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Alex Cross's TRIAL [Kindle Edition]

James Patterson , Richard DiLallo
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (528 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $10.00
Kindle Price: $7.99
You Save: $2.01 (20%)
Sold by: Hachette Book Group

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Book Description

Separated by time

From his grandmother, Alex Cross has heard the story of his great uncle Abraham and his struggles for survival in the era of the Ku Klux Klan. Now, Alex passes the family tale along to his own children in a novel he's written--a novel called Trial.

Connected by blood

As a lawyer in turn-of-the-century Washington D.C., Ben Corbett represents the toughest cases. Fighting against oppression and racism, he risks his family and his life in the process. When President Roosevelt asks Ben to return to his home town to investigate rumors of the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan there, he cannot refuse.

United by bravery

When he arrives in Eudora, Mississippi, Ben meets the wise Abraham Cross and his beautiful granddaughter, Moody. Ben enlists their help, and the two Crosses introduce him to the hidden side of the idyllic Southern town. Lynchings have become commonplace and residents of the town's black quarter live in constant fear. Ben aims to break the reign of terror--but the truth of who is really behind it could break his heart. Written in the fearless voice of Detective Alex Cross, Alex Cross's Trial is a gripping story of murder, love, and, above all, bravery.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Framed as a book written by Patterson's iconic detective, Alex Cross, the story centers on the relationship between Cross's great-uncle Abraham and civil rights lawyer Ben Corbett, who teamed up at the turn of the 20th century to fight the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi. Shawn Andrew's turn as Alex in the introduction is unmemorable, but Dylan Baker, the core narrator, captures listeners with keen emphasis and pacing. Even if his voice tends to be a bit caricatured (his Theodore Roosevelt invokes an old-time radio shtick), his overall efforts—coupled with typical Patterson pacing and prose—will keep listeners hooked. A Little, Brown hardcover. (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Dylan Baker, the core narrator, captures listeners with keen emphasis and pacing...His overall efforts-coupled with typical Patterson pacing and prose-will keep listeners hooked." (Publishers Weekly 2009)

Product Details

  • File Size: 516 KB
  • Print Length: 380 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; 1st edition (August 24, 2009)
  • Sold by: Hachette Book Group
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002L4EXKQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,950 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
373 of 422 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars BEWARE--Not really an Alex Cross book August 28, 2009
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
In typical Patterson style, this book was a very easy and fast read: the chapters are short, the font is large, and the descriptive text is kept to a minimum. That pretty much sums up the good qualities of the book. Patterson should be ashamed of himself titling this book Alex Cross's Trial. This is clearly a marketing ploy to lure in unsuspecting Alex Cross fans. The first two pages are about Alex Cross and he is not mentioned again in the entire 380 pages. The book is really about lynching in the South in the early 1900s. There aren't any twists and turns in the plot to keep the reader riveted and the conclusion is absolutely non-climatic. A real disappointment.
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121 of 142 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Is James Patterson even writing these books anymore???? September 6, 2009
By jeff
Format:Hardcover
This will be my last James Patterson book, if for no other reason that I'm pissed that a book with "Alex Cross" in the title IS NOT AN ALEX CROSS BOOK. If this isn't false advertising, I don't know what is. As someone who has read almost everything James Patterson has ever written, it's hard for me to believe that Patterson even had a hand in this one, or in the last one (Cross Country) for that matter. I think Patterson has sold out, and is letting just about anyone stick his name on their book. There are too many GOOD authors out there to keep wasting your money on this guy.
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180 of 215 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Racism fuels the fires of the deep south in 1906. August 24, 2009
Format:Hardcover
It is hard to find authors as popular as James Patterson, and his Alex Cross books are at the epicenter. Let's remove the Patterson name for a moment and take an in-depth look at this newest novel. In 1906, race relations are being threatened; The war has just ended; Equality is still a foreign concept -- especially in the south. Theodore Roosevelt (the President of the USA) has placed an urgent call to Ben Corbett - a prestigious lawyer - summoning him to The White House. The President instructs Corbett to seek the aid of Abraham Cross in his home town of Mississippi, and together, investigate the outbreak of burning and lynching of minorities.

