a big segment is an even quicker read than any of the previous parts) but it doesn't fail to impress ... again.
After Tetsuo got Akira out of the ground at the Olympic site (in volume II) their time together doesn't last long when Tetsuo mysteriously disappears (for almost the entire book), and Kaneda and Kei take a confused and dazed Akira with them. Neo-Tokyo turns out to have changed into a battle-ground where chaos rules as a result of the Colonels 'safety measures' (last volume). Martial Law has been declared. What follows is an almost volume-wide "hunt for Akira" that takes place all over the ravages of neo-Tokyo in which each 'competitor' (such as the Colonel and his project-members, the government, the rebels and the mysterious Lady Miyako) has it's own reasons to get their hands on him. The rebel group even splits into two parties when it turns out there's a traitor among them. Akira himself is letting everything happen as it may. He is 'up' but not fully 'awake' yet. But it's just a matter of time before he WILL awake and become the enormous force that legends tell he is, but nobody is able to predict how long that will take. Nor does anyone know what to do when it will happen.
Storywise this book makes the least progress of all three volumes that are published at this point in time, which I don't neccesarilly mean to say as a bad thing. It's just that each scene gets even more exposure, more pages, than each scene has had so far (which was already big) and so you're at the end of the volume before you know it, without the story being that much further.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Blue Tyson on September 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
With an emergency situation declared, the spooks and pollies start manoeuvring. The Colonel is not going to take the blame, and instigates a military takeover, after Kaneda and Kei have escaped with Akira.

More of the psionic children come out to play. A confrontation with the Colonel causes the death of one of these children, and this sets the awesomely powerful Akira off.

Neo-Tokyo gets it in the head, again.
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