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Alice [DVD + Blu-ray]


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Blu-ray 1-Disc Version
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Product Details

  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, PAL, Import
  • Language: Czech (PCM)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Rachel Rocks Studios
  • DVD Release Date: April 3, 1982
  • Run Time: 86 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004LNSFMM
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #401,666 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Customer Reviews

His films are the most original movies I have EVER seen.
Steven Barker
Apparently it was a lifelong ambition of Jan Svankmajer, the Czech master of animation, to film his own interpretation of "Alice in Wonderland"!
Michael Anthony Brenton
A few bits of this film might freak out little kids, but they will probably be bewildered anyway.
Misao Misako

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Clandestine42 on December 9, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
This is a film for children. . . sort of, with these ominous words we enter a decaying, claustrophobic wonderland filled with rusty drafting instruments, filthy shards of pottery, lots of sawdust and ageing specimen jars. Watching this movie is like being locked in a closet for a few hours, not exactly fun but impossible to escape. Alice herself undergoes the transformation from a barefoot little girl to a nineteenth century china doll exquisitley animated by the master of stop motion animation as she crawls through desk drawers and grim hallways. the famillar characters of wonderland become rotting museum displays scurrying about like nightmarish clockwork toys. the sound effects add considerably to the eldritch atmosphere - splintering wood, grating metal, and what sounds like some sort of ratchet create a disturbing effect, further reminding us how far from reality we are. this is definitely the best adaptation of Lewis Carrols masterpiece, and the rarest of all commodities - an original voice.
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72 of 82 people found the following review helpful By D. Knouse on May 12, 2004
Format: DVD
There are only two negatives to this film that I felt were mostly unnecessary elements. One was the frequent edit to a close-up of Alice's, excuse me "Alenka's," tiny mouth and stained yellow teeth saying things like "Said the White Rabbit" or "Said the Queen of Hearts." By the time this monotony reached the double-digits I was getting annoyed. I knew which character said what, and I didn't need a constant reminder. The other negative, and this is up for debate, is that I don't like foreign films that are dubbed in English. Call me crazy, but I prefer subtitles. There is always something lost in the translation. Well, enough of my negativity. There is plenty here worth seeing, and if you are a genuine nut-case for stop-motion filmmaking than you should thoroughly enjoy this movie. This is not a children's film! There are way too many unnerving and nightmarish sequences. In fact, this film feels like a surreal nightmare! There's a slab of meat that squirms into a pot, there are little rat skulls breaking out of egg shells, and my favorite moment of the film comes when Alice is being chased by the White Rabbit and his grotesque friends. Alice slams the door and bars the smaller door at the base. Suddenly, an axe-head bursts through the tiny door repeatedly until it is completely splintered. The axe withdraws and the head of the White Rabbit(a stuffed rabbit with sawdust for entrails) pokes through and he seems to stare at Alice with an evil glare from his glassy white eyes. I expected him to say "Heeeere's Thumper!" That was the creepiest moment for me, but there are others. There are also some wrenching sound effects that add some excellent flavor to the nightmarish proceedings.Read more ›
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Misao Misako on January 26, 2006
Format: VHS Tape
Czech animator Svankmajer's "Alice" is an outlandish work of genius. It is based on Lewis Carroll's classic "Alice in Wonderland" but this is definitely the filmmaker's own take on things, and a surreal take it is. Alice (a live girl) is half asleep in a lonely attic when a stuffed rabbit (stop-motion animation) in a glass case pulls up his nailed-down feet, rips a pocket watch out of his own sawdust stuffing, and we're off on an eerie adventure. Much of the film is very quiet; there is no background music, just superb, tactile sound effects that help us appreciate every loving, weird detail that comes along. Of these there are many; Svankmajer, like Carroll, has the true surrealist's eye for simple images that are extremely powerful and memorable, but for reasons our conscious mind can't possibly explain. Occasionally Alice herself speaks any necessary dialogue, as if narrating her own dream; we often cut to a shot of her lips moving and completely unrelated words come out in English with a delightful British accent. (Some reviewers below have found this apparent disconnect between the moving lips and the English speech annoying but I found it strangely magical, and very much intentional on the filmmaker's part.) The detailed puppetry amid these claustrophobic indoor diorama sets is wonderfully done. A few bits of this film might freak out little kids, but they will probably be bewildered anyway. Instead, adults who appreciate carefully done, brilliant, undigital whimsy will hopefully enjoy this little jewel as much as I did; I first watched with intrigued delight, and every few years I like to watch it again.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on January 3, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This disk contains two features. "Darkness, Light, Darkness" is a claymation short, and very odd. The main feature, "Alice", combines live action with stop-animation and is even more peculiar. I like both, even though I'm not wholly sure what to make of either.

DLD is all staged in a small room. A person arrives, over the course of the piece, one body part at a time. A hand comes first, then eyes, another hand, the senses, body, and (very late) brain. The whole person is built up from the parts as they arrive and is finally completed - within the room, trapped by doors and windows much too small to allow it to escape.

"Alice" is the most memorable Alice in Wonderland that I've seen. It features only one living actor. She's a young girl, maybe eight years old - a brilliant piece of casting and brilliant in simply being herself. She wears a pretty pink dress and a serious expression throughout. She also wears her smudges and snarls unselfconciously, tends to throw stones, and never shies from the violence implicit in Lewis Carroll's original story.

Svankmajer wanders back and forth across Carroll's story, intersecting at many points. Whether inside Carroll's script or out, Svankmajer aways presents his own vision, one that tends towards the macabre. The White Rabbit is a taxidermy specimen, often leaking sawdust and often licking it back up again. Instead of a mirror, Alice walks through a drawer in a drafting table - the artist's "mirror" on his world - and walks through others at many transitions.

Maybe half the movie is stop-motion animation, but the distinctions are not alway clear. Like Harryhausen, Svankmajer often combines model animation with the real girl.
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