When he does arrive, it doesn't take him long to find Cross whom is being escorted by a beautiful young woman, Moody. Moody is Cross' grand daughter and together they show Corbett the true extent of the hate-filled assaults in a once peaceful town. While it does take Ben Corbett a while to accept the truth, he does finally come to realize just how dire the situation is. I'll stop there so I don't spoil the story for anyone whom has yet to read this brilliant novel. There are so many twists-and turns (the biggest being Abraham Cross - the grandfather of Alex) The racial overtones are done incredibly well, and while it is graphic at times, they do serve a greater purpose and keep the novel on track.

Now let's put the Patterson name back, and this good novel becomes great. Patterson is the master of suspense, intrigue, and lifellike characters that change and evolve the story to a level that only a very few authors can replicate. Do I really need to mention this? I mean seriously, if you don't know how good Patterson is...then that cave you live in must be nice and cozy. I'm joking. This latest novel to grace the Patterson name is an exciting thrill ride, that moves along at breakneck speeds and gives the reader a reason to place Patterson back on top of the genre. Well done. Well done, indeed.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This Is No Alex Cross Book - It Is A Cash Grab September 4, 2009
Format:Hardcover
I honestly think that James Patterson sold the rights to the name "Alex Cross" for use in the title, and had nothing else to do with the book. Alex Cross is in the book for two pages (which is the prologue I believe), and has nothing else to do with it. With another Alex Cross book coming out in a couple of months, this was no doubt just a cash grab.

Regardless of who wrote the book, it's a poor novel. The writing is choppy, the story is weak, and it just does not grab your interest.
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35 of 41 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Figure it out already! September 3, 2009
By Bowse
Format:Hardcover
I like most James Patterson novels, but if you haven't noticed, almost every book that he "writes" now says JAMES PATTERSON with "Unknown Author". What that says to me is that he receives books from unpublished/unknown authors and, for a huge payday, slaps his name on them in huge letters so that they immediately become best sellers. Win-Win for both him and the new author. The losers are the dupes who continue to buy them thinking they are written by Patterson. I guess it's fine if you are entertained but I think it is very underhanded.
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42 of 50 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Southern (Dis)Comfort August 24, 2009
Format:Hardcover
Alex Cross is a star in James Patterson's fiction universe. This book, co-authored by Richard Dilallo, looks at Alex's great-uncle, Abraham, who was born a slave in 1817. The story begins in 1906, when Abraham was 89, about forty years after slavery's demise. Abraham is poor and lives in the "Quarters," an African-American neighborhood in Eudora, Mississippi.

The central character in the book is Ben Corbett, a young white lawyer in Washington, D.C. He served as a captain in the Spanish-American War (1898) under Colonel Theodore Roosevelt. In 1906 Roosevelt, now President, sends his friend Ben on a secret mission to Eudora (Corbett's hometown) to study the recent epidemic of lynchings in the area. Roosevelt has arranged for Ben to meet the aforementioned Abraham Cross, a wise man who is well-respected in the black community. Abraham gives Ben vital assistance.

Although the authors do not use the term, "Jim Crow" had taken over the South by 1906. Jim Crow was a system of virtually complete segregation designed to humiliate African-Americans and enforce their status as second-class citizens. An integral part of Jim Crow was physical intimidation, including lynching. According to Wikipedia, between 1880 and 1951, 3,437 African-Americans were lynched, mostly in the Deep South.

Graphic descriptions of assaults, mob violence, and lynchings make up a big part of this book.

