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Albany Street Kid: A Wry Look Back at the '40s Kindle Edition

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Product Details

  • File Size: 657 KB
  • Print Length: 250 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0615735215
  • Publisher: Stone Pine Books, Patri Publications (September 17, 2012)
  • Publication Date: September 17, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009CZM3PY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #851,100 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By megan on September 28, 2013
Format: Paperback
On a recent cruise to the Caribbean (invited by friends) I decided to hunker down in my stateroom and eschew the menu of "must do" activities ensuring that I would be satisfied at the conclusion of the trip with some sort of feeling of accomplishment.
To this end I fortified myself with several back issues of The Providence Journal, a New York magazine, and some sort of thought provoking tome. I chose, arbitrarily ALBANY STREET KID, by the novelist Carmen J. Viglucci, which I would ration chapter-wise until landfall in Miami.
Within hours, I consumed the Newspapers, the New York Magazine, and I was now ready to fine out what Viglucci would have to say.
I noted that I began reading the book at 2 PM on a Tuesday. Intending to read until dinner time. The chapters reached out and nailed me. Missing dinner, and hunger pangs notwithstanding, I soldiered on, totally engrossed and unable to stop. Mr. Viglucci captivated me totally. The critic Judith Manza wrote and I quote, "Memoirs, especially those of self-published authors, are often nothing nothing more than a tedious stringing together of events which have meaning for no one except the one penning them" unquote. She is so right. My own memoir published a few years back bears this comment out in spades.
Viglucci's affectionate account of the Albany of his youth draws one in totally. The dramatis personae he bring'em on in a Dickensonian fashion.
"By their works ye shall know them" say the Scriptures. There is Doodles Duncan. Then on comes Big Tooth Calabro followed by Fourzie Calabro. These names were earned, from prominent front teeth to a 4oz draft appellation. Then comes Willie Haupt (aka hop toad). Things were called as they were.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Regan on March 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
MY FIRST COUSIN, CARMEN (BUTCH, JUNIOR) AUTHORED THIS BOOK. TYPICAL OF THE AUTHOR, I HAD NO KNOWLEDGE HE HAD WRITTEN THE BOOK. IT WAS GREAT TO READ ABOUT SO MUCH OF MY FAMILY'S HISTORY I KNEW LITTLE OF. WE GREW UP AS KIDS IN ALBANY, NY AND SPENT MANY SUNDAY DINNERS AT POP'S HOUSE ON VAN WOERT STREET. WONDERFUL MEMORIES. MICKEY REGAN
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Laurence on February 28, 2013
Format: Paperback
The period when Carmen Viglucci was growing up in Albany--the years just prior to WWII--seem in retrospect to have been a golden era in American life, a time when immigrant groups had not yet merged but were still finding their way toward mutual accommodation, and when people still greeted one another on the street as a matter of course. Kids like Viglucci could be corrected by any passing adult, and they roamed freely in a richly stimulating and challenging environment.
Viglucci writes with less art but more heart about the time and place that are special province of novelist William Kennedy as he recounts in detail the bookies, the machine politicians, his grade school girlfriends and street buddies, and his extended Irish and Italian families; in fact his memory for names and places is nothing short of astonishing.
This memoir will be cherished by the author's family and friends, no doubt, but the street level view of life in this interesting time and place will no doubt also hold special interest for historians of the future.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fran on April 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Carmen is my first cousin. His mother and my mother were sisters on the Fitzgerald side of the family. My mother told my brother and I some of these stories and it was really a delight reading this book. My father passed away about a week after I purchased this. He would have loved this book as he loved my mother's family. I enjoyed it very much. We have a great family and this book makes you appreciate that fact all the more. Thank you Carmen for writing this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Paul S. Costa on September 28, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What is it about old age that causes men to want to chronicle their past? Whatever it is, I hope I'm bless with it when my time comes! Mr. Viglucci describes his era with pathos, wit and humor. A nice read about a much simpler time.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Marge on May 21, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great to go back in time - so many memories of growing up in downtown Albany. If you ever want to reminisce....read this book. Wonderful to recognize so many names and places and be young again. This book was a surprise gift to me and I'm happy to have it and be able to read it over again. (I've already recommended it to my dear 'old' friends.)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Judith C. Manza on November 17, 2012
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Memoirs, especially those of self-published authors, are often nothing more than a tedious stringing-together of chronological events which have meaning for no one except the one penning them. Not so Albany Street Kid. Written with unabashed affection for the quirky characters inhabiting the pages, Viglucci's straightforward, yet still charming, account of the Albany of his youth and the union of the two familial ethnicities achieves the goal of making this thoroughly modern reader wish she could have been there.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Francis on October 18, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a book I have been waiting for about forty years to read. Now that I have, I can't help but feel there isn't enough of it...and hope that more is on the way. You aren't likely to come upon retired newspaper editor Carmen Viglucci's Albany Street Kid by accident. I imagine most readers will be longtime fans of Viglucci's weekly columns that appeared in two Rochester NY newspapers, the Catholic Courier which he edited and the Golden Times which he owned. His Courier column was called The Slot Man--a reference to the editorial position he held on the copy desks of several upstate New York daily newspapers--where he cut his journalistic eye-teeth. Like his columns, the book's prose is conversational, the story told in newspaper column-length bits that often end a bit too abruptly, and the humor wry and understated, if stated at all.

I briefly worked with the author forty years ago and I recall he kept a file folder in a desk drawer marked "Book". I'm pretty sure nothing in this book came from that file. It has turned out to be a remembrance of his childhood and early adolescence that sits comfortably somewhere between Proust's Remembrance of Things Past and Henry Hill's Wiseguy. It is part a footnote to William Kennedy's "O Albany!" and mostly the territory well-tilled by story tellers like Harry Golden, Jean Shepherd and Garrison Keillor--and if it Golden himself weren't virtually forgotten, I'd use him as a reference point.
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