Alexander

March 1, 2011 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:55
30
2
5:03
30
3
4:20
30
4
3:14
30
5
3:29
30
6
5:01
30
7
4:51
30
8
3:17
30
9
5:40
30
10
3:15
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 1, 2011
  • Release Date: March 1, 2011
  • Label: Community Music
  • Copyright: (C) 2011 Community Music (US)
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 41:05
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004P60NJ8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,014 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By JG on June 14, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you're reading this, chances are you already know that Alexander Ebert is the frontman for Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes. It's interesting how he creates a totally different vibe on his self titled debut than with the Zeroes. This record arguably fits best in the "freak folk" genre (on that note, maybe the Zeroes fits in that genre too, but I digress). From the beginning, there's a distinct Dylan influence, both in non sequitur yet poetic sounding lyrics to the way Alexander enunciates the words in very similar fashion to a younger Dylan. As the album progresses, however, the listener might find himself or herself thinking "....wait, now he sounds a lot like Paul Simon....there's that unmistakable Afro Brazilian undercurrent, and the diction has morphed from Dylan to Simon...".

Like one of his fellow freak folk travelers, Devendra Banhart, there's also a Brazilian element going on here. Lastly, as one reviewer has pointed out, Alexander can belt out some of the best soul crooning this side of Marvin Gaye. Great listening, and a prominent reminder and example that there's still a lot of exciting, stimulating music being made today.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By John B on March 16, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you are looking to be more in touch with your relaxed/Bohemian side, and suffering from road rage 9-5 disorder, then buy this album immediately. I have a CD collection, although been mostly downloading my indie favs in recent years, but felt compelled to buy the physical CD. I saw Edward Sharpe last year at Coachella and was blown away and have been into Ebert since.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lohas addict on April 25, 2011
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
These are the laid-back, long-haired guys who came to your high school party in Sesame Street t-shirts and sandals and took all the girls with them when they left. What they've done here is upbeat indie folk-rock at its best. Rhythms that are joyful without being infantile, and lyrics that get deeper with every listen without being too pretentiously clever. I've been very pleasantly surprised by how long I've been keeping this album on repeat, without ever feeling the urge to skip tracks. If these songs had come out in the 60s, everyone in the country would know them by now.
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16 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Heather Dilley on March 11, 2011
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
I was, also, looking forward to this album because of the release of Truth, last fall. It has a laid back hippie, sing/rap vibe. However, with the release of A Million Years about a month or two ago, I realized that there'd be a diverse set of styles featured on this album. It is a great song, too! It did take me a few listens to get into the folky vibe that most of the rest of the album features. I give a solid 5 out of 5 stars for tracks 3 - 7 & 9. Track 9 is another surprise; sounds like a Sam Cooke balad! All in all, in recent memory, I can't think of many albums that I've enjoyed as thoroughly as this one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By F. schmitt on January 13, 2012
Format: MP3 Music
Hey, this is soooooo much better than Sharpe and the Zero's. Despite what some others have written this isn't a snore nor are the songs hit or miss. This is a well constructed album that hits the mark in all the places that the collective work fell short. I can't stop listening to it!
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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jon Lee Hart on March 29, 2011
Format: MP3 Music
As I listened to this album I couldn't help but be reminded of folk rock acts popular in the 1960's/70's like Donovan and Dylan...the jangly guitars, the hand claps, the storytelling. Ebert played every instrument on this album, from guitars to violins...even a clarinet. The album is perfect to listen to straight through; songs meld from one to the next.

Songs like "In The Twilight" highlight Ebert's strength as a songwriter. To skim the surface one may find a simple, knee slapping love song fit for a hootenanny. After a good soaking the story's complexity reveals itself to be a slip and slide of love, friendship, life, and death. Ebert breaks out the folk-hop on lead single, "Truth." Again, this song works on two levels. On the surface there is a song that is audibly compelling; the strolling melody, the whistle, the shaman-like whoops. Dig deeper and you find a story about coming to terms with one's past. "Glimpses" is a touchingly tender track which arouses memories of Redding's "These Arms of Mine." Although the stories are radically different, there is a feeling of bareness and fragility that is beautiful.

This stunning debut is available now. Pick it up, press play, and forget the world for a spell.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rachel on September 21, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
What does a profoundly gifted, innovative singer and songwriter do in between gigs? Well, if you're Alex Ebert, the lead vocalist of the legendary juggernaut "Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros," you seclude yourself in your bedroom and channel all of your boundless creativity, with reckless abandon, into a personal and uninhibited project. You make it completely your own--your intimate thoughts, your tributes to past and present influences, your own quirky blend of sounds and styles--and you even play every last instrument that accompanies your musical offering.

The remaining question, albeit a consideration that was glaringly absent from the production phase and ultimately insignificant to the value of the creation, was how it would be recieved by listeners. The release of the first single, "Truth," had audiences scrambling for what they assumed would be a rap infused, Bohemian-type affair. Therefore, the variation among tracks, which is only rivaled by that of the unpredictable directions of Ebert's disheveled facial hair, likely resulted in a collective and resounding jaw drop. It's style is completely incohesive--but, being an explorative enterprise and an expression of Ebert's vast musical influences, it's not meant to be thematic. Although it was probably not intentional, Ebert seemed to be toying with listeners who arrived at the scene with preconceptions and rigid expectations.

While "Truth" is the most radio-friendly, and sure to be the most well-recieved track on the album, it would be reprehensible to overlook the other exemplary output that it offers.
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