The novel opens when Ben returns to his hometown after an absence of six years. He finds that many of his former friends and neighbors are upset with his outspoken opposition to Jim Crow and lynching. He does, however, have some loyal friends, including Elizabeth Begley, Ben's first flame. Well, the fire is still there, although both Ben and Elizabeth have married others.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprising, but an excellent book.
Not at all what one would expect from an "Akex Cross" novel; however I found it quite engaging and revealing about racism in the South. Would recommend it.
Published 4 hours ago by Paula
5.0 out of 5 stars It is a good read.
I have read the entire Alex Cross series. It is a good read.
Published 3 days ago by Mary Ann Vogelsong
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
great
Published 3 days ago by TCRAIG
1.0 out of 5 stars I didn't like this book at all
I didn't like this book at all. It didn't fit into the series. It was a misfit. I am now reading I, Alex Cross and the story continues.
Published 4 days ago by Karen L. Long
5.0 out of 5 stars How the KKK operated in the deep south prior to the civil rights...
This was a novel that I didn't expect. It really helped me to understand what was really going on in the deep south concerning the civil rights and criminal justice
Published 10 days ago by SWPhillie
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
Good book but the ending was weak.
Published 12 days ago by Michael Crowe
5.0 out of 5 stars Different
This one was different - liked it.
Published 16 days ago by Minnesota Girl
3.0 out of 5 stars Straight forward Patterson. Interesting idea of opening up the ...
Straight forward Patterson. Interesting idea of opening up the old south, but most characters stay true to their stereotypical form. A quick page turned.
Published 21 days ago by John Sullivan
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
usual good Alex Cross experience
Published 21 days ago by booklover
5.0 out of 5 stars Still another great book, and they seem to keep coming
Still another great book, and they seem to keep coming, I want all of his books and own 13 at this point.
Published 23 days ago by Michael Stoffal
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More About the Author

It is no surprise that in January, 2010, The New York Times Magazine featured James Patterson on its cover and hailed him as having "transformed book publishing," and that Time magazine hailed him as "The Man Who Can't Miss." Recently, NBC's Rock Center with Brian Williams profiled Patterson's prolific career, AARP named him one of the "50 Most Influential People Who Make Our Days a Little Brighter," and Variety featured him in a cover story highlighting his adventures in Hollywood.

In 2013, it was estimated that one-in-five of all hardcover suspense/thriller novels sold was written by James Patterson, his books have sold over 300 million copies worldwide, and he holds the Guinness record for the most #1 New York Times bestsellers of any author. And his success isn't based solely on thrillers like the perennially popular Alex Cross, Women's Murder Club and Michael Bennett series. Patterson is now also the current bestselling author in the young adult and middle grade categories.

He's been called the busiest man in publishing, and that's not just because of his own books. For the past decade, James has been devoting more and more of his time to championing books and reading. From the James Patterson Pageturner Awards, to his website ReadKiddoRead.com, to his College Book Bucks scholarships and his regular donations of hundreds of thousands of books to schools here in the states and troops overseas (see interviews on Fox & Friends, The Dennis Miller Radio Show and CNN.com), Patterson has passed on his passion of books and reading and supported those who do the same. Jim personally funded a major ad campaign re-printing a recent opinion piece on CNN.com about how it is our responsibility to get our kids reading. The ad has run in the New York Times, The New Yorker, and USA Today. Those ads are a call to action to parents to make their kids reading a top priority; and were featured by USA Today here. Patterson believes that we cannot rely on schools, teachers or the government to get our kids reading; only parents can make this crucial change in the reading habits of our kids. Here are links to some interviews on his first-ever dual lay down (two books, one for parents and one for kids, in one day): AOL's You've Got, NBC's "Today Show" with Hoda and Kathie Lee, USA Today and Family Circle, NBC's "Today Show" with Al Roker, as well as an interview with AARP.

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Kindle price EXACT same as hardcover price
I agree-the same goes for the new Kathy Reichs novel!
Aug 25, 2009 by Anthony DeVito |  See all 14 posts
Kindle Books for $9.99
Me too. If this isn't a "New Release," I don't know what is. Does anyone know how to oing Amazon on this topic -- ie, how to ASK them to honor their own guidelines?
Aug 31, 2009 by C. Spencer |  See all 3 posts